Chronic Pain members - Welcome, please introduce yourself

Posted by Kelsey Mohring @kelseydm, Apr 27, 2016

Welcome to the new Chronic Pain group.

I’m Kelsey and I’m the moderator of the group. I look forwarding to welcoming you and introducing you to other members. Feel free to browse the topics or start a new one.

Why not take a minute and introduce yourself.

@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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Hazel, I don’t have TMJ but I have chronic pain due to degenerating disc’s in my neck. I just stop taking all pain medication which was probably not smart since now they think I need surgery. But that’s the cards I’ve been dealt. I do have a tens machine, it is my best friend. It helps your muscles to relax and somehow tricks your brain – not feeling the pain. It’s not permanent but it does give you some temporary relief. I’ve never thought about putting it up on my head though mine is neck and back. If you look on Amazon, have a lot to choose from and they’re not very expensive now. Good luck Jennifer

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@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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Jenapower, thank you so much for writing! I’m so sorry about the degenerative disc problems. I’m sorry for anyone in pain. I’m taking tylenol + codeine, but I haven’t had to take any today–yet, anyway. I tried to find online articles about pros and cons of TENS machines, but I kept discovering that the glowing reports came from dental practices that use them. So, of course they’re going to say TENS machines are the greatest. If I ignore those articles, there isn’t a whole lot left, and what I read seems to say “yes, but. . . .” Anyway, I’m definitely going to look at TENS machines. Even temporary relief would be great! I never know when and why the TMJ pain is going to strike. It’s driving me slowly crazy.

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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Hazel, I’m curious, you said you had gone to physical therapy I think, that’s the first place I ever had anyone use a tens machine on me. I learned where they placed the pads, and the intensity that helped. Mine are pretty severe muscle spasm’s and I can put it across an area of spasm and gradually turn it up higher and higher. It feels a little weird at first but then I look forward to it because I know it will help. It’s definitely an electrical shock type of feeling but it’s very mild. I’m not sure where you would place little electrode patches to get the TMJ muscle between your jaw. If you do go to PT, ask them to try it. Or ask your doctor were you would place the pads. I do feel like it helps me a lot and have been very glad I have it. It’s just kind learning the way that it works for you.

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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Hi, Jena. Thanks for writing! Yes, I went to a physical therapist whom my dentist recommended. The phys therapist was, to put it mildly, WEIRD. He didn’t listen to me at all. He just talked at me. He had some “interesting” theories about using magnets and said he could treat me with magnets at his other clinic, for $150 a pop, which my insurance wouldn’t cover. He also tried to force me to go to a naturopath friend of his.

Whenever I reported my symptoms to him, he kept telling me that I _couldn’t_ have experienced them. He insisted that I must’ve had a traumatic head injury, which I told him I’d never had. But he refused to believe me. He did a bunch of exercises on me that I was supposed to repeat at home. When the excruciating pain of the session finally wore off, I tried some of the exercises–letting my jaw just fall open and hang down; lightly slapping my jaw with the backs of my hands–but they hurt like crazy. He used something like a buzzer on me but wouldn’t let me see it; he kept it concealed in his hand. Maybe that was a TENS unit, but I don’t know. He never mentioned a TENS unit to me, and he never placed any TENS pads on my face. I left PT thinking this guy was a complete nutcase. He scheduled me for four more appointments, an hour long each, but I’m canceling all of them. I’ve had PT before, for other things, and yes, it hurt, but things got better. This guy’s brand of PT rocketed my pain level up into the stratosphere. I’m never going back to him again.

I’ve been reading stuff on TENS units and TMJ pain. There are some really inexpensive units out there. I may buy one–I saw some for around $30–and try it out. I don’t think I have much to lose, since nothing else has worked so far. And your report makes me feel that a TENS unit may really help.

I’m also going to research acupuncture and TMJ pain. Almost 20 years ago, I got severe Bell’s palsy, which paralyzed 3/4 of my face. The only thing that cleared it up was acupuncture. So, anyway, more things to explore.

