Thoracic aortic aneurysm

Posted by jbsb93 @jbsb93, Jul 28, 2011

‘I was born with a hole in my heart and have had 2 surgeries. One to fix hole and the other a valve replacement. I’ve been recently told the I have a thoracic aneurysm and possibly will need more surgery.. Anyone gone th ru this before?’?

Welcome to Connect, @joanstewart and @1sassydame,

You may notice that I moved your messages and combined it with this existing discussion on thoracic aortic aneurysms. I did this as I thought it would be beneficial for you to be introduced to the many members who have discussed much of what you are experiencing.
If you click on VIEW & REPLY in your email notification, you will see the whole discussion and can join in, meet, and participate with other members talking about their or their loved ones' experiences.

Thoracic aortic aneurysms often grow slowly and usually without symptoms, making them difficult to detect. Some aneurysms will never rupture. Many start small and stay small, and how quickly an aortic aneurysm may grow is difficult to predict.
Here is some information from Mayo Clinic, which I hope you will find helpful: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/thoracic-aortic-aneurysm/symptoms-causes/syc-20350188

@joanstewart, may I ask if you have a family history of aortic aneurysm?
@1sassydame, this discussion on pulmonary hypertension might interest you: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/pulmonary-hypertension/
I’m tagging @bjanderson @windwalker @estrada53 and @thankful to see if they might have some thoughts to share. Do you know the measurements for the aneurysm? How is it being managed at present?

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My brother had an aneurysm in his brain. He had surgery at Mayo in Jacksonville. He passed away about 2years later. Other than that no other family history of aneurysm

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Has surgery been suggested?

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@michellr

Thank you. I am very aftraid of the surgery and to make matters worse I am a cardiac nurse! I am afraid of a stroke, PE, and death during surgery and sudden death if i dont. Do i just go to a local surgeon , i live in Chicago area, or do i go somewhere else. This is stressing out my life. I have humana hmo. Can i even go somewhere like mayo

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I have 4.8 and the surgeon said 5 is the number. Handling stress is the problem. Told not to lift anything over 50. I do a lot of reps at lower weights. Still hard to deal with a time bomb in the chest. I do tell people i know what may get me, but do they know what is after them? Oh well, try to keep stress down which is hard.

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I had an open repair for a thoracoabdominal aneurysm that produced a 5.7cm tear. I received a branched graft that included a bypass to the celiac artery, the superior mesenteric artery and to the right and left renal arteries. My aneurysm was found by chance–I had not had any previous heart problems or cholesterol problems and was not on any medication. I went to my primary care to get a flu shot and to say that I would finally have the colonoscopy that he had begged me to have for the past 3 years. When I finally agreed to the colonoscopy after turning 60, my primary questioned the change of heart. I explained that I had been experiencing sharp pains that radiated from just below my left breast down to my hip that lasted for about 30 seconds. The pain was not unbearable–but enough to make me take notice. He wisely stated that this did not sound like a colon problem and did an immediate ultrasound in the office. The ultrasound showed an aneurysm in the aortic root. I'm not sure who was more shocked–my doctor or myself. I had walked into the office feeling fine–and ended up taking my first ambulance ride to a Trauma 1 hospital and being placed in the STIC-U. All pre-op tests were performed — but I needed to wait for 2 weeks until the team of 12 could perform the surgery. I can honestly say that those were some of the most worrisome days I have ever experienced waiting for my surgical call at home. I was afraid to do anything except sit and wait. My surgery was performed on Dec.18th–and I was able to go home a week after surgery. I spent 3 months recuperating and have just returned to work. There are angels that watch over us–you are quite lucky to have the option of waiting for surgery, for most who have this disease dissect and need emergency surgery. God bless you! I hope you can continue to be monitored and medically managed.

Liked by Drew944

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You really were blessed and guided. I pray if anything changes I would get that same care. In the mean time I pray for my body to heal itself.

Liked by Drew944

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@modafi

I had an open repair for a thoracoabdominal aneurysm that produced a 5.7cm tear. I received a branched graft that included a bypass to the celiac artery, the superior mesenteric artery and to the right and left renal arteries. My aneurysm was found by chance–I had not had any previous heart problems or cholesterol problems and was not on any medication. I went to my primary care to get a flu shot and to say that I would finally have the colonoscopy that he had begged me to have for the past 3 years. When I finally agreed to the colonoscopy after turning 60, my primary questioned the change of heart. I explained that I had been experiencing sharp pains that radiated from just below my left breast down to my hip that lasted for about 30 seconds. The pain was not unbearable–but enough to make me take notice. He wisely stated that this did not sound like a colon problem and did an immediate ultrasound in the office. The ultrasound showed an aneurysm in the aortic root. I'm not sure who was more shocked–my doctor or myself. I had walked into the office feeling fine–and ended up taking my first ambulance ride to a Trauma 1 hospital and being placed in the STIC-U. All pre-op tests were performed — but I needed to wait for 2 weeks until the team of 12 could perform the surgery. I can honestly say that those were some of the most worrisome days I have ever experienced waiting for my surgical call at home. I was afraid to do anything except sit and wait. My surgery was performed on Dec.18th–and I was able to go home a week after surgery. I spent 3 months recuperating and have just returned to work. There are angels that watch over us–you are quite lucky to have the option of waiting for surgery, for most who have this disease dissect and need emergency surgery. God bless you! I hope you can continue to be monitored and medically managed.

