Thoracic aortic aneurysm

Posted by jbsb93 @jbsb93, Jul 28, 2011

‘I was born with a hole in my heart and have had 2 surgeries. One to fix hole and the other a valve replacement. I’ve been recently told the I have a thoracic aneurysm and possibly will need more surgery.. Anyone gone th ru this before?’?

@degarden_girl

Hi Drew, I am so happy that the aneurysm is stable. This can continue as just a stable abnormality for the rest of your life. I am sure your cardio is continuing to monitor the situation and will advise you as to what changes in lifestyle might be advisable. The cardio might also suggest medications; last year my cardio placed me on metoprolol, half tablet, to reduce any pressure on the aneurysm to help keep it stable.

Continue to enjoy your life; don't worry about something you can't change. The bicuspid valve might have been a contributing factor to your situation and that formed early in vitro. Nothing you could have done to change that so don't blame yourself for anything.

I wish you continued good health.

Donna

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Just wanted to say thank you so much for your support inspiration and kindness . He told me could be decades if ever since small and stable. No treatment given yet and tbd in another year when I see him. Hope I have the strength to wait that long even though I feel good. Hope your doing well too.

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@twocents

I didn't know that an aortic aneurysm could be caused by low blood pressure? Mine is most likely caused because of an bicuspid valve.

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Recently found out mine was caused by bicuspid too , what symptoms did you have – mine has been life long on and off palpitations- random

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what is bicuspid?

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@anniejam

what is bicuspid?

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Hello,
The typical Heart Valve has 3 (Tri) Leaflets to the Valve. Bicuspid, has 2 (Bi) Leaflets to the Valve. The Leaflets flap open and closed with the pulsing for the heart. The Heart is a Pump. When it contracts, it forces blood to move thru the body. The Valves keep the blood from rushing backwards into the Heart in the case of an Aortic Valve. One in a 100 people have the condition of Bicuspid Aortic Heart Valve, so just 1% of the population which seems small, but that a lot of people when your population is 300 million. Still an exclusive club!

The Bicuspid Valve having just 2 Leaflets wears out much sooner than the Tricuspid Valve. The two leaflets become calcified and stiff and will fail to open and close all the way. They call this Aortic Stenosis. I had all this. Lost energy, couldn't hike on the trails. Had the Valve replaced with a Man Made On-X valve and all is better for the rest of my life.

Hope this helps!
All the best to you!

Bruce
Texas

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I am glad you regained your energy and it was successful! Great explanation!

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Thank you so much for your explanation. I also have the bicuspid valve and the aneurysm to go along with it. Mine is at a 4.6 and I am screened yearly. Last August it was stable from the year before, so I was happy about that. So far the valve is working fine. My son, who is 38 has the same thing. His is at a 4.2.Neither of us dwell on this or even think about it that often. We just try to live life to the fullest and what will be will be. It is comforting to know that others are in our same situation. Best of everything to all of you dealing with this.

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@twocents

Thank you so much for your explanation. I also have the bicuspid valve and the aneurysm to go along with it. Mine is at a 4.6 and I am screened yearly. Last August it was stable from the year before, so I was happy about that. So far the valve is working fine. My son, who is 38 has the same thing. His is at a 4.2.Neither of us dwell on this or even think about it that often. We just try to live life to the fullest and what will be will be. It is comforting to know that others are in our same situation. Best of everything to all of you dealing with this.

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Hello,
Thanks! I enjoy sharing my experience to help others out. Some of my surgeries have been thus far the most difficult event to recover from in my entire life.
My Bicuspid Aortic Valve made it 52 years then that was it, had to be replaced(Valve replaced in 2018). I had the Aortic Aneurysm in 2005 and even then, they knew the Aortic Valve was degrading, but the procedure for the Aneurysm Repair was so long that keeping me on the bypass machine any longer was too risky so they had to leave it alone. If you can replace the valve early in the lifespan, they will use a Man Made valve that will last the rest of your life whereas the Cow or Pig Valves are usually rated for 10-12 years. Glad you and your Son are aware of your conditions and monitor it. Some folks don't even know they have the conditions.

