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debbee
@debbee

Posts: 6
Joined: Sep 05, 2016

New to Afib, warfarin and metoprolol (beta blocker)

Posted by @debbee, Sep 4, 2016

Hello – I’m an otherwise healthy 55 year old female, diagnosed with afib 1.5 years ago. The dr. that diagnosed it immediately prescribed warfarin and metoprolol. My regular dr. was away at the time, and when she returned 3 months later, she said “I probably would have only put you on aspirin” – because I am otherwise healthy. No other risk of stroke, my bp is fine, blood sugar is fine, no history of heart attack, etc. But she decided to run the tests and try to determine my afib trigger, so I have since had an echo to check my heart’s mechanical health (its good), sleep apnea test (I have mild, and am now on a device that treats it), and I’ve quite drinking alcohol. I saw an internist that decided I had alcohol induced afib. However, I suspect that my afib may also be triggered by hormone fluctuations caused by the peri-menopause I’m going through, but every dr. I’ve suggested it to says probably not, hard to prove. Ever since I was put on the 2 meds, I have been asking to get off them. “My” dr. wanted me to go through all the tests, and then decide. I live in a small remote town, and “my” dr. only works half time, so I am constantly seeing a new dr. The last new dr. I had basically said I have no choice but to stay on the drugs. She actually said the words “why do you want to get off the meds”. I’m still flabbergasted. I’ve refused to go back and see that one. I have an appt. this week with yet another dr. to review my sleep apnea results, and maybe since it’s under control, I will be able to get off the warfarin. But what about the beta blocker? Has anyone every been on warfarin and a beta blocker, and then been able to get off both of them?
I HATE being on these meds. But obviously I don’t want a stroke either.

Liked by wandamiller

REPLY

@debbee,hello!
please read the following link: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Arrhythmia/AboutArrhythmia/Treatment-Guidelines-of-Atrial-Fibrillation-AFib-or-AF_UCM_423779_Article.jsp
the need for anticoagulation depends of your CHA2DS2–VASc risk.. after reading you will be entirely informed ,and you are able to discuss your treatment better with the doctors.

Special thanks @yoanne for the reference to the Heart Association’s guidelines on A-fib diagnosis and treatment and the Internet link to bring them up to read. On that page is another link that takes us to an online tool for calculating your risk of a stroke from A-fib and the need for anticoagulation therapy. Here’s that link to that page: http://www.heartinteractives.org/afib5/activities/MAE-CHA2DS2VASc/Interactive2-MAE.html. As @yoanne advises, print those two pages and take them with you to discuss them with your cardiologist(s).

The tool recommends that I take a “blood thinner,” although my risk of a stroke is based only on my age (over 65) and my hypertension. I need an anticoagulant even though I am not experiencing congestive heart failure, diabetes, prior stroke, or vascular disease and am not a woman.

I take a medium dose of Coumadin daily and stop by the lab for 15 minutes once a month. Staying in tune with the coagulation index is no problem for me or for my 83-year-old friend, who has been on Coumadin for 10 years and tracks his index at home with a special device. I also take a beta blocker (Carvedilol), mainly for my hypertension, but also as a prophylactic for my A-fib. My medication regimen is a joint therapy of my cardiologist (who knows the heart) and my nephrologist (an expert on hypertension).

Hi @debbee, I also add my welcome.
You may also be interested in reading and joining this discussion on Connect called “AFib questions” http://mayocl.in/29iD8aJ There’s a lot of information shared amongst members there.

I certainly sympathize. I’m on metoprolol and Eliquis and i resisted both. All my doctors say they’re low dose amounts, that i am at risk because of heart disease ( i had bypass surgery), and of course they believe meds are downright good for you. I finally went on metoprolol but at half dose. And i’m continuing to study, thru diet or lifestyle changes, how i can safely eliminate them. Your situation sounds better than mine so i’m sure there’s a solution for you. But it will require a change in doctors.