Thanks again for telling me about your experiences with the TENS unit. It really sounds very promising.

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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@hazelblumberg. Wow. What you experienced was just too bizzare! Slap your jaws? Magnets? Buzzers? Insisting you must have had a brain injury?! He sounds like a kook! You are right to never go back to him! So sorry you had that experience. How awful! I pray you find some good, sensible ideas to help you on Mayo Connect. I find it to be a great source of information and support. I use what works for me and discard the rest. Not everyone responds the same to different treatments. For pain, I have decided to look into medical marijuana. I refuse to use pain pills and over the counter stuff can mess up one’s stomach! Thanks for sharing. Hope you find relief soon.

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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Medical Marijuana offers much that can help. It is wise to have a “guide” and to take things slowly. The options are increasing rapidly. And experiencing pain free moments is so worth it.

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Blindeyepug, yup, that physical therapist was, um, interesting, to put it kindly and mildly. Makes me wonder about my dentist, whom I’ve gone to for about 25 years, who wrote me a referral to this nutcase.

My state (FL) now allows medical marijuana: hallelujah! However, there are a lot of hoops that healthcare providers have to jump through before they’re “qualified” to dispense it. They have to get “special training,” which, I think, entails coursework. FL seems to be trying to do everything it can to discourage use of medical marijuana. Of course, I’m sure that, if the legislators or their families and friends need it for pain, to counteract the nauseating effects of chemotherapy, etc., they’re able to get it quite easily. What hypocrisy! But I definitely want to try it for my TMJ pain.

I’m looking into acupuncture. I’d rather have an MD/acupuncturist or an NP/acupuncturist or an RN/acupuncturist than just an acupuncturist. I went to an MD/acupuncturist when I had severe Bell’s palsy, and that was the ONLY thing that relieved the facial paralysis. It’s a pity that this doc has since retired. Anyone have any experience with acupuncture for TMJ pain? And I’m seriously considering buying a TENS unit, as other folks here seem to find them helpful.

So far, I’m really impressed by the kindness, helpfulness, and suggestions of the folks on Mayo Connect. I’m so glad I found you folks!

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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Ya think? Good decision-stay away from the Quack insurance grabbing theives…………..let your brain and body tell
you what you need.

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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Chris, it would be SO wonderful to be free of pain! I really do want to try medical marijuana. When my primary care is back from her vacation, I want to talk to her about it. I don’t know if she’s jumped through all the hoops to prescribe it. Maybe the doc with whom she’s affiliated has. I really hope so. My innards are already so unhappy because of all the ibuprofen I’ve been downing since September, when the TMJ pain started!

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@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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Absolutely love your reply, Janneg! I think I only owe this mondo bizarro guy an $11 copay, and then my insurance (actually, my husband’s insurance; I’m self-employed and don’t have my own healthcare insurance) picks up the rest. Two solid days of agony following the agony of the PT itself is just way too much for me. Where I live, we don’t always have the absolute best healthcare providers, as no one really wants to live here. 🙂 I’m lucky to have a wonderful primary care (she’s a DNP) and an equally wonderful psychiatrist (for my clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder). I can only hope they don’t retire any time soon!

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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@hazelblumberg

I’m very sorry to hear that you have so much pain. Chronic pain surely affects our mental health. I know that it exacerbates my depression and anxiety and PTSD. I hope you find relief soon.

Jim

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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Thanks for your kind note, Jim. I appreciate it. I do have clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder, which are pretty much under control through meds prescribed by my very wonderful psychiatrist. But I’m definitely becoming very short-tempered and crabby and lacking in patience as a result of chronic TMJ pain. Just ask my husband! I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6 month med check on Monday, and I’m going to talk to him about TMJ pain solutions. I’m sure that my TMJ pain has been brought on by stress. I’ve tried meditation and yoga and deep diaphragmatic breathing and and and, but nothing seems to help. Arrghhhhh.

