Heart Rhythm Conditions – Welcome to the group

Welcome to the Heart Rhythm Conditions group on Mayo Clinic Connect.
Did you know that the average heart beats 100,000 times a day? Millions of people live with heart rhythm problems (heart arrhythmias) which occur when the electrical impulses that coordinate heartbeats don’t work properly. Let’s connect with each other; we can share stories and learn about coping with the challenges, and living well with abnormal heart rhythms. I invite you to follow the group. Simply click the +FOLLOW icon on the group landing page.

I’m Kanaaz (@kanaazpereira), and I’m the moderator of this group. When you post to this group, chances are you’ll also be greeted by volunteer patient Mentors and fellow members. Learn more about Moderators and Mentors on Connect.

Let’s chat. Why not start by introducing yourself?

@anxiety

Good afternoon everyone! My name is Susan.
I have been having palpitations for about 2 years now. I am followed by my family doctor who reassurred me that it is benign. I was referred to a cardiologist & 24h holter monitor. Was even in ER at one point for P: 140. Had cardiac enzymes, CXR, and serial ECG's. These all confirmed that my symptoms are related to my anxiety.

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I feel your pain, I suffer from anxiety with palpitations , recently started on Zoloft which is helping out a lot, good luck,

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@scardycat

I feel your pain, I suffer from anxiety with palpitations , recently started on Zoloft which is helping out a lot, good luck,

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Thanks Scardycat, Success101 & Balubeje for your support. It means a lot to me. Comforting to know that I am not the only one going through this.
Physician had prescribed me Ativan as a last resort if I feel overwhelmed. Still in my drawer, have not needed it yet. He was concerned that because of my symptoms, I was avoiding social activities.
So, I consulted a psychologist. I should have done that a long time ago. She allowed me to verbalize about issues that I have kept secret & choking me. Helped a lot. Now, I have been going out & seeing friends again. And, yes. Certain foods are a definite trigger. Chocolate for me.

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Hello, I’m responding to this discussion & appreciating the information. Have PM 3 years, mid sixties and active. I am experiencing recent significant increase in palpitations, feeling like I’m anxious but am not, feeling like I’m on the top floor dropping to the first with no stops. I am wearing 30 day event monitor to sort this out. I would like to hear more about what I can control without medication. Sounds like stress, caffeine, alcohol all increase symptoms. Could you add more about this, such as diet besides chocolate, already gave that up😩. Does the one cup of coffee have to go? Wine with dinner too? My goal is to avoid blood thinners or other health impacting medication. TY

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@lmclaugh

Hello, I’m responding to this discussion & appreciating the information. Have PM 3 years, mid sixties and active. I am experiencing recent significant increase in palpitations, feeling like I’m anxious but am not, feeling like I’m on the top floor dropping to the first with no stops. I am wearing 30 day event monitor to sort this out. I would like to hear more about what I can control without medication. Sounds like stress, caffeine, alcohol all increase symptoms. Could you add more about this, such as diet besides chocolate, already gave that up😩. Does the one cup of coffee have to go? Wine with dinner too? My goal is to avoid blood thinners or other health impacting medication. TY

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Hello
In my mid 60s I went through the halter monitoring. My stress
Was little higher then.
Drank a lot of diet Coke
Iced coffee. Boy, that,
Tipped it all off. Had
A A fib attack.
I was certainly, fearful then.
Came out of it In, 26hrs.
Changed my lifestyle.
Completely, off soda,
Drink half half coffee.
The acids are the hard
Ones. Tomatoes, garlic
Onion. And, rich foods.
Walking is the key also.
And, good medical
Supervision.
Cardiology.

You can do this. It is
Just a curve in our
Living.
And, yes a glass of
Wine goes good with
Dinner .
I don't care to eat a full
Meal in evening.
That too is hard on me.
This is all my
Opinion and, I
Wish you well. Success101

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@lmclaugh

Hello, I’m responding to this discussion & appreciating the information. Have PM 3 years, mid sixties and active. I am experiencing recent significant increase in palpitations, feeling like I’m anxious but am not, feeling like I’m on the top floor dropping to the first with no stops. I am wearing 30 day event monitor to sort this out. I would like to hear more about what I can control without medication. Sounds like stress, caffeine, alcohol all increase symptoms. Could you add more about this, such as diet besides chocolate, already gave that up😩. Does the one cup of coffee have to go? Wine with dinner too? My goal is to avoid blood thinners or other health impacting medication. TY