All the best.

Bruce
Texas

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@modafi

I had an open repair for a thoracoabdominal aneurysm that produced a 5.7cm tear. I received a branched graft that included a bypass to the celiac artery, the superior mesenteric artery and to the right and left renal arteries. My aneurysm was found by chance–I had not had any previous heart problems or cholesterol problems and was not on any medication. I went to my primary care to get a flu shot and to say that I would finally have the colonoscopy that he had begged me to have for the past 3 years. When I finally agreed to the colonoscopy after turning 60, my primary questioned the change of heart. I explained that I had been experiencing sharp pains that radiated from just below my left breast down to my hip that lasted for about 30 seconds. The pain was not unbearable–but enough to make me take notice. He wisely stated that this did not sound like a colon problem and did an immediate ultrasound in the office. The ultrasound showed an aneurysm in the aortic root. I'm not sure who was more shocked–my doctor or myself. I had walked into the office feeling fine–and ended up taking my first ambulance ride to a Trauma 1 hospital and being placed in the STIC-U. All pre-op tests were performed — but I needed to wait for 2 weeks until the team of 12 could perform the surgery. I can honestly say that those were some of the most worrisome days I have ever experienced waiting for my surgical call at home. I was afraid to do anything except sit and wait. My surgery was performed on Dec.18th–and I was able to go home a week after surgery. I spent 3 months recuperating and have just returned to work. There are angels that watch over us–you are quite lucky to have the option of waiting for surgery, for most who have this disease dissect and need emergency surgery. God bless you! I hope you can continue to be monitored and medically managed.

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You said it took you 3months to recuperate, why was it that long? Any type of physical therapy? So blessed to have the team to take care of you!

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@june1950

You said it took you 3months to recuperate, why was it that long? Any type of physical therapy? So blessed to have the team to take care of you!

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Hi @june1950,

Welcome to Connect. Are you able to share a few details about yourself? I’d really like to get to know you better, and connect you with fellow members.

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I’m 67 years old and my Aneurysms were found during an X-ray. I was testing to donate a kidney. I have 5 aneurysms. Two were taken care of with my first procedure. I have been waiting for my second procedure since July 8th right after my 1st procedure. Don’t know what you want to know.

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I am new to the forum, I have diagnosed with BAV, ascending aorta aneurysm of 4.99cm(echo), 4.9 cm( following CT), 4.8(second CT after a month) and mild aortic stenosis this year at age 42 during routine health checkup. I have no symptom and no heart problem in my family. I am running 30 miles per week without any problem and have no symptom, still doing my routine. Read a lot of research in this area, the research is lucking epidemiological data. It says, the risk of rupture is ~3%/year at this size. The surgeon recommended surgery with mechanical valve which I am not conferrable with, I am thinking recently approved Biological valve. After I read a lot of research I decided to wait at least for a year and get a second opinion from other surgeon from Cleveland Clinic. Before I do that, I want to do another scan with MRI after six month. I have no other health problem except high blood pressure which controlled using medication. I am not a person who worried that much (I trust God and Science). Anyone who is young like me with similar scenario? Would you please share your experience? Any idea from expert?

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@ch246cf10

Hello,
Thanks! I enjoy sharing my experience to help others out. Some of my surgeries have been thus far the most difficult event to recover from in my entire life.
My Bicuspid Aortic Valve made it 52 years then that was it, had to be replaced(Valve replaced in 2018). I had the Aortic Aneurysm in 2005 and even then, they knew the Aortic Valve was degrading, but the procedure for the Aneurysm Repair was so long that keeping me on the bypass machine any longer was too risky so they had to leave it alone. If you can replace the valve early in the lifespan, they will use a Man Made valve that will last the rest of your life whereas the Cow or Pig Valves are usually rated for 10-12 years. Glad you and your Son are aware of your conditions and monitor it. Some folks don't even know they have the conditions.

All the best.

Bruce
Texas

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Did you share the blood thinning impact on your quality of life? I am inclined to Biological valve instead of mechanical valve.

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