Heart Rhythm Conditions – Welcome to the group

Welcome to the Heart Rhythm Conditions group on Mayo Clinic Connect.
Did you know that the average heart beats 100,000 times a day? Millions of people live with heart rhythm problems (heart arrhythmias) which occur when the electrical impulses that coordinate heartbeats don’t work properly. Let’s connect with each other; we can share stories and learn about coping with the challenges, and living well with abnormal heart rhythms. I invite you to follow the group. Simply click the +FOLLOW icon on the group landing page.

I’m Kanaaz (@kanaazpereira), and I’m the moderator of this group. When you post to this group, chances are you’ll also be greeted by volunteer patient Mentors and fellow members. Learn more about Moderators and Mentors on Connect.

Let’s chat. Why not start by introducing yourself?

@tresjur

I was on Warfarin for 14 years, with no problems. Honestly, I would still be on it had I not experienced several bleeds resulting in 8 transfusions and a stay in ICU. My body just could no longer tolerate the blood thinners. The following 3 years I took nothing for the A-Fib. Yes, very risky and extremely scary worrying about a possible stroke.

Three years after the ICU incident I saw the Watchman ad on television stating it was for people with atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem (me) and could not tolerate blood thinners (me, again). I discussed this with my cardiologist, had a TEE to insure that I was a good candidate and was referred to an electrophysiologist for evaluation and confirmation.

As for Eliquis, the only time I took it was after the implantation. I took it for 6 months only, followed by a low-dose aspirin daily for life. From the Watchman website you will learn that this is the the protocol for the device.

This is my A-Fib story and the implant is working for me so far. I'm also living with other heart ailments, sleep apnea, arthritis and cancer. If you are interested in the Watchman do your due diligence and talk to your cardiologist and/or medical team. I don't know your medical history nor am qualified to suggest that this what you need or would work for you.

Tresjur

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Thanks for sharing. I did go look the devise up and learned it is an incredibly simple solution to the problem you had.

I have PVCs and do not have the clothing you have. I only take a regular aspirin for blood thinning and give blood every 8 weeks or so to help further thin my blood. Seems to work sell so far.

Liked by Tresjur

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@eileena

Thanks for sharing. I did go look the devise up and learned it is an incredibly simple solution to the problem you had.

I have PVCs and do not have the clothing you have. I only take a regular aspirin for blood thinning and give blood every 8 weeks or so to help further thin my blood. Seems to work sell so far.

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Eileena,

It was a pleasure to share my experiences with A-Fib treatments with you. I'm also pleased to learn that you have your condition under control and the treatment you are receiving is working for you.

Tresjur

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Hello, I am Wally. This is my first visit to the Mayo connect site. I am a long time arrhythmia patient with some unique circumstances.

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Approximately 30 yrs ago I was diagnosed with AFib, Cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. The medicine prescription at this time was coreg, enalapril, Pradaxa and baby aspirin. Because my ejection fraction was 20, I received an implanted pacemaker defibrillator in 2001 An additional drug was prescribed named rythmol which kept me in sinus rhythm for most of 8 years. However, there were approximately three or four episodes of AFib that occurred during this time which required cardioversion and a dosage adjustment of rythmol. My ejection fraction had improved to the high 40's. Rythmol eventually became ineffective and was replaced with amiodarone after a cardioversion was performed. Three years of amiodarone kept me in sinus rhythm until the drug attacked my thyroid and had to be stopped. Ejection fraction had decreased to 30 and created an episode of ventricular tachycardia which was corrected by a shock from the ICD The decision in December 2015 was to replace the original pacemaker/defibrillator with a Bi-V device to assist with the lower chamber pumping efficiency but did not correct AFib. The drug Sotalol was added. In March 2016 I experienced another episode of V Tach and was corrected by the ICD and converted me to sinus rhythm. Since March 2016 I have been in sinus rhythm. The prescription menu includes coreg, Pradaxa, sotalol, atorvastatin, furosemide, potassium and magnesium for the heart. January 2018 I experienced three V Tach episodes within a two week period and all corrected by the ICD. Since then I have had lightheadedness, headaches, vision changes, sore eyes, some nausea and some fatigue. I have had all the tests many times, i.e. echocardiogram, cardiac cath, ekg's. No artery disease, no blockage found. I had gone thru an electrophysiology study of the heart to attempt to find the cause of the V-Tach without any negative findings. Never had an ablation I have never had a heart attack. A scan of the head was performed as a possible cause of the head complaints. Head scan was negative. The cardiologist feels my head issues are probably caused by the medication but is reluctant to change because I have been without incident since January 2018. I feel my options are getting another opinion from Mayo or living with feeling as though you are in a fog, looking thru dirty glasses. Lightheadedness is not pleasant.