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You are me one year ago. I gave up all alcohol except for one glass of wine with dinner about once a month. I found that dehydration, too much salt, soda, high altitude, and stimulating social situations such as a dinner with a lot of people can cause Afib in me. I almost always get it in the evening when I’m tired. Had Afib once every 2 weeks or so throughout the year. Didn’t last long, maybe 5-30 minutes each time, but was very concerning to me. After a year of trying to reduce and manage this, last week I gave in and have started Losartan (for blood pressure) and Eliquis (blood thinner). When the doctor said “we can replace blood but we can’t replace brain cells”, when my friend told me not to end up like her father who lived 10 awful years after and stroke, and when I learned of another friend who was thin and very physically fit who takes the same med, I decided to give it a go. I actually am feeling some relief now that I’ve started. Will reassess in a few months and take it from there. Lose weight, exercise, eat healthy, reduce stress, hydrate.

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@dsisko

You are me one year ago. I gave up all alcohol except for one glass of wine with dinner about once a month. I found that dehydration, too much salt, soda, high altitude, and stimulating social situations such as a dinner with a lot of people can cause Afib in me. I almost always get it in the evening when I’m tired. Had Afib once every 2 weeks or so throughout the year. Didn’t last long, maybe 5-30 minutes each time, but was very concerning to me. After a year of trying to reduce and manage this, last week I gave in and have started Losartan (for blood pressure) and Eliquis (blood thinner). When the doctor said “we can replace blood but we can’t replace brain cells”, when my friend told me not to end up like her father who lived 10 awful years after and stroke, and when I learned of another friend who was thin and very physically fit who takes the same med, I decided to give it a go. I actually am feeling some relief now that I’ve started. Will reassess in a few months and take it from there. Lose weight, exercise, eat healthy, reduce stress, hydrate.

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Thank you to you and success101; I appreciate the information & encouragement. Have a good holiday!

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Hello! I am a 69 year old woman. If I lost 40 pounds I would be in better health and my BP would come down. New Year's resolution!
I do want to share something with your group. That is how I CURED my atrial fibrillation.
I was 46 years old and suddenly developed a cardiac arrhythmia that was so severe that I didn't have 3 steady beats in a row. Consequently, I would feel faint and need to constantly gasp for air. I was seen by a cardiologist who said he had never seen such a severe case of atrial fibrillation and he put me on a beta blocker. Only the highest does of Sotacor (sotalol) 80 mg 4x per day, kept my heart beating steadily but I felt weak and tired all the time; like I was 90 years old! The cardiologist said that this was too high a dose and that it could actually stop my heart and to reduce the dose on my own. But I could not without my heart going haywire. I stayed on that high dose of beta blocker for almost 2 years and I felt very discouraged to feel like an invalid.
I went to a library (no internet then) and did some reading and because vigourous exercise was recommended I decided to join a gym. I went every morning for an hour, 35 minutes of which was very fast walking and gentle running on a treadmill. I very gradually and carefully (very important) managed to reduce the beta blocker dose bit by bit without my heart skipping beats and by the end of a month, I was completely off the beta blocker and my heart was as steady as a rock. I went to the gym every day but Sundays for 4 months and then tapered off to some degree.
I went to see my cardiologist and he was astounded at my 'cure' which is what I called it. But he said, "You cannot just cure AFib. It will come back. I will be seeing you soon." Well, fast forward 23 years to today and no AFib all this time. But…I followed his advice and NEVER drank alcohol, I avoided smokers, never took any stimulants as in decongestant cold medications. When I have needed freezing at the dentist's, I am given a special non stimulating medication. I am careful about supplements. I never have caffeine which is in chocolate, tea, coffee and coke. Even too many carbs can make my heart beat very fast which I perceive as an AFib warning sign. I have cheated on rare occasions over the years and will feel my heart thump a bit which scares me. I have my own treadmill which I go on 3 – 4 days per week. So, I am highly motivated to keep AFib at bay. I certainly do not want to be back on beta blockers. LIFESTYLE is my healthy choice.

