Long-term depression

Posted by seeker70 @seeker70, Oct 11, 2017

I have been depressed, when I think about it, since I was a kid (I”m a senior now!) I have been treated off and on with meds and minimal talk therapy, but nothing changes. In the past it has been underlying but as I grow older it is becoming more intense. People ask: ‘why are you depressed? I never get depressed, just get a better attitude’. Or they don’t hear my (probably passive-aggressive) cries for help. Or they say: ‘what do you have to be depressed about?’ Actually although I agree with these opinions to a certain extent, it does not address the problem that depression is not a ‘why’, not is it a ‘choice’. It’s almost like being gay, you just are. Maybe I should just accept it (guess that’s what I have done for decades 🙂 But I don’t want to. I want to feel better now. Earlier in my life I was able to enjoy things, although the depression would keep popping out. But now I seem to have trouble enjoying anything, including my own family, and it’s harder and harder to ‘push depression down’ once it’s popped. So I have longer periods of depression and sadness and sleeplessness and lonliness, an shorter periods of being able to enjoy my life. Or want something. Or look forward to anything. I will say too that I have as much to be happy about as I do to be unhappy – but as I said, it’s not a ‘why’. I’m looking for people to explore this idea, and to help each other begin to overcome. Or maybe it’s just me and there’s no one else who feels this way — 😉 Thank you for reading all this.

mamacita- I was also a teacher, but we aren't children here. We have had a lot of experience as you can tell by the writings on these posts. Adding medicine when it will help is not introducing a new thing. And learning lessons, one at a time is fine, but after you are better and can think clearly. You sound like a very religious person and I am not. I believe in science all the way.

REPLY
@kdo0827

I’m really struggling these past 3 days. I’m being weaned off of Trazadone-cold turkey, tapering off Lexapro and Remeron and then they started me on Cymbalta. I also take Methadone. This is all being done to help me as I finally found a dr who realized I’ve been on a tremendous cocktail of meds. I’m having every withdrawal symptom possible. He called to check on me (on a Saturday) and said I may be experiencing seratonin syndrome and to quit the Lexapro immediately and to give it a few more days. Has anyone else been thru this? It’s unreal. Please pray for me.

Jump to this post

Thank you. I really wonder sometimes if doctors stop and think about what all our bodies will go through when they make these decisions. In my case stopping Trazadone cold turkey, weaning off Lexapro and Remeron all at the same time. On top of this to add a new drug Cymbalta. My body the past 4 days has been through so much. I feel like I have the flu, and have all sorts of other stuff going on. My husband has pretty much kept an eye on me the whole time. It’s so scary! I think to go through something like this you should be hospitalized. The dr says I have Seratonin Syndrome. Whatever it is I just want my life back! The goal here is to be off less meds and I’m trying to remind myself that it will get better. So hard to do.

REPLY
@kdo0827

I’m really struggling these past 3 days. I’m being weaned off of Trazadone-cold turkey, tapering off Lexapro and Remeron and then they started me on Cymbalta. I also take Methadone. This is all being done to help me as I finally found a dr who realized I’ve been on a tremendous cocktail of meds. I’m having every withdrawal symptom possible. He called to check on me (on a Saturday) and said I may be experiencing seratonin syndrome and to quit the Lexapro immediately and to give it a few more days. Has anyone else been thru this? It’s unreal. Please pray for me.

Jump to this post

Mayo Clinic has a very good explanation of Seratonin Syndrome at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/serotonin-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20354758

REPLY
@kdo0827

I’ve tried everything! The only calming thing is a fan which I have and a cool washcloth around my neck. Running a fever which is par for the course. I really appreciate your kindness.

Jump to this post

@kdo0827

I'm a Volunteer Mentor with Mayo Connect, and I'm concerned that you have a fever with your changes in medications. One of the symptoms of severe serotonin syndrome is having a high fever. If you are still having symptoms, please go to the Emergency Room! This can be a big problem, so don't hesitate to seek help immediately!

Please let me know how you're doing today. I hope your symptoms have lessened.

No, most doctors don't know what you will go through because they've never experienced what you are/will during withdrawal or starting new medication. Not that they don't care, they just don't know. I rely on my pharmacist a lot to let me know what may happen and when it's an emergency to get help.

Thanks, Gail
Volunteer Mentor

REPLY
@kdo0827

I’ve tried everything! The only calming thing is a fan which I have and a cool washcloth around my neck. Running a fever which is par for the course. I really appreciate your kindness.

