Vaccine Recommendation after severe Covid and monocolonal treatment?

Posted by nichirschfield @nichirschfield, Jan 13, 2022

My husband had severe Covid (non-vaccinated)at the end of October. Got monocolonal treatment in the hospital on Day 10, ended up on a ventilator for 2 weeks. We were advised not to get vaccine until 3 months after the monocolonal treatment. We are approaching that at the end of January. Any recommendations on which vaccine to get and any info we should know about getting first vaccine after all of this?
Thank you

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Welcome @nichirschfield. That must've been very frightening for both of you for your husband to have had such a severe case of COVID.

Mayo Clinic also advises waiting 90 days (3 months) after monoclonal antibody treatment before getting the vaccine. Mayo Clinic and the CDC recommend getting an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine over getting the Janssen/Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine.

"Recent research also suggests that people who got COVID-19 in 2020 and then received mRNA vaccines produce very high levels of antibodies that are likely effective against current and, possibly, future variants. Some scientists call this hybrid immunity. Further research is needed."
Read more here: https://www.mayoclinic.org/coronavirus-covid-19/vaccine-if-already-had-covid

Here's a comparison chart of the vaccines.
– Comparing the differences between COVID-19 vaccines https://www.mayoclinic.org/coronavirus-covid-19/vaccine/comparing-vaccines

nichirschfield: How is your husband feeling now?

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I'm not a doc but I wouldn't recommend a shot to him now. There is enough data to show that Natural Immunity after recovering from Covid is stronger and lasting longer than the shots. Unless there is a co morbidity that I"m unaware of. I'd hold off on those shots……….
I got a 1st and only Pfizer shot 2.5 months after recovering from Covid and I've been a long hauler three days after the shot and haven't gotten rid of it yet. That was six months ago!

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Hey CD what symptoms are you having after the shot? I had a similar experience. I had bad covid for a month, recovered for a few weeks, got my first Pfizer shot and got very sick again a few days after. It was just like I had covid all over again. Most all of the same symptoms. I have been sick ever since. It has been two months since the shot and 4 months since covid diagnosis. I have bad fatigue, headaches, insomnia, and respiratory issues all over again.

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He just got the Pfizer vax on Tuesday and so far is doing great. He was sore for a day but after a little Ibprufin felt fine. I hope you feel better soon.

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I am not a doctor but from what I am reading, your t-cells should serve you well. Also the Novavax vaccination with fewer side effects hopefully will be coming out soon. These are just my thoughts. Research on non-censored search engines to find out as much information as you can and decide for yourself what is best for you.

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@connie1977

I am not a doctor but from what I am reading, your t-cells should serve you well. Also the Novavax vaccination with fewer side effects hopefully will be coming out soon. These are just my thoughts. Research on non-censored search engines to find out as much information as you can and decide for yourself what is best for you.

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When researching a medical topic, people should be searching respected medical & scientific databases and sources (NIH, The New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Mayo Clinic research, John Hopkins, Kaiser Permanente, etc.). That is where professionals and your doctors go to get latest information on medical issues. Unfortunately, the general public does not understand this research concept and is not knowledgeable about the existence of such resources. The public mistakenly thinks googling something and pulling up claims from unknown individuals, with no credentials on the subject is of value. NO, IT IS DANGEROUS TO YOUR HEALTH! Real medical information comes from known respected sources, and experts with substantial credentials who are highly respected by their peers.

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From the Mayo Clinic News Network https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/covid-queries-do-i-need-the-vaccine-if-ive-had-covid-19/
Q: I already had COVID-19 and recovered. Why should I get the vaccine when my body is already immune to it now?
Expert A: When someone has had an infection, and the body has produced antibodies as a result, this is called "natural immunity." But early evidence suggests natural immunity to COVID-19 may not be very long-lasting.

At least one study indicates that if you had COVID-19 and are not vaccinated, your risk of getting COVID-19 a second time are about two times greater than for people who were infected but did get vaccinated.

"Even if you've had COVID-19, whether it was a mild case or more severe, we still very much recommend that you get the vaccine," says Martin Herrmann, M.D., medical director of Mayo Clinic Health System in Waseca and New Prague. "It's important to do all you can to protect yourself against this virus. Plus, getting vaccinated protects others as well because it reduces the spread of COVID-19."

One caveat to keep in mind is that if you've recently had COVID-19 and were treated with monoclonal antibodies, you should delay your vaccination for about 90 days. Monoclonal antibodies are proteins made in a laboratory that mimic the body's immune response, and they can keep you from developing a robust response to the vaccine.

Mayo experts, including Dr. Poland, continue to urge COVID-19 vaccinations and boosters as the best defense against the latest variants.

"By getting two doses of vaccine and a booster, or a dose of Johnson & Johnson and a booster, you move yourself into a category of maximal protection such that if you have a normal immune system, you are probably going to have trivial or even asymptomatic disease if you get infected with COVID-19," explains Dr. Poland.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland discusses the latest information on COVID-19 and answers listener questions.

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Unfortunately, there is very little information regarding clinical studies for people with autoimmune diseases and taking vaccine. There is conflicting information regarding immunity after contracting COVID. Some very reliable sources say that it lasts longer than the vaccine. Some say vaccine lasts longer. We do know vaccines do not last that long. We know this to be true now because of all the breakthrough cases. (Booster requirement) Yes, I believe in the vaccine, but, because of the very many variables, such as medication one is taking, current health, etc., not all autoimmune diseases are the same and should not be lumped together. Decisions should be researched and reached with your own physician.

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@vic83

When researching a medical topic, people should be searching respected medical & scientific databases and sources (NIH, The New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Mayo Clinic research, John Hopkins, Kaiser Permanente, etc.). That is where professionals and your doctors go to get latest information on medical issues. Unfortunately, the general public does not understand this research concept and is not knowledgeable about the existence of such resources. The public mistakenly thinks googling something and pulling up claims from unknown individuals, with no credentials on the subject is of value. NO, IT IS DANGEROUS TO YOUR HEALTH! Real medical information comes from known respected sources, and experts with substantial credentials who are highly respected by their peers.

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With all due respect, sometimes respected sources say one thing and then say something else three months later. But, I generally agree with your statements. I wouldn’t shout out my reply though. (regarding public)

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@apliebs

With all due respect, sometimes respected sources say one thing and then say something else three months later. But, I generally agree with your statements. I wouldn’t shout out my reply though. (regarding public)

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I appreciate your doubts, however, it is an example of how the general public does not understand the concept of research. I am a retired market research professional from high tech with lots of experience in data analysis, forecasting and database design. My subject was not medical but technical and economic, however the skill set is similar. WHY DOES GUIDANCE CHANGE OVER TIME? Because one starts with similar situations, creates a model, and then adjusts it as more data comes in. Any type of forecasting does this. Also, one must be aware of context, that is the "big picture". For example, what seems a high value by itself is not so when seen against a whole population of similar. And research also triangulates data points for a position. The general public is ill prepared to judge what ever pops up in a google search. Doctors in one specialty claiming knowledge in another is an example. Judgements on medical issues requires organized research with a systematic collection of data, viewed in the overall relevant context. This requires resources and people with the appropriate skill set. That is why one should consult the real research institutions. The criticism of these institutions is unwarranted. We are living with a NEW virus which mutates….medical research follows it and makes the most informed call it can as more information is documented.

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