Robin small size

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@afrobin

Hello! I am a 69 year old woman. If I lost 40 pounds I would be in better health and my BP would come down. New Year's resolution!
I do want to share something with your group. That is how I CURED my atrial fibrillation.
I was 46 years old and suddenly developed a cardiac arrhythmia that was so severe that I didn't have 3 steady beats in a row. Consequently, I would feel faint and need to constantly gasp for air. I was seen by a cardiologist who said he had never seen such a severe case of atrial fibrillation and he put me on a beta blocker. Only the highest does of Sotacor (sotalol) 80 mg 4x per day, kept my heart beating steadily but I felt weak and tired all the time; like I was 90 years old! The cardiologist said that this was too high a dose and that it could actually stop my heart and to reduce the dose on my own. But I could not without my heart going haywire. I stayed on that high dose of beta blocker for almost 2 years and I felt very discouraged to feel like an invalid.
I went to a library (no internet then) and did some reading and because vigourous exercise was recommended I decided to join a gym. I went every morning for an hour, 35 minutes of which was very fast walking and gentle running on a treadmill. I very gradually and carefully (very important) managed to reduce the beta blocker dose bit by bit without my heart skipping beats and by the end of a month, I was completely off the beta blocker and my heart was as steady as a rock. I went to the gym every day but Sundays for 4 months and then tapered off to some degree.
I went to see my cardiologist and he was astounded at my 'cure' which is what I called it. But he said, "You cannot just cure AFib. It will come back. I will be seeing you soon." Well, fast forward 23 years to today and no AFib all this time. But…I followed his advice and NEVER drank alcohol, I avoided smokers, never took any stimulants as in decongestant cold medications. When I have needed freezing at the dentist's, I am given a special non stimulating medication. I am careful about supplements. I never have caffeine which is in chocolate, tea, coffee and coke. Even too many carbs can make my heart beat very fast which I perceive as an AFib warning sign. I have cheated on rare occasions over the years and will feel my heart thump a bit which scares me. I have my own treadmill which I go on 3 – 4 days per week. So, I am highly motivated to keep AFib at bay. I certainly do not want to be back on beta blockers. LIFESTYLE is my healthy choice.

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Lucija,

If you read any of my posts pay close attention to how I finally got off Carvedilol. It was a long slow weaning, but finally I was free of that med. You can most likely do the same with any med you want to DC, with Doc's permission.

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@afrobin

Hello! I am a 69 year old woman. If I lost 40 pounds I would be in better health and my BP would come down. New Year's resolution!
I do want to share something with your group. That is how I CURED my atrial fibrillation.
I was 46 years old and suddenly developed a cardiac arrhythmia that was so severe that I didn't have 3 steady beats in a row. Consequently, I would feel faint and need to constantly gasp for air. I was seen by a cardiologist who said he had never seen such a severe case of atrial fibrillation and he put me on a beta blocker. Only the highest does of Sotacor (sotalol) 80 mg 4x per day, kept my heart beating steadily but I felt weak and tired all the time; like I was 90 years old! The cardiologist said that this was too high a dose and that it could actually stop my heart and to reduce the dose on my own. But I could not without my heart going haywire. I stayed on that high dose of beta blocker for almost 2 years and I felt very discouraged to feel like an invalid.
I went to a library (no internet then) and did some reading and because vigourous exercise was recommended I decided to join a gym. I went every morning for an hour, 35 minutes of which was very fast walking and gentle running on a treadmill. I very gradually and carefully (very important) managed to reduce the beta blocker dose bit by bit without my heart skipping beats and by the end of a month, I was completely off the beta blocker and my heart was as steady as a rock. I went to the gym every day but Sundays for 4 months and then tapered off to some degree.
I went to see my cardiologist and he was astounded at my 'cure' which is what I called it. But he said, "You cannot just cure AFib. It will come back. I will be seeing you soon." Well, fast forward 23 years to today and no AFib all this time. But…I followed his advice and NEVER drank alcohol, I avoided smokers, never took any stimulants as in decongestant cold medications. When I have needed freezing at the dentist's, I am given a special non stimulating medication. I am careful about supplements. I never have caffeine which is in chocolate, tea, coffee and coke. Even too many carbs can make my heart beat very fast which I perceive as an AFib warning sign. I have cheated on rare occasions over the years and will feel my heart thump a bit which scares me. I have my own treadmill which I go on 3 – 4 days per week. So, I am highly motivated to keep AFib at bay. I certainly do not want to be back on beta blockers. LIFESTYLE is my healthy choice.

