Chronic pain - Let's talk

Posted by leh09 @leh09, Mar 23, 2016

Are there any discussions for chronic pain?

Liked by SpineAZ, bob815c

@suebreen54

Have you tried going to pain management. That’s were I go. That’s
probably why my epidurals don’t hurt. I love my Dr. I recommend seeing a
pain specialist in a pain clinic. Usually they are I’m totally drawing a
blank on what kind of Dr he is its on the tip of my tongue. Have ever
thought of going I saw a neurologists once he was rude and insulting and
didn’t make since to me. Do you need a new MRI? We have the right to not
live in pain. Although there will always be some pain. There are a lot
of organizations like the American Pain Association you can find on the
Internet it’s great. I recommend that too. What do you think. How long
have you been struggling with this?

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I lost my leg in Vietnam in 1968 from a big land mine. That is when my pain started almost 50 years ago. Of course I have picked up more pain problems since then and I have seen all kinds of doctors, pain clinics and various alternative methods of pain control since then. You are correct you have to keep trying to find the best pain control. There is a new attempt to stop the use of opioids except for cancer patients and temporary patients because of the increase in overdose deaths from opioids. I do not believe it will help and it will only make things worst for those of us who get some relief from opioids. In one journal on pain they had studies that showed a higher than normal suicide rate among chronic pain suffers. Personally I support the right of an individual to end their life if they have a bad illness or painful illness that can not be corrected or adequately controlled by pain medicine or other means. But I do believe you have to try all the things you reasonability can to help yourself resolve the pain before you resort to a final end. 19lin

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I agree with your post 99%. Especially on avoiding back surgery. I just
turned 40, and am 3 months post-op from my 13th spine surgery with over
half of those being fusions. Where I disagree is with the Spinal Cord
Stimulator. If the T.E.N.S. unit didnt work , neither will the SCS. The
SCS is essentially the same thing only constant. Then when you move a
certain direction or lye down you get a significant spike in the
“electro-shock” feeling. On top of that, your going to have another back
surgery where they will have to do a laminectomy, or discetomy around the
T7-9 area. Not a big deal, but still your going under the knife. Best
wishes and good luck on whichever you choose to do.

Sincerely,
Brandon

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@suebreen54

I live in the Adirondack mountains and I don’t have a community pool or physical therapy near I don’t drive. And my son and wife have four kids so it’s to much to go.
I think if you go to a pain clinic and sign their papers making an agreement to follow their rules. If your in sever chronic pain and you can’t function you will be given the appropriate pain relief narconic or not. Has anyone tried epidurals

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Hi there,
I’m in a somewhat similar situation RE: the fusions and epidurals/facet
injections. I would just like to caution you about the Spinal Cord
Stimulator. They DO NOT WORK (in my opinion, and I’m on my 2nd). Unless
you are comfortable being “shocked” similar to a T.E.N.S. Unit constantly,
24 hrs a day. And when you move a certain way or lye down you get an extra
“jolt”, which is always fun. Consider also that you will under go a
laminectomy or discetomy at the T7-9 area, which is a quick recovery, but
the point remains that you are still undergoing back surgery.
Good Luck and best wishes in your recovery, or search there of
Sincerely,
Brandon

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I agree regarding TEMS and spinal cord stimulator, early on the doctors told me if the TEMS does not work neither will the stimulator, but I have heard of those who feel the stimulator was helpful to them. I think much of pain control is an individual thing. There is a lot about the pain process and the brain that science does not know yet. 19lin

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Liked by bekie

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This is a wonderful discussion. So many pain sufferers need to know how pain affects people differently. Managing pain is more of an art form than science, but the two go hand in hand.

The four biggest areas of pain management I always look at for myself are:
1) Brain receptors
2) Targeted pain on areas of the body
3) Stress relief
4) Diet and exercise

I mean when it comes to the “science” of pain, we could simply take medications that disrupt pain receptors in the brain limiting neurons from firing, but in my experience (i.e. opiates, and the like) also have a negative affect on the quality of life, giving pain patients what is known as “brain fog”, loss of memory, sleep disorder and so on.

