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mikkeleo
@mikkeleo

Posts: 3
Joined: Apr 07, 2016

Mitral Valve & Tricuspid valve regurgitation: when to see a cardiologist?

Posted by @mikkeleo, Apr 6, 2016

I was just diagnosised with Mitral Valve and tricuspid insufficiency. I have had symptoms of fatigue, heart flutters, lightheadness, and one time passed out. Some discomfort in my left chest side area, sharp. Not all the time. My Dr. Told me this is common and we will recheck in 5 yrs. Im nervous to wait that long. What should i do? I cant stop thinking about this.

Thank you.
Sincerely,
Mikkeleo

REPLY

By the way i just turned 43 yrs. Old and female. Never had heart issues before until i went to the dr. For a check up she heard a loud murmur had an echo cardiogram done and was Dx with mitral and tricuspid valave. Im relative healthy, i was exercising regularly until this past fall and winter, ive been feeling more fatigued, i thought it was the winter blues and work schedule. When i tried to exercise, i tire out. Help.
Thank you.

If you are feeling discomfort and passed out from a heart issue, I would not be too satisfied with a come back in 5 years answer. I would seek a second opinion from a doctor who will actually listen to you and address your concerns. At a minimum, it would seem to me that you should be seen and have an echo every year.

Welcome to Connect @mikkeleo. I agree with @cynaburst. Five years is a long time. You know your body best. If the fatigue is affecting your ability to exercise, then I’d want to know how much and what type of exercise is good for you with this diagnosis.

Here’s some info from Mayo Clinic on tricuspid valve regurgitation http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/tricuspid-valve-regurgitation/home/ovc-20120489 It includes tips on self-management as well as video with Dr. Dearani, one of the best (and nicest) cardiovascular surgeons in the country and beyond.

Have you started being active again?

Liked by Ali Skahan

If you’re noticing symptoms worsening, I agree with @cynaburst and @colleen_young on seeking a second opinion.

Here are some resources that explain how to go about that, since it might be a new experience and it’s common to have hesitations doing so:

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/More/ConsumerHealthCare/Getting-a-Second-Medical-Opinion_UCM_434325_Article.jsp#.Vwus_j-hK70

@caretothepeople

If you’re noticing symptoms worsening, I agree with @cynaburst and @colleen_young on seeking a second opinion.

Here are some resources that explain how to go about that, since it might be a new experience and it’s common to have hesitations doing so:

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/More/ConsumerHealthCare/Getting-a-Second-Medical-Opinion_UCM_434325_Article.jsp#.Vwus_j-hK70

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Thank you all very much. I was so shocked to hear this Dx. Never thought i would have a heart issue, ive always been an active hiker, runner and biker. However, this past 2 years ive noticed my energy level just wasnt the same. I blamed it on moving from sunny AZ where i lived for the past 16 yrs , back to cold and dreary Iowa to be near family.
I will call my primary and have them suggest a cardiologist for a 2nd opinion.

My echocardigram results were good, but there was one issue that I questioned, if I should see a cardiologist for future testing. The exact statement from the reporti is: “Valvular structures reveals a trace to mild tricuspid regurgitation”. Even though the report is good that statement set a red flag for me. Should I see a cardiologist at this time or am I overreacting? I have symptoms pertaining to this condition but my thyroid test results indicated hyperthyroidism, which also give the same symptoms.

Welcome to Connect, @grandma47.
I moved your message to this discussion thread so you could meet other members talking about tricuspid valve regurgitation. It sounds like you have questions that would be best answered by a specialist, especially if you have symptoms. In the article from Mayo Clinic, they advise to see your doctor when “you have signs or symptoms of heart failure — such as feeling easily fatigued or short of breath, even with normal activity…”
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/tricuspid-valve-regurgitation/symptoms-causes/dxc-20120490

I’m also bringing @skooter27 @topaz @vdouglas and @cyndiblaw into the discussion as they may have additional thoughts. @mikkeleo how are you doing? Did you see a cardiologist or get a second opinion?