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Wow, you are truly blessed, with an amazing primary care doc and someone up above was watching over you. Bless you and enjoy life. Meanwhile, I will continue to be monitored and pray that nothing changes for both my son and I. We both have the aneursym on our aortic bridge.

Liked by Drew944

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@twocents

Wow, you are truly blessed, with an amazing primary care doc and someone up above was watching over you. Bless you and enjoy life. Meanwhile, I will continue to be monitored and pray that nothing changes for both my son and I. We both have the aneursym on our aortic bridge.

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Wow is right , gives me hope , speaking of I wonder if from time to time it may help when feeling down which is daily for me if a voice on the other side may help. Hard to cope – will I be there for my babies or die before they grow up. What will my story be and how do I prepare them. I frequently go through these blogs looking at all the wonderful posts. If so let me know and can give phone number.

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@Drew944

Wow is right , gives me hope , speaking of I wonder if from time to time it may help when feeling down which is daily for me if a voice on the other side may help. Hard to cope – will I be there for my babies or die before they grow up. What will my story be and how do I prepare them. I frequently go through these blogs looking at all the wonderful posts. If so let me know and can give phone number.

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I’m sorry that was negative – I have my moments – trying to be positive

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Hi everyone,

I'd like to invite you to join us today, Monday, April 29th at 12 p.m. CT for a video Q&A with Dr. Hector Michelena, cardiologist, Dr. Gabor Bagameri, cardiovascular surgeon, and Dr. Alberto Pochettino, cardiovascular surgeon, about watchful waiting for thoracic aortic aneurysms.

Simply click on the link below, for details and to take part in the video Q&A live.
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/webinar/video-qa-about-thoracic-aortic-aneurysms/

Drs. Michelena, Bagameri, and Pochettino will answer questions live. Post your questions before and during the broadcast.

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when I click on the link it just brings me to a page that says video Q & A about Thoracic….. is that the correct page and will the webinar come up on that? will there actually be a video or is it just written questions and answers that will be on there? Thanks

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@twocents

when I click on the link it just brings me to a page that says video Q & A about Thoracic….. is that the correct page and will the webinar come up on that? will there actually be a video or is it just written questions and answers that will be on there? Thanks

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Hi @twocents,

The video will appear on that page https://connect.mayoclinic.org/webinar/video-qa-about-thoracic-aortic-aneurysms/ as soon as it goes live – 12pm, CT.

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Thank you!

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@degarden_girl

@Drew944 I think you are trying to find a way to blame something you did for this aneurysm but it may not be anything you did but just a genetic weakness in the aorta. In any case, don't spend time trying to find an answer to a question that doesn't need to be asked. You have an aneurysm, you can't change that and all you can do is assure your cardio is monitoring it and that you are following the cardio's direction about what you should and should not do. It is important to keep your blood pressure under control as elevated blood pressure can put pressure on that weak spot in the aorta. If you smoke, stop right now. I believe that an aneurysm can remain stable and not in need of surgical repair for years and years and years. Not sure about "forever".

The longer we can remain stable, the more likely there will be a different and less invasive repair available. And the more likely that something else will "get us" before we need a repair. Our bodies age and we won't live forever; our best bet is to follow the cardio's direction and enjoy our lives. We don't "win" by worrying.

And if down the road I do need surgical repair, I will have it done and be grateful that medical science has advanced to the point that such repair can be done with a positive outcome. And if I get really, really old and perhaps not likely to survive such a surgical procedure, there is another procedure already available for placing a stent in the aorta to add strength.

I will not let this diagnosis steal my joy in life and you shouldn't either. You have children who need you to be joyful and not consumed with (unnecessarily) worrying about this. Place your trust in your cardiologist and he will alert you if you need to do anything further.

I wish you well.

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Hi just had year appointment and found out stable and mild and that it’s a bicuspid valve. I’m surprised Kaiser didn’t catch it. Hope your well.

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Hi Drew, I am so happy that the aneurysm is stable. This can continue as just a stable abnormality for the rest of your life. I am sure your cardio is continuing to monitor the situation and will advise you as to what changes in lifestyle might be advisable. The cardio might also suggest medications; last year my cardio placed me on metoprolol, half tablet, to reduce any pressure on the aneurysm to help keep it stable.

Continue to enjoy your life; don't worry about something you can't change. The bicuspid valve might have been a contributing factor to your situation and that formed early in vitro. Nothing you could have done to change that so don't blame yourself for anything.

I wish you continued good health.

Donna

Liked by Drew944

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