On the flip side, attacking the areas of pain alone is sometimes not enough. So I’m constantly asking people, what’s their “perfect” mix of the two. Being unbalanced with either one can label you as an opiate user, abuser of the system, but not taking the right combination can play a huge role in the quality of life that you have and your mental state as a hole.

Then there’s the debate about over-the-counter vs. prescribed medications. Which ones do you chose when your pain meds don’t work? Is it appropriate to go out and add Tylenol, Aspirin and Aleve to the mix? When is it acceptable behavior or not? What affect will it have on your system, especially your stomach and the increase of acids.

Now one of my favorites and often overlooked is more natural ways to conquer pain, specifically meditation. Since pain is all but managed through the brain, then in my opinion meditation is the method underutilized to “clean up” the junk in the mind that’s coming in. Or another way to put it, when you meditate, it’s like “cleaning up” your computers hard-drive so that the computer itself goes much faster afterwards.

Daily medication doesn’t mean sitting in some spiritual room with candles and scented incense. No, for your it could mean having some quiet time with tea in the morning reflecting on your day, outlining your goals for the day (as the pain allows, or as others would call “the # of spoons), and allowing your mind to filter out the stuff that increases your stress in order to tackle the pain coming in.

Stress I find goes hand in hand with pain as well. Finding “me time” is so important to decrease pain on a daily basis. Less stress = more active, better sleep, and easier to manage pain. Do whatever you need to relax your mind and body on a daily basis (I understand hard to do while in pain, but daily rituals will help eventually).

Most people are shocked when they hear that i’m in chronic pain. I rarely show it to people around me. Sometimes it’s hard not to show it, which can be exhausting depending on the level of pain you have and what’s affected.

Over the last 20 years, I’ve survived multiple blood clots throughout my body. I’ve had massive open wounds for 10 years straight, my legs are constantly wrapped with bandages and compression bandages. Rarely does anyone see me with shorts so I don’t have to explain to them what it is and what they’re for. But over time, I’ve found that by hiding my pain only increases my stress and doesn’t allow my brain to release it, talk about it, or be ok with asking for help.

I hope this peaks more discussions on “daily tips” or “rituals” that you do which helps to decrease pain. I think it’s obvious here that we all have experience with meds and our own pain management, but I’m really interested to hear what else I can try from your own experiences!! 🙂

Martin R. Lemieux

Liked by salena54, bekie

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@19lin

I agree regarding TEMS and spinal cord stimulator, early on the doctors told me if the TEMS does not work neither will the stimulator, but I have heard of those who feel the stimulator was helpful to them. I think much of pain control is an individual thing. There is a lot about the pain process and the brain that science does not know yet. 19lin

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I have used Tens units with no relief from chronic back pain. Finally
had a neurostimulator put in back (long incision plus battery
incision). I psyched myself up that this would work for my 8 and 9
pain since it was last resort. I have bad side effects to all meds, so
live with much pain for over 20 years. It did not work and even with
it shut off my body continued to vibrate. Another surgery to remove it
with more scars, over a year later. I have hardware in my back from 3
other surgeries. Told yesterday by 4th pain dr in over 20 years they
have nothing more they can do. Would like to try some marijuana
brownies but do not know where or how.

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@suebreen54

I live in the Adirondack mountains and I don’t have a community pool or physical therapy near I don’t drive. And my son and wife have four kids so it’s to much to go.
I think if you go to a pain clinic and sign their papers making an agreement to follow their rules. If your in sever chronic pain and you can’t function you will be given the appropriate pain relief narconic or not. Has anyone tried epidurals

Jump to this post

I, too, have had spinal fusions, epidurals, and neural stimulator of
which none work for my chronic back pain. Cannot take meds – have bad
reactions to all pain relievers. It seems some of us are stuck just
bearing the pain. My last pain management dr said nothing can be done
– just exercise – but I am mostly on the bed otherwise 8 to 9 pain.