@colleenyoung

Welcome to Connect, @grandma47.
I moved your message to this discussion thread so you could meet other members talking about tricuspid valve regurgitation. It sounds like you have questions that would be best answered by a specialist, especially if you have symptoms. In the article from Mayo Clinic, they advise to see your doctor when “you have signs or symptoms of heart failure — such as feeling easily fatigued or short of breath, even with normal activity…”
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/tricuspid-valve-regurgitation/symptoms-causes/dxc-20120490

I’m also bringing @skooter27 @topaz @vdouglas and @cyndiblaw into the discussion as they may have additional thoughts. @mikkeleo how are you doing? Did you see a cardiologist or get a second opinion?

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Thank you for such a quick response. It was most appreciated.
Unfortunately my primary doctor has not gotten back to me, on this matter
and my abnormal TSH and T4 free test; this ha made me uneasy. I took it
upon myself and saw an endocrinologist yesterday, and made adjustments to
my medication and took more blood work to check adrenaline functioning.
I’m wondering if I should take the bull by it horns and see a
cardiologist. I am looking forward to reading others of their experience
with the same issue.
Thanks again,

Have a great day!
Grandma47

@colleenyoung

Welcome to Connect, @grandma47.
I moved your message to this discussion thread so you could meet other members talking about tricuspid valve regurgitation. It sounds like you have questions that would be best answered by a specialist, especially if you have symptoms. In the article from Mayo Clinic, they advise to see your doctor when “you have signs or symptoms of heart failure — such as feeling easily fatigued or short of breath, even with normal activity…”
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/tricuspid-valve-regurgitation/symptoms-causes/dxc-20120490

I’m also bringing @skooter27 @topaz @vdouglas and @cyndiblaw into the discussion as they may have additional thoughts. @mikkeleo how are you doing? Did you see a cardiologist or get a second opinion?

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Hi @grandma47

The high anxiety of heart related issues can, in my opinion, be the most difficult aspect of dealing with this type of illness. I can understand your concern and I'm sorry you have to deal with this. You are definitely not alone Dealing with these symptoms.
Generally the most important part of a physician presenting a diagnosis is to reassure the patient and address any concerns they may have.
I have also experienced your symptoms. They are extremely frightening. My diagnosis is different than yours. I experience premature ventricular contractions (PVC's), Tachycardia (controlled with beta blockers), takes my breath away, makes me start to faint. Feels like the panic and shock of falling off a cliff. I have dealt with this so long that when it happens now I hold my breath and bear down until normal rhythm resumes. I have convinced myself that it will not take my life. Beta blockers and low dose anxiety medication have allowed me to feel much better. I am not saying this will work for your diagnosis but there is always hope.
Make an appointment with your doctor and let him know that you are having trouble convincing yourself that it is safe to wait 5 years. Let your doctor know that you are suffering tremendous anxiety because of your symptoms.

What tests have you had if you don't mind me asking. Are you taking Meds?

Hang in there, you will be fine!

Thank you for your supported comments. I appreciate you sharing of the anxiety that comes when you hear of this health issue even if at this time is not a serious problem. I see my internist this Thurs to discuss this matter. If he does not think I need a cardiologist at this time I’m going to tell him, i will feel more secure of being under a cardiologist care now to prevent an unfortunate future event with my heart failing me. I’m almost 70 andi believe in prevented healthcare. Again, thank you for your advice and support. It was most appreciate. Take care and God bless!

@colleenyoung

Welcome to Connect @mikkeleo. I agree with @cynaburst. Five years is a long time. You know your body best. If the fatigue is affecting your ability to exercise, then I’d want to know how much and what type of exercise is good for you with this diagnosis.

Here’s some info from Mayo Clinic on tricuspid valve regurgitation http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/tricuspid-valve-regurgitation/home/ovc-20120489 It includes tips on self-management as well as video with Dr. Dearani, one of the best (and nicest) cardiovascular surgeons in the country and beyond.

Have you started being active again?