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@marlynkay

Approximately 30 yrs ago I was diagnosed with AFib, Cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. The medicine prescription at this time was coreg, enalapril, Pradaxa and baby aspirin. Because my ejection fraction was 20, I received an implanted pacemaker defibrillator in 2001 An additional drug was prescribed named rythmol which kept me in sinus rhythm for most of 8 years. However, there were approximately three or four episodes of AFib that occurred during this time which required cardioversion and a dosage adjustment of rythmol. My ejection fraction had improved to the high 40's. Rythmol eventually became ineffective and was replaced with amiodarone after a cardioversion was performed. Three years of amiodarone kept me in sinus rhythm until the drug attacked my thyroid and had to be stopped. Ejection fraction had decreased to 30 and created an episode of ventricular tachycardia which was corrected by a shock from the ICD The decision in December 2015 was to replace the original pacemaker/defibrillator with a Bi-V device to assist with the lower chamber pumping efficiency but did not correct AFib. The drug Sotalol was added. In March 2016 I experienced another episode of V Tach and was corrected by the ICD and converted me to sinus rhythm. Since March 2016 I have been in sinus rhythm. The prescription menu includes coreg, Pradaxa, sotalol, atorvastatin, furosemide, potassium and magnesium for the heart. January 2018 I experienced three V Tach episodes within a two week period and all corrected by the ICD. Since then I have had lightheadedness, headaches, vision changes, sore eyes, some nausea and some fatigue. I have had all the tests many times, i.e. echocardiogram, cardiac cath, ekg's. No artery disease, no blockage found. I had gone thru an electrophysiology study of the heart to attempt to find the cause of the V-Tach without any negative findings. Never had an ablation I have never had a heart attack. A scan of the head was performed as a possible cause of the head complaints. Head scan was negative. The cardiologist feels my head issues are probably caused by the medication but is reluctant to change because I have been without incident since January 2018. I feel my options are getting another opinion from Mayo or living with feeling as though you are in a fog, looking thru dirty glasses. Lightheadedness is not pleasant.

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You have really gone through your share of symptoms and various drugs to remedy your condition. I have similar issues, although my ejection fraction was excellent, 60. I understand anything over 50 is good. All I know is that I have these three or so conditions, and they all seem to be electrical in nature, and like you no artery disease at this time. Since the drugs don't seem to be lowering my blood pressure, and my symptoms have continued, I'm not really sure what is next. And, like you have mentioned, sort of living out of yourself is not pleasant.

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@marlynkay

Approximately 30 yrs ago I was diagnosed with AFib, Cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. The medicine prescription at this time was coreg, enalapril, Pradaxa and baby aspirin. Because my ejection fraction was 20, I received an implanted pacemaker defibrillator in 2001 An additional drug was prescribed named rythmol which kept me in sinus rhythm for most of 8 years. However, there were approximately three or four episodes of AFib that occurred during this time which required cardioversion and a dosage adjustment of rythmol. My ejection fraction had improved to the high 40's. Rythmol eventually became ineffective and was replaced with amiodarone after a cardioversion was performed. Three years of amiodarone kept me in sinus rhythm until the drug attacked my thyroid and had to be stopped. Ejection fraction had decreased to 30 and created an episode of ventricular tachycardia which was corrected by a shock from the ICD The decision in December 2015 was to replace the original pacemaker/defibrillator with a Bi-V device to assist with the lower chamber pumping efficiency but did not correct AFib. The drug Sotalol was added. In March 2016 I experienced another episode of V Tach and was corrected by the ICD and converted me to sinus rhythm. Since March 2016 I have been in sinus rhythm. The prescription menu includes coreg, Pradaxa, sotalol, atorvastatin, furosemide, potassium and magnesium for the heart. January 2018 I experienced three V Tach episodes within a two week period and all corrected by the ICD. Since then I have had lightheadedness, headaches, vision changes, sore eyes, some nausea and some fatigue. I have had all the tests many times, i.e. echocardiogram, cardiac cath, ekg's. No artery disease, no blockage found. I had gone thru an electrophysiology study of the heart to attempt to find the cause of the V-Tach without any negative findings. Never had an ablation I have never had a heart attack. A scan of the head was performed as a possible cause of the head complaints. Head scan was negative. The cardiologist feels my head issues are probably caused by the medication but is reluctant to change because I have been without incident since January 2018. I feel my options are getting another opinion from Mayo or living with feeling as though you are in a fog, looking thru dirty glasses. Lightheadedness is not pleasant.