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@19lin

I agree regarding TEMS and spinal cord stimulator, early on the doctors told me if the TEMS does not work neither will the stimulator, but I have heard of those who feel the stimulator was helpful to them. I think much of pain control is an individual thing. There is a lot about the pain process and the brain that science does not know yet. 19lin

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Have you gone to any pain clinics, and have you had any epidurals? The epidurals I have had from pain Drs who are mostly anesthesiologist and are painless. It’s outpatient you go right home. For me it’s part of my pain treatment. Also I really recommend the American Pain Association on the Internet. They have a lot of information and tools for you. It is another thing that helps.

Liked by bekie

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To suebreen 54 – I have gone to to pain dr/anesthesiologists for over 20
years. Epidural shots of many locations have not worked on me.

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@19lin

I agree regarding TEMS and spinal cord stimulator, early on the doctors told me if the TEMS does not work neither will the stimulator, but I have heard of those who feel the stimulator was helpful to them. I think much of pain control is an individual thing. There is a lot about the pain process and the brain that science does not know yet. 19lin

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I am sorry that nothing works for you, I also have tried these with no results. I can use medication but not all of it as morphine does not always agree with me although fentanyl patches do help me. Muscle relaxants help my sciatic type nerve pain which is due to problems with my back. You may also wish to try acupuncture, meditation and relaxation as well as massage and a chiropractor. If you check marijuana on the internet it will tell which states have made it legal for medical treatment. With marijuana they take certain parts out of the plant and use for pain so you do not have to smoke or eat it. If you live near a state where it is legal you might be able to visit there or have a friend or relative get some as long as it is not illegal where you live.

There are many other techniques you can use that might help your pain and all you can do is try them to see if they help. I do know of those who use TEMS and get relief even though it did not work for me. Many like acupuncture but make sure you see someone who is well trained the best will be member of a professional acupuncture association. Good luck I will pray you get some relief. 19lin

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@mlemieux

This is a wonderful discussion. So many pain sufferers need to know how pain affects people differently. Managing pain is more of an art form than science, but the two go hand in hand.

The four biggest areas of pain management I always look at for myself are:
1) Brain receptors
2) Targeted pain on areas of the body
3) Stress relief
4) Diet and exercise

I mean when it comes to the “science” of pain, we could simply take medications that disrupt pain receptors in the brain limiting neurons from firing, but in my experience (i.e. opiates, and the like) also have a negative affect on the quality of life, giving pain patients what is known as “brain fog”, loss of memory, sleep disorder and so on.

On the flip side, attacking the areas of pain alone is sometimes not enough. So I’m constantly asking people, what’s their “perfect” mix of the two. Being unbalanced with either one can label you as an opiate user, abuser of the system, but not taking the right combination can play a huge role in the quality of life that you have and your mental state as a hole.

Then there’s the debate about over-the-counter vs. prescribed medications. Which ones do you chose when your pain meds don’t work? Is it appropriate to go out and add Tylenol, Aspirin and Aleve to the mix? When is it acceptable behavior or not? What affect will it have on your system, especially your stomach and the increase of acids.

Now one of my favorites and often overlooked is more natural ways to conquer pain, specifically meditation. Since pain is all but managed through the brain, then in my opinion meditation is the method underutilized to “clean up” the junk in the mind that’s coming in. Or another way to put it, when you meditate, it’s like “cleaning up” your computers hard-drive so that the computer itself goes much faster afterwards.

Daily medication doesn’t mean sitting in some spiritual room with candles and scented incense. No, for your it could mean having some quiet time with tea in the morning reflecting on your day, outlining your goals for the day (as the pain allows, or as others would call “the # of spoons), and allowing your mind to filter out the stuff that increases your stress in order to tackle the pain coming in.

Stress I find goes hand in hand with pain as well. Finding “me time” is so important to decrease pain on a daily basis. Less stress = more active, better sleep, and easier to manage pain. Do whatever you need to relax your mind and body on a daily basis (I understand hard to do while in pain, but daily rituals will help eventually).