Jump to this post

Thanks for your concern. Because it makes you feel like you have the flu is so weird to me. I got a sore throat the first day followed by congestion, headache and fever. My throat is much better and my fever is hovering around 99-100. I mentioned this to my dr yesterday. Do you know why you get these symptoms? So odd to get flu symptoms from an anti depressant.

REPLY
@kdo0827

I’ve tried everything! The only calming thing is a fan which I have and a cool washcloth around my neck. Running a fever which is par for the course. I really appreciate your kindness.

Jump to this post

@kdo0827

I'm glad your fever is low today. I'm not a medical professional, so I don't know why your symptoms are those of having the flu. My guess is that your immune system has kicked in and is trying to make sure the "foreign" things in your body go away. Also, I think we all react differently to these situations. If you start feeling worse, please go to the ER and tell them what you're doing and that your doctor said you have serotonin syndrome.

Good luck with your withdrawal!

Gail
Volunteer Mentor

REPLY

@peach414144

We could be great friends! Your love for chocolate equals mine. Teresa

REPLY

have a look and measure and get your adrenal gland assessed and also the adrenal gland epinephrine which floods the hyper campus amygdala and increases the levels of anxieties and depression and also under great stress we release a lot of cortisol .suggested idea is to find foods to increase serotonin levels and also melatonin and vit b and magnesium .and of course chocolate

REPLY
@sirgalahad

have a look and measure and get your adrenal gland assessed and also the adrenal gland epinephrine which floods the hyper campus amygdala and increases the levels of anxieties and depression and also under great stress we release a lot of cortisol .suggested idea is to find foods to increase serotonin levels and also melatonin and vit b and magnesium .and of course chocolate

Jump to this post

@sirgalahad , I do take magnesium every day. Chocolate is an occasional treat. I will see about those tests you mentioned. Thanks for the information. Glad to "talk" with you!

REPLY

Good morning! I, too, am in your boat! I don't know that I have a solution for you, but we can certainly hold hands through this. I will go ahead and say that being a senior adds to the distress for many reasons….regret over failures that we have no time to reverse; sorrow over so many loved ones we have lost and cannot be replaced; thoughts about how to be prepared/proactive for the future, particularly as we sense less ability to physically address things such as taking care of our homes/yards, meeting difficult obligations, etc.; possibly living further away from children/old friends; receiving less and less respect from co-workers who do not see us as part of the "up-and-coming" team; and it seems like the list gets longer every day. Some of these things are dealt with well enough to send them away for the time being, but as you said, the issues never completely go away. The good thing about senior issues is that we have the ability to tell ourselves we have earned the right to go a little easier on ourselves, and simply expect that others should understand. And they should. We must disallow too many expectations of ourselves, and come up with compromises that work. We must leave the past in the past. It is what it is, and will never change. Those of us who are Christians can rely upon Christ to assist us with our direction/goals. And don't give up reasonable goals! Keep working toward something, e.g. assisting with fundraising for reputable/excellent causes in your community and worldwide; sharing skills that come easy to you, e.g. taking over some of the paperwork at your church or another organization, like newsletters, banking, communication, etc. I know this only touches the surface of our issue, but it is a start. It takes our minds off the pain, as we have less time to just sit and think, and it is worthwhile. It may not be the same "worthwhile" goals we had years ago, before we had so many distractions/burdens with which to deal, but we are forever becoming "new" people and should have new purpose. I don't know your entire situation, but I believe I understand your feelings. Thank you for reaching out to those of us who experience some of the same things, so that as a group, we can find solutions and companionship. May God bless you always!

REPLY

@seeker70 I can relate. How are you doing? I am 77 & have also dealt with anxiety/panic attacks with depression all of my adult life. Through recent therapy I discovered that I have experienced this unknowing since around age 10..12.

REPLY
@dianajane

@seeker70 I can relate. How are you doing? I am 77 & have also dealt with anxiety/panic attacks with depression all of my adult life. Through recent therapy I discovered that I have experienced this unknowing since around age 10..12.

Jump to this post

I am 72. I have had periods of anxiety and depression my whole adult life. Right now I am going through a horrible time with mainly Anxiety/panic causing depression.. I am scared that I am going to have this Anxiety/panic for the rest of my life. Iam on medication for a irregular heartbeat (propranolol, seroquel, mirtazapine, buspar and Ativan when needed I feel so drugged up. I am so afraid of serotonin syndrome because of the Mirtazapine and Buspar taken together. I am afraid my doctor is going to add another drug and that it will cause a bad reaction. This time around with the Anxiety/panic, I have been dealing with this for almost 2 years. I am exhausted and scared.

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.
  Request Appointment