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@marlynkay
Hi Wally, your medical history is worth reading it several times ! . I want to be sure, if I understood everything properly. I'm a pacemaker recipien myself, but a different one. they implanted a two chamber-pacemaker (two electrodes, one in the right atrium and one in the right chamber/ventricel). I read that you got a ICD 2001, which was replaced by a CRT-ICD 2015 (to resynchronize the two chambers of your heart). my question is, how did they replace them? do you know that?
yoanne

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@yoanne

@marlynkay
Hi Wally, your medical history is worth reading it several times ! . I want to be sure, if I understood everything properly. I'm a pacemaker recipien myself, but a different one. they implanted a two chamber-pacemaker (two electrodes, one in the right atrium and one in the right chamber/ventricel). I read that you got a ICD 2001, which was replaced by a CRT-ICD 2015 (to resynchronize the two chambers of your heart). my question is, how did they replace them? do you know that?
yoanne

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Hello yoanne, thanks for your interest in my history, it is a bit lengthy and complex. I received the original Medtronic's pacemaker defibrillator in 2001. It is configured as you described, i.e. one lead in the atrium, the other in the ventricular chamber. The defibrillator portion is programmed to deliver a shock if the pacing of the heart exceeds the set parameters established by the doctors technicians. In 2015 the old device was replaced by a Bi ventricular pacemaker defibrillator, identified as a Medtronic's Viva Quad XT CRT. The original wires in the right atrium and right ventricle remained in place and were connected to the new device. A third lead was attached to the left ventricle and connected to the device to assist with the pumping efficiency of the lower chamber. This modification was done in a surgical procedure while I was totally sedated. The decision to install the Bi V device was made to improve the low ejection fraction. Hopefully this explanation provides the information you were asking about. Thanks again for your interest.

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@eileena

Thanks for sharing. I did go look the devise up and learned it is an incredibly simple solution to the problem you had.

I have PVCs and do not have the clothing you have. I only take a regular aspirin for blood thinning and give blood every 8 weeks or so to help further thin my blood. Seems to work sell so far.

Jump to this post

Hi I am Kancha. I was admitted in the hospital to take Tikosyn ( for arterial fibrillation) on 19 th after three capsules I am in my sinus rhythm ( after a year the heart rate has come to normal ) I will be taking two more pills and then will go back home after three days. It was a big risk to decide to take this medicine as it could take me to extreme higher arthemia. Thankfully I did not go through it. No much side effects so far. I wonder why this medicine was not tried before. I am so happy that I tried it and hope my fibrillation does not come back.

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@kancha

Hi I am Kancha. I was admitted in the hospital to take Tikosyn ( for arterial fibrillation) on 19 th after three capsules I am in my sinus rhythm ( after a year the heart rate has come to normal ) I will be taking two more pills and then will go back home after three days. It was a big risk to decide to take this medicine as it could take me to extreme higher arthemia. Thankfully I did not go through it. No much side effects so far. I wonder why this medicine was not tried before. I am so happy that I tried it and hope my fibrillation does not come back.

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Welcome Kancha.

It is good the med worked for you.

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Hi, my name is Betty and I am 70. I have a history of atrial fib for more than 16 years. The last 4 years it is constant. I had a mechanical mitral valve replacement in 2003 due to damage from rheumatic fever in the 1960s. Recently I have developed ventricular bigeminy superimposed on the atrial fib. Has anyone else had a ventricular Arrhythmia at the same time as atrial fib…and if so, what did you do?

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My name is Jessie I am 30 had laser surgery to shock my heart when I was 13. Due to an irregular heart beat. Was in track (running)when it got bad I am currently going thru a marijuana withdrawal and had a stressful event happen during. My heart has been pounding off and on since. No real chest pain and no fainting. Its been about a week. Been researching but not getting any clear answers. I don't have health insurance and don't want to pay out of pocket unless it is last resort. Wondering if anyone would know the chances if it will go away on its own? Thanks in advance

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Hi, my name is Chris. I was diagnosed with Afib & mild congestive heart failure

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Good afternoon everyone! My name is Susan.
I have been having palpitations for about 2 years now. I am followed by my family doctor who reassurred me that it is benign. I was referred to a cardiologist & 24h holter monitor. Was even in ER at one point for P: 140. Had cardiac enzymes, CXR, and serial ECG's. These all confirmed that my symptoms are related to my anxiety.

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Susan-my suggestion would be to get out in nature and take a walk daily of course with your Physicians approval.

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Hi Susan
I hear your anxiety. I too have had
It for years. Calmness meditation
Walking all work well.
Since getting older, I feel keeping
A Cardiologist is very important.
I am now on a bloodthinner.
Due to A fib. The two I had
Came through in synnes rhythm.
I think, diet too. Certain, foods can
bring your palpitations on.
Perhaps a thorough check up
In all areas is necessary.
Good luck
Success101

Liked by Soliloquized

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