Visit the websites for the doctors wolfson and dr sinatra (Google them). They present alternatives. Jack Juraco

@yoanne

@debbee,hello!
please read the following link: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Arrhythmia/AboutArrhythmia/Treatment-Guidelines-of-Atrial-Fibrillation-AFib-or-AF_UCM_423779_Article.jsp
the need for anticoagulation depends of your CHA2DS2–VASc risk.. after reading you will be entirely informed ,and you are able to discuss your treatment better with the doctors.

Jump to this post

Thank you @yoanne. I wasn’t clear in my post, my CHA2DS2-VASc risk is 1. And after my dr.s appt. today, I am now OFF warfarin, and on a baby aspirin. I’m thrilled. The beta blocker though is another story. I have to be monitored as I ween off it, but am going to be out of the country off and on for the next 7 months, so have to wait on that one.

@colleenyoung

Hi @debbee, I also add my welcome.
You may also be interested in reading and joining this discussion on Connect called “AFib questions” http://mayocl.in/29iD8aJ There’s a lot of information shared amongst members there.

Jump to this post

Thanks @colleenyoung. Yes I scrolled through there, and it was helpful!

@predictable

Special thanks @yoanne for the reference to the Heart Association’s guidelines on A-fib diagnosis and treatment and the Internet link to bring them up to read. On that page is another link that takes us to an online tool for calculating your risk of a stroke from A-fib and the need for anticoagulation therapy. Here’s that link to that page: http://www.heartinteractives.org/afib5/activities/MAE-CHA2DS2VASc/Interactive2-MAE.html. As @yoanne advises, print those two pages and take them with you to discuss them with your cardiologist(s).

The tool recommends that I take a “blood thinner,” although my risk of a stroke is based only on my age (over 65) and my hypertension. I need an anticoagulant even though I am not experiencing congestive heart failure, diabetes, prior stroke, or vascular disease and am not a woman.

I take a medium dose of Coumadin daily and stop by the lab for 15 minutes once a month. Staying in tune with the coagulation index is no problem for me or for my 83-year-old friend, who has been on Coumadin for 10 years and tracks his index at home with a special device. I also take a beta blocker (Carvedilol), mainly for my hypertension, but also as a prophylactic for my A-fib. My medication regimen is a joint therapy of my cardiologist (who knows the heart) and my nephrologist (an expert on hypertension).

Jump to this post

Thank you @predictable. Yes, I wasn’t clear in my post, I’ve done that risk assessment, I’m a one. This was why I was frustrated with being on the warfarin. And, as I said in my reply above, as of today, I am now off it, thank goodness. Baby aspirin now.

Thank you @jackj, I will google them.
As of today I’m off the warfarin, but still on the metoprolol, for now. Have you heard of the Australian Legacy study, Long-Term Effect of Goal-Directed Weight Management in an Atrial Fibrillation ? It’s more evidence of lifestyle changes that could influence afib.
http://content.onlinejacc.org/data/Journals/JAC/934063/03002.pdf

@yoanne

@debbee,hello!
please read the following link: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Arrhythmia/AboutArrhythmia/Treatment-Guidelines-of-Atrial-Fibrillation-AFib-or-AF_UCM_423779_Article.jsp
the need for anticoagulation depends of your CHA2DS2–VASc risk.. after reading you will be entirely informed ,and you are able to discuss your treatment better with the doctors.

Jump to this post

Thank you @yoanne. I wasn’t clear in my post, I know my CHA2DS2-VASc risk, it’s one.
And as of today, I’m off the warfarin!! Yayay! But still on the metoprolol, I have to be monitored to get off that, but will be in and out of the country for the next few months so have to wait till I’m back to do that. 1 down, 1 to go.

@yoanne

@debbee,hello!
please read the following link: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Arrhythmia/AboutArrhythmia/Treatment-Guidelines-of-Atrial-Fibrillation-AFib-or-AF_UCM_423779_Article.jsp
the need for anticoagulation depends of your CHA2DS2–VASc risk.. after reading you will be entirely informed ,and you are able to discuss your treatment better with the doctors.

Jump to this post

@debbee, hello!
I can imagine that you are relieved. it is according to the guidelines.I started with 100 mg aspirin as well, because I was younger than 65 and had no other risks. metoprolol is meant to keep the heart rate within certain limits it does not prevent A-Fib’s, ,but it makes the A-Fib. more bearable.(less dizziness for example).