Most people are shocked when they hear that i’m in chronic pain. I rarely show it to people around me. Sometimes it’s hard not to show it, which can be exhausting depending on the level of pain you have and what’s affected.

Over the last 20 years, I’ve survived multiple blood clots throughout my body. I’ve had massive open wounds for 10 years straight, my legs are constantly wrapped with bandages and compression bandages. Rarely does anyone see me with shorts so I don’t have to explain to them what it is and what they’re for. But over time, I’ve found that by hiding my pain only increases my stress and doesn’t allow my brain to release it, talk about it, or be ok with asking for help.

I hope this peaks more discussions on “daily tips” or “rituals” that you do which helps to decrease pain. I think it’s obvious here that we all have experience with meds and our own pain management, but I’m really interested to hear what else I can try from your own experiences!! 🙂

Martin R. Lemieux

Jump to this post

It sounds like you have been through the mill, you might want to try acupuncture and even hypnosis as possible alternatives. There are a lot of options, but that only supports that no one really knows what causes pain and what to do about it. If there were one method that worked better than ever it would lead the pack, but there are none and with the current attack on opioids it makes it even worst.

I try not to show my pain, but when the sciatic pain hits I can not hide it. I just get away from others and take what I can until it passes, the best I have found so far is a muscle relaxant which I only found out about in the last couple years of the last 40+ years of pain. 19lin

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I think having this forum to talk to each other helps. If we go to a pain clinic and sign their paperwork follow the rules take as directed they arent going to take your medicine away. You have a right to pain relief. There are many people who are working for people in pain. Most people know nothing about chronic pain until it happens to them. Go to Amrican chronic pain association you will find that there are people to support you in findind pain relief. They have other sites to go to.

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@suebreen54

I think having this forum to talk to each other helps. If we go to a pain clinic and sign their paperwork follow the rules take as directed they arent going to take your medicine away. You have a right to pain relief. There are many people who are working for people in pain. Most people know nothing about chronic pain until it happens to them. Go to Amrican chronic pain association you will find that there are people to support you in findind pain relief. They have other sites to go to.

Jump to this post

You might think so, but the Veterans Administration medical centers have already started to restrict opioids to cancer patients only and the only others to get them would be for temporary pain. They will send you to a variety of alternate methods of pain control, but there is no proven method that works, even opioids do not work for everyone. A bill has been proposed in Congress now to make the VA system a law.

On another site like this I read of many people who had contracts with their doctors on pain medicine, but accidentally got thrown off them because of some minor problem such as going to the ER and receiving extra pain meds for some issue which then violated their contract. Some wrote that their doctor would not even discuss what happened with them. In some cases the clinics would bar opioids or insurance would no longer pay for the medication.

Hopefully you will not have this problem, but some are according to their post in the Web MD pain site.

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@19lin

I agree regarding TEMS and spinal cord stimulator, early on the doctors told me if the TEMS does not work neither will the stimulator, but I have heard of those who feel the stimulator was helpful to them. I think much of pain control is an individual thing. There is a lot about the pain process and the brain that science does not know yet. 19lin

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I have had lower back pain for years,  bone on bone, sciatica down the legs. 
After trying everything I had PRP plus amniotic stem cell injections,  plus laser treatments 3 times a week,  then twice a week, and now twice a month.   The injections were done in November and my back is getting  better every day.  It takes a few months for the stem cells to regenerate all the nerves and to build collagen so I am very hopeful I will be completely pain free.   The downside is insurance does not pay for it, and it is rather expensive,  but it beats surgery. I am back at the gym working out three times a week. 

Liked by bekie

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This is great news. I have often wondered if stem cells would help. My only knee I still has no longer has anything between the bones and I talked to the doctor about stem cells but he did not know if they would help of not. Sciatic nerve pain is the worst kind for me and I know it is due to my spine problems but I do not know what is in my back. The last two MRIs I had I insisted on getting out early as right along my spine it really burned or felt like burning all along the my spine.

Has anyone else ever experienced burning along their spine during an MRI? It happened to me twice and the doctors look at me like I’m crazy, but I know what I felt. 19lin

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