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Hello. I am a new member here. I have a question with regards to this topic. Can multiple or frequent PVCs (Premature Ventricular Complex) be a definite cause for a diagnosis of Tricuspid Valve Regurgitation?

I know of a person who has been experiencing fatigue and weakness with shortness of breath and a feeling of heaviness on the chest. The person (47 yr. old female) had recently taken an EKG and was found to have multiple PVCs. A 2D Echo was also done and one of the results was having “Trivial Tricuspid Regurgitation”, with the rest of the findings being normal.

So my question is, are they or can they be related? I know arrhythmia is with the electrical conduction and the regurgitation, I would think is more on the physiology of the part (valve).

I am very much interested because I am a recent BSN graduate with EKG Monitoring studies..and reviewing for my NCLEX exam.
Your reply will be very much appreciated.

Thank you.

@colleenyoung

Welcome to Connect @mikkeleo. I agree with @cynaburst. Five years is a long time. You know your body best. If the fatigue is affecting your ability to exercise, then I’d want to know how much and what type of exercise is good for you with this diagnosis.

Here’s some info from Mayo Clinic on tricuspid valve regurgitation http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/tricuspid-valve-regurgitation/home/ovc-20120489 It includes tips on self-management as well as video with Dr. Dearani, one of the best (and nicest) cardiovascular surgeons in the country and beyond.

Have you started being active again?

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Hello @pambulan Welcome!I saw your question and didn’t want you to go without a connection to someone. I am not a Dr., I do have Mitral Valve Prolapse with PVC’s (premature ventricular contractions) and runs of Tachycardia. When you said your friend had multiple PVC’s, could that mean Multifocal PVC’s? They are really nasty, put me in the ER a couple of times. They can certainly cause symptoms and so can multiple runs of PVC’s. To answer your question if PVC’s and Valve regurgitation are related I would say definitely. The particular valve, the cause and the severity would be important I would think. Sorry I can’t help with your exam but I hope you do well and I hope your friend is doing well also.vdouglas

@colleenyoung

Welcome to Connect @mikkeleo. I agree with @cynaburst. Five years is a long time. You know your body best. If the fatigue is affecting your ability to exercise, then I’d want to know how much and what type of exercise is good for you with this diagnosis.

Here’s some info from Mayo Clinic on tricuspid valve regurgitation http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/tricuspid-valve-regurgitation/home/ovc-20120489 It includes tips on self-management as well as video with Dr. Dearani, one of the best (and nicest) cardiovascular surgeons in the country and beyond.

Have you started being active again?

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Welcome back Vdouglas. Glad you jumped in here.

I had rheumatic fever when I was 12 years old. I am now 72. The pediatrician who treated me for the rheumatic fever said I had a heart murmur. Since then some doctors have said they have heard a murmur. Most have not heard anything. Because of the rheumatic fever and the doctors hearing a murmur, I have had two echocardiograms over the last 20 years. Both times I have been told I had mild mitral valve regurgitation. There were no recommendations of follow-up. I have had not other signs of heart problems. The last echo cardiogram one was probably 10 years ago. Is this something that should be followed up on regularly as I age? If so, how often. I also have Type II diabetes.

@jannyw

I had rheumatic fever when I was 12 years old. I am now 72. The pediatrician who treated me for the rheumatic fever said I had a heart murmur. Since then some doctors have said they have heard a murmur. Most have not heard anything. Because of the rheumatic fever and the doctors hearing a murmur, I have had two echocardiograms over the last 20 years. Both times I have been told I had mild mitral valve regurgitation. There were no recommendations of follow-up. I have had not other signs of heart problems. The last echo cardiogram one was probably 10 years ago. Is this something that should be followed up on regularly as I age? If so, how often. I also have Type II diabetes.

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Welcome @jannyw. How often to have a follow-up to monitor a mild mitral valve regurgitation is a good question to ask your doctor. Every case is different, and your age and other conditions will also play a factor in determining the frequency. Do you go for a general annual or bi-annual check-up?

@vdouglas @grandma47 @cynaburst @mikkeleo can you share with Janny how often you go for follow-up appointments to monitor your heart condition?

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