I don’t think i have. Will check it out. Thx

@jackj

I certainly sympathize. I’m on metoprolol and Eliquis and i resisted both. All my doctors say they’re low dose amounts, that i am at risk because of heart disease ( i had bypass surgery), and of course they believe meds are downright good for you. I finally went on metoprolol but at half dose. And i’m continuing to study, thru diet or lifestyle changes, how i can safely eliminate them. Your situation sounds better than mine so i’m sure there’s a solution for you. But it will require a change in doctors.

Visit the websites for the doctors wolfson and dr sinatra (Google them). They present alternatives. Jack Juraco

Jump to this post

I had quadruple heart bypass surgery in 2002 and in 2004 was put on metropolol. After about 6 months I realized that I had been feeling sluggish for sometime and so I stopped the last medication I was on which was the metropolol and the next time I saw the cardio dr. I reported that to him and he agreed that the metropolol was the problem. A couple of years ago my blood pressure was out of whack and the dr. gave me the new blood pressure medication with 3 types of medicine to treat hypertension. It also made me sluggish and my blood pressure was lower so I tried it for another 3 months and went back to valsartan which I had taken since my surgery. I still take the valsartan and of course the statin drug, atorvastatin which I have been on since before the heart bypass surgery. I went from 10mg of statin drug to 40mg after the surgery and still take 40mg Those two medications work for me with no side effects that I can tell. I do exercise regularly and it has become a lifestyle change for me. Would probably be easy to give it up but I am very sure it has more benefits than the medications I take. I have three younger brothers and we all have heart disease so I also believe it is genetic. My dad never had heart surgery, stents or anything except a statin drug and he died of congestive heart failure. We could not tell that he ever had an ekg either but now we are pretty sure he had heart disease also. Think you just have to listen to your body and of course always, always consult with your cardiologist. Most have online charts now and PA to advise you. I have learned more from the PA’s than the doctors. I do not take certain cold medications with dyphenhydromine in them and many of the allergy medications are not recommended to me. It is amazing to me how many medications can interfere with blood pressure and heart disease so you always need to ask even about over the counter stuff. I also go regularly to my internal medicine dr. and my cardiologist and have all the recommended blood work and tests. I usually have an ekg and an echo test from the cardio dr. and all the blood tests from the internist. I have an oline chart called “my chart” and my doctors and nurses have access to it so they know exactly what my test results show and what medications I take. If they want to add a medication, I do question that decision and decide if I want to try it or not. When I am having problems or feeling bad and think it might be the medicine I only remove one and if that doesn’t work I start taking it again and remove another one. I would never quit the statin drug. It seems to be the gold standard for heart disease and fortunately I tolerate it well. Hope this helps a little. Oh, I am 74 and was 60 when I had the bypass surgery so I say it worked. Was pretty sick before the surgery and still remember that feeling. Also had heart attack in 1991 and that is when I started a statin drug and quit smoking. Smoked for 35 years before that so I’m sure I have lasting damage from that. I believe you have to take charge of your medical care and ask lots of question of your doctors. If they do not have time for you, change doctors.

Hello I am about to go on warfarin for a month and have cardioversion for afib

Has anyone had cardioversion?

@yoanne

@debbee,hello!
please read the following link: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Arrhythmia/AboutArrhythmia/Treatment-Guidelines-of-Atrial-Fibrillation-AFib-or-AF_UCM_423779_Article.jsp
the need for anticoagulation depends of your CHA2DS2–VASc risk.. after reading you will be entirely informed ,and you are able to discuss your treatment better with the doctors.

Jump to this post

I am also to be traveling extensively in Italy – but have put it off – I have persistent afib with no symptoms – and will gVe cardioversion in 1 month

@jmgm

Hello I am about to go on warfarin for a month and have cardioversion for afib

Has anyone had cardioversion?

Jump to this post

Yes, I have had three cardioversions, two were successful, one did not work. My sinus rhythm was restored with medications. I am researching ablations now, as my doctor has recommended that as a next step. I have been on warfarin for about 9 years.

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