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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I had pretty intense tmj pain around 30 years ago, and I was prescribed amitriptyline. It really helped me. But the thing that helped even more was leaving the job I had at the time. End of stress, end of tmj!

I took Ibuprofen, 800mg 4 times a day for 20 years, and ended up with peptic ulcers. Now they won’t let me take any NSAIDS, though I do sometimes.

Jim

REPLY
@hazelblumberg

I developed earaches in September 2016. My primary care found no ear or sinus infection and sent me to an ENT, who diagnosed TMJ pain. I went to my dentist for help. He gave me weekly anesthesia shots into trigger points (OUCH!) and exercises to do, including massaging the trigger points and opening my mouth as wide as I could numerous times in the shower while my face was warm and wet. (I have been wearing a night guard made by my dentist for over 20 years; he replaces them as they wear out.) The pain continued and only got worse; it was at the top of my head, in my ears, in my jaw, above my palate (as though I’d eaten hot food). My dentist sent me to an oral surgeon, who did 360-degree x-rays and found no joint damage. He told me I was therefore not a candidate for surgery (YAY!) and prescribed Flexeril, a muscle relaxer. The pain only got worse, and I continued to wake up in the night with horrific pain. Ibuprofen didn’t even touch it.

My dentist then sent me to a physical therapist, who didn’t listen to a word I said. I came in on a “good” pain day: my pain level was about a 5 out of 10 (10 being the worst). After his examination and showing me how to do various exercises, he triumphantly told me that my pain level was now reduced. I said “No. My pain level is now about 7.5.” He said he didn’t believe me. He attempted to push me to go to his outside clinic to get “magnet therapy,” and he tried to push me to see a friend of his who is a naturopath. Two days after this session, I was still in excruciating pain and doubt I’d ever return to this physical therapist, although he had me schedule 4 more 1-hour sessions with him.

I called my dentist again, and he called in a prescription for Tylenol plus codeine, which I can take every 4 to 6 hours. My dentist seems to have no further solutions for me.

My primary care is currently out of town, but I will see her when she gets back (in August); she may be referring me to a pain management specialist, which my dentist recommended–however, my dentist refuses to give me a referral to such a specialist, even though the specialist will take referrals from dentists or doctors.

I have been treated for many years for clinical depression and panic/anxiety disorder by my psychiatrist, and the meds have helped me immensely. On Monday I see my psychiatrist for my usual 6-month med check, and I’m going to ask him for help with the terrible TMJ pain. I have also had fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome for a long time. The fibro pain has greatly lessened over time and hardly bothers me, but the CFS continues.

The TMJ pain makes it difficult to concentrate. I’m self-employed, and I enjoy my work. But pain gets in the way, as it does in every single situation: work or pastimes. My dentist mentioned massage therapy, but I’m in too much pain right now to try it. Another friend mentioned using a TENS unit. I feel as though I’m not living; to be in constant pain is hardly living, at least to me.

Any other suggestions? Would a TENS unit help? I’m more than willing to purchase one. I’ll try just about anything to be pain free. Sometimes I am pain free. But I spend about 2 weeks out of every month in serious pain. I am feeling very discouraged.

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Hazel, that PT story scares me. I’ve had the same PT for probable 7 yrs now and he’d never act like that. My whole problem started with a badly broken humerus, but the bones were lined up. My then Dr had me start at ‘his’ PT to early, it refractured the new bone that was mending the break. It never regrew again and went on to a nonunion break (2 pieces), yuck. My arm/shoulder had 5 surgeries to get my shoulder together all thanks to a bad PT. When I had my first surgery my surgeon insisted I go to the guy I still see. He’s amazing and you can totally tell the difference. It sounds like you have great judgement, if you need PT find someone new. So sorry you had such a bad experience, I can relate! Jennifer

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Hello all!! I just started following…chronic pain is not for whiner’s nor wimp’s. Hoping to learn some things.

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