Chronic Pain members - Welcome, please introduce yourself

Posted by Kelsey Mohring @kelseydm, Apr 27, 2016

Welcome to the new Chronic Pain group.

I’m Kelsey and I’m the moderator of the group. I look forwarding to welcoming you and introducing you to other members. Feel free to browse the topics or start a new one.

Why not take a minute and introduce yourself.

@contentandwell

@artscaping Is bariatric oxygen therapy the same thing they use for burn victims? There is a hospital in a small town in Maine that we go through on our way to our “camp” that specializes in that. Who would ever think that a small town hospital would have that? I presume it is primarily in larger medical centers.
JK

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@artscaping and @contentandwell

Here is some information I found on Mayo’s website regarding hyperbaric-oxygen therapy. I thought you might find it interesting as well as informative – I certain did!
http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/hyperbaric-oxygen-therapy/basics/definition/prc-20019167
Teresa

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@contentandwell

@artscaping Is bariatric oxygen therapy the same thing they use for burn victims? There is a hospital in a small town in Maine that we go through on our way to our “camp” that specializes in that. Who would ever think that a small town hospital would have that? I presume it is primarily in larger medical centers.
JK

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@hopeful33250 Thanks Teresa, that is really interesting. I never knew how many conditions it was used for.
JK

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@contentandwell

@artscaping Is bariatric oxygen therapy the same thing they use for burn victims? There is a hospital in a small town in Maine that we go through on our way to our “camp” that specializes in that. Who would ever think that a small town hospital would have that? I presume it is primarily in larger medical centers.
JK

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@contentandwell Me neither – it said that is used for skin grafts so I guess you were right about it being used for victims of burns. Something new everyday! Teresa

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Is hyperbaric oxygen therapy ever used for Burning mouth syndrome or Trigeminal neuralgia? Thank you so much!!

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@lauren123 You can take a look at the Mayo website, http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/hyperbaric-oxygen-therapy/basics/definition/prc-20019167 under “Why It’s Done”. It doesn’t list Burning mouth syndrome or Trigeminal neuralgia but you could talk with your doctor to get his/her opinion. Teresa

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I am marylou8 and have a lot of autoimmune issues which have left me with chronic pain.

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@hopeful33250

@lauren123 You can take a look at the Mayo website, http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/hyperbaric-oxygen-therapy/basics/definition/prc-20019167 under “Why It’s Done”. It doesn’t list Burning mouth syndrome or Trigeminal neuralgia but you could talk with your doctor to get his/her opinion. Teresa

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Thanks, Teresa. I did check the link and saw that these conditions were not mentioned. I’ll check it out with my Pain Management doctor.

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I am Ed Pugh. Have had two surgeries at Mayo but continue to have chronic pain. Further treatment is being explored. Have an appointment in 2 weeks. Also have had a c4- c5 corpectomy and have neck pain and difficulty sleeping. Would like to continue my meditation but my breathing is now interupted with extreme burping to let off pressure, so it’s difficult. Situation is compounded by inability to lay down without exacerbating pain and cannot get comfortable in a chair or recliner.

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Hi, I am Marield65 and if you stick with reading all these messages you will get the help or inspiration from the members. Just stick to it and don’t ever give up.

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Thank you.

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Anyone know a good Dr. specialist in back surgery and is in Boston? Marield65

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@marield65 Hi Marie. I have a friend who has seen a couple of back surgeons, I will ask her what her prognosis and which she is going with. I forget which hospital the original one is at, I think possibly New England Baptist, but the one she was considering more strongly I believe is at Mass General. With her there is a question of whether surgery is the correct course of action so of course she wants to make absolutely sure to choose the right one. The first one was all about surgery.
JK

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I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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Hello Hazel (@hazelblumberg) – Welcome to Mayo Connect. We are glad you found us…this is a great place to share your story, ask questions and learn what others are doing for similar health issues. I’m tagging others who have talked about TMJ to see if they may have some treatment options for you.

@lauren123 @gailb @Gray @pammyl66 can you provide any information to Hazel?

Hazel – there is an active TMJ discussion on Connect here that you might want to join and ask your questions there:
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/i-clench-my-teeth-at-night-which-has-resulted-in-severe-tmj/bookmark/?ajax_hook=action&_wpnonce=41b5ffa93f
John

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@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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John, I can’t thank you enough for mentioning my situation to others! I will definitely log into the TMJ pain discussion you mentioned. Thanks again!

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