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Good story. I wish DRS would not say something is not curable and you'll be back. It locks one in mentally. And maybe the statistics say something, but there are those that do not follow the data, on the edge of the data.
Just returned from a 5 Christmas trip to see my daughter and two granddaughters. 2 days driving 8 hrs each with husband, and 3 days with family, plus bonus Christmas Day/Evening at cousins 2 hr drive through LA traffic and back. Half day at the mall after Christmas, and yes, my heart went out of rhythm night before the drive back, but it was mild. Next night in my own bed, it went out and has been unstable for a couple of days. I am slowly moving about with housework, not talking about it, but just giving it time to recover. Did get an hour massage day Fri while out of rhy, first time doing that, didn't seem to affect it one way or another. No dizziness. Not controlling the salt and sugar etc. might be the problem, and all the changes. Daughter's recent divorce brings sadness, so there are emotions.

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@lmclaugh

Hello, I’m responding to this discussion & appreciating the information. Have PM 3 years, mid sixties and active. I am experiencing recent significant increase in palpitations, feeling like I’m anxious but am not, feeling like I’m on the top floor dropping to the first with no stops. I am wearing 30 day event monitor to sort this out. I would like to hear more about what I can control without medication. Sounds like stress, caffeine, alcohol all increase symptoms. Could you add more about this, such as diet besides chocolate, already gave that up😩. Does the one cup of coffee have to go? Wine with dinner too? My goal is to avoid blood thinners or other health impacting medication. TY

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I wanted to avoid Eliquis (blood thinner), but there is such a risk of stroke with afib it isn't worth the gamble, in my opinion. When I was hospitalized in advanced heart failure at the Mayo Clinic, when they looked at my heart internally with that little camera machine, I had two blood clots lodged in the heart which were stuck. It was the grace of God they weren't released causing a stoke etc. Its' a mystery, just wasn't my time to leave, not done yet. I'm one of those who will do just about everything to avoid meds. But at 71, I've had to surrender and be grateful that there are so many amazing meds for us. I kept the choc and gave up the wine and coffee. Your tastes change and you can explore the more subtle taste of herb teas. And it's okay to sniff coffee. Salt is a biggie, cut way back. Make your own food.

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@healthytoday

I wanted to avoid Eliquis (blood thinner), but there is such a risk of stroke with afib it isn't worth the gamble, in my opinion. When I was hospitalized in advanced heart failure at the Mayo Clinic, when they looked at my heart internally with that little camera machine, I had two blood clots lodged in the heart which were stuck. It was the grace of God they weren't released causing a stoke etc. Its' a mystery, just wasn't my time to leave, not done yet. I'm one of those who will do just about everything to avoid meds. But at 71, I've had to surrender and be grateful that there are so many amazing meds for us. I kept the choc and gave up the wine and coffee. Your tastes change and you can explore the more subtle taste of herb teas. And it's okay to sniff coffee. Salt is a biggie, cut way back. Make your own food.

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Southwest Christmas tree.

12090002

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@chris24

Hi, my name is Chris. I was diagnosed with Afib & mild congestive heart failure

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The good news is drs know alot about the heart. And lot's of us have afib etc. It's a change of life course.

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@healthytoday

The good news is drs know alot about the heart. And lot's of us have afib etc. It's a change of life course.

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Southwest Christmas cat.

PC100001

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@healthytoday

Southwest Christmas tree.

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Wondering @healthytoday whether this Southwest Xmas tree is growing on the lawn of the Scottsdale Mayo Clinic. If so, you're most fortunate. Martin

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@predictable

Wondering @healthytoday whether this Southwest Xmas tree is growing on the lawn of the Scottsdale Mayo Clinic. If so, you're most fortunate. Martin

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No, this is a window display plastic model of a Saguaro I picked up at a yard sale one day while visiting Phoenix. I turned it into my plastic Christmas Tree, and since I love the southwest art style. wallahh!
And it's not likely you'll find any "lawn". You must be a northern person. Rocks and cacti is the decor and a bed of rose bushes.

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