Decreased energy after waking up

Posted by aliali @aliali, Jun 27, 2019

I am diagnosed with depression. If I wake up, I feel very exhausted. I feel like pulling myself from the bed ! Before I sleep, I feel much better. Sleep should make me full of energy, butI see the opposite. Exercise helps a lot to deal with that. But I want to solve this issue radically.
1. What is causing me to feel exhausted after waking?
2. What is the solution of that?

@aliali Sometimes when we do not get restful sleep, we awaken and feel tired. What would cause the bad sleep? Eating the wrong foods, not being able to relax, perhaps thinking about problems or upcoming events, too much exercise in the hours before sleeping, poor sleeping environment (noisy, light). Do any of these sound like it might be part of your sleeping problems?
Ginger

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,@ Aliali Another possibility could be your mattress If it's to old or is lumpy it could be your mattress

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There are any number of things affecting sleep patterns. One of the areas to consider is apnea. I got a cpap and was much better off for it. That being said, one needs a doc to send you for a sleep study to determine the time in each stage of sleep. I gained weight and that likely was a major contributing factor but it’s not always the only one.

There are plenty of things to tinker with before that to rule out other causative or contributory factors.

Dark room: so your body registers it’s time to sleep. City lights and other sources can interfere. I use blackout curtains.

Silence though that varies. I like a white noise like a fan.

No stimulation before bed. I’m shaky on the time gap between activity and sleep but television and the like ramps up the mind for hours.

Stimulants like sugars and caffeine certainly don’t help and I’ve read that those can take six hours or more to run their course.

Despite having a sedative effect, alcohol disrupts sleep.

I take melatonin and theanine because they’re otc and don’t interact with Rx. Melatonin only signals the body it’s time to sleep but doesn’t help you sleep well. Theanine supposedly helps improve sleep itself.

My psychiatrist warned against using Benadryl for any length of time as it can disrupt things if you stop.

If the neurotransmitters are off, none of this make make that much difference, but they are worth exploring as relatively simple fixes, save the sleep study which is more involved.

As always, mention what your doing to the MD so that they can give feed back should something about these change.

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Hi, @aliali – A few others who may have some thoughts on feeling exhausted after waking include @contentandwell @sandytoes14 @pjss48 @peejayo @gettingbetter @acea.

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Only my opinion, but I feel that when you are depressed, your issues just hit you like a ton of bricks upon arising. Its like your mood, right there, is in your face. When this happens to me, I tell myself something positive, immediately. If that does not work, I tell myself another positive thing, immediately. Then I get going. I start my day. I shower, first thing, because that helps to shake out the cob webs, so to speak. I don't know if you can really change this, but what I do, helps. Good luck, Lori Renee

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@lorirenee1 I think we have to do what ever we fill is right for us Ive been tired when waking up for about a week now. I read my Bible pray coffee then get a shower the hot water helps with my back pain and this gets me started on my day . Exercising then some or stretching I should say . Even tho I really want to go back to bed I push myself to do these things . One think I do is take a ginsing pill for the energy this really helps me . Just have to keep fighting !

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@aliali For me, the problem is most often simply that I have so many nighttime bathroom calls. That really disrupts my sleep. When I am anxious about something that causes me to have problems getting to sleep also, so when I have both of those I wake up exhausted. I generally get up, do whatever such as dressing, having breakfast, and my fatigue is generally relieved to an extent that I can continue with my day. On the days when I get up and find myself continuing to really drag, and almost feel woozy from inadequate sleep, I go back and take a nap. If I go two or three nights with inadequate sleep I have a tiny prescription of lorazepam (my PCP gives me about 10, lowest dosage, pills a year!) and I will take one. That does help.

There are things that can help with sleep but if you are getting enough sleep then your problem is entirely different. I do occasionally use Benadryl (the generic labeled as a sleep aid) or 3mg of melatonin. I do not like to use anything too regularly though because everything is habit forming.
JK

Liked by Lisa Lucier, Parus

REPLY
@lorirenee1

Only my opinion, but I feel that when you are depressed, your issues just hit you like a ton of bricks upon arising. Its like your mood, right there, is in your face. When this happens to me, I tell myself something positive, immediately. If that does not work, I tell myself another positive thing, immediately. Then I get going. I start my day. I shower, first thing, because that helps to shake out the cob webs, so to speak. I don't know if you can really change this, but what I do, helps. Good luck, Lori Renee

Jump to this post

That, too, is a common issue with me; I think about my dreads, worries, and cares as soon as I awake. It's both feeling down as well as a symptom of a depressive episode.
Taking a shower helps me, too.
A few years ago, I used to go for a short run first thing, but for now starting with a shower is helpful.

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Yes, life can be so challenging. But ya gotta find ways to cope, and then by doing, you can even cheer up!!!! Lori

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@lorirenee1

Yes, life can be so challenging. But ya gotta find ways to cope, and then by doing, you can even cheer up!!!! Lori

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@aliali – I also have a diagnosis of depression. I've noticed with myself that if I'm feeling depressed or down, I have more trouble getting up in the morning and just want to fall back asleep.

@lorirenee1 – do you have suggestions on the types of positive things you say to yourself upon waking in the morning?

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@contentandwell

@aliali For me, the problem is most often simply that I have so many nighttime bathroom calls. That really disrupts my sleep. When I am anxious about something that causes me to have problems getting to sleep also, so when I have both of those I wake up exhausted. I generally get up, do whatever such as dressing, having breakfast, and my fatigue is generally relieved to an extent that I can continue with my day. On the days when I get up and find myself continuing to really drag, and almost feel woozy from inadequate sleep, I go back and take a nap. If I go two or three nights with inadequate sleep I have a tiny prescription of lorazepam (my PCP gives me about 10, lowest dosage, pills a year!) and I will take one. That does help.

There are things that can help with sleep but if you are getting enough sleep then your problem is entirely different. I do occasionally use Benadryl (the generic labeled as a sleep aid) or 3mg of melatonin. I do not like to use anything too regularly though because everything is habit forming.
JK

Jump to this post

You’ve mentioned the issue of nocturia to your MD?

Liked by Lisa Lucier

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@gingerw

@aliali Sometimes when we do not get restful sleep, we awaken and feel tired. What would cause the bad sleep? Eating the wrong foods, not being able to relax, perhaps thinking about problems or upcoming events, too much exercise in the hours before sleeping, poor sleeping environment (noisy, light). Do any of these sound like it might be part of your sleeping problems?
Ginger

Jump to this post

@gingerw
In fact, I would say it is due to thinking (worrying or anxiety)

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@renwald

There are any number of things affecting sleep patterns. One of the areas to consider is apnea. I got a cpap and was much better off for it. That being said, one needs a doc to send you for a sleep study to determine the time in each stage of sleep. I gained weight and that likely was a major contributing factor but it’s not always the only one.

There are plenty of things to tinker with before that to rule out other causative or contributory factors.

Dark room: so your body registers it’s time to sleep. City lights and other sources can interfere. I use blackout curtains.

Silence though that varies. I like a white noise like a fan.

No stimulation before bed. I’m shaky on the time gap between activity and sleep but television and the like ramps up the mind for hours.

Stimulants like sugars and caffeine certainly don’t help and I’ve read that those can take six hours or more to run their course.

Despite having a sedative effect, alcohol disrupts sleep.

I take melatonin and theanine because they’re otc and don’t interact with Rx. Melatonin only signals the body it’s time to sleep but doesn’t help you sleep well. Theanine supposedly helps improve sleep itself.

My psychiatrist warned against using Benadryl for any length of time as it can disrupt things if you stop.

If the neurotransmitters are off, none of this make make that much difference, but they are worth exploring as relatively simple fixes, save the sleep study which is more involved.

As always, mention what your doing to the MD so that they can give feed back should something about these change.

Jump to this post

@renwald ;
I cannot describe how depression changed my life. Every issue I experience was due to depression. For instance, backache, headache, oversleeping and overeating, having an overly oily skin etc are all caused by depression. I remember when I better controlled depression in the past. I slept much better. I can confidently attribute my pool sleep to depression and anxiety without hesitance! I never changed my mattress or the adjust the lighting and noise in my bedroom. However, if my mood is good, I sleep calmly!

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@lorirenee1

Only my opinion, but I feel that when you are depressed, your issues just hit you like a ton of bricks upon arising. Its like your mood, right there, is in your face. When this happens to me, I tell myself something positive, immediately. If that does not work, I tell myself another positive thing, immediately. Then I get going. I start my day. I shower, first thing, because that helps to shake out the cob webs, so to speak. I don't know if you can really change this, but what I do, helps. Good luck, Lori Renee

Jump to this post

@lorirenee1 I truly agree with you. Depression could cause you several negative results. I have to better control my depression to sleep much better

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@contentandwell

@aliali For me, the problem is most often simply that I have so many nighttime bathroom calls. That really disrupts my sleep. When I am anxious about something that causes me to have problems getting to sleep also, so when I have both of those I wake up exhausted. I generally get up, do whatever such as dressing, having breakfast, and my fatigue is generally relieved to an extent that I can continue with my day. On the days when I get up and find myself continuing to really drag, and almost feel woozy from inadequate sleep, I go back and take a nap. If I go two or three nights with inadequate sleep I have a tiny prescription of lorazepam (my PCP gives me about 10, lowest dosage, pills a year!) and I will take one. That does help.

There are things that can help with sleep but if you are getting enough sleep then your problem is entirely different. I do occasionally use Benadryl (the generic labeled as a sleep aid) or 3mg of melatonin. I do not like to use anything too regularly though because everything is habit forming.
JK

Jump to this post

@contentandwell;
Regarding melatonin, it helped my fall asleep, but didn’t help me sleep calmly and soundly. The countless issues in my life are easily dealt with if I control my depression and stress

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