Reversal of a fundoplication

Posted by Pawsboy9 @pawsboy9, Aug 5, 2012

I had a hernia and the fundoplication done in February as post this my chest is on fire. Going back to see the surgeon who did it on Tuesday. Has anybody had the same experience? If this guy does not have a answer heading for Mayo.

Thanks
Dennis

@pdilly

Wow. Just read thru all these posts. I’m scared.
My surgeon who just did the 4th RFA on my Barrett’s esophagus yesterday says my Nissen fundiplication has come completely undone and he wants me to have it done again before my next RFA in December.
Most of the posts on this thread are very negative — and understandably so! I’m so sorry for everyone who has suffered from such terrible complications after having the Nissen fundiplication.
But there were a few positive posts.
My question is this: does anyone know what the success rate is for Nissen fundiplication? Or does anyone know where I could find that kind of information?

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My Mayo doctor said 1 in 6 Nissen operations go bad and/ or have negitive complications.

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Go to Mayo before you do anything else.. get an appointment as soon as possible.. My Nissen could not be reversed was the determination at Mayo.. 1 in 6 Nissen operations have complications

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@pdilly

Wow. Just read thru all these posts. I’m scared.
My surgeon who just did the 4th RFA on my Barrett’s esophagus yesterday says my Nissen fundiplication has come completely undone and he wants me to have it done again before my next RFA in December.
Most of the posts on this thread are very negative — and understandably so! I’m so sorry for everyone who has suffered from such terrible complications after having the Nissen fundiplication.
But there were a few positive posts.
My question is this: does anyone know what the success rate is for Nissen fundiplication? Or does anyone know where I could find that kind of information?

Jump to this post

I would suggest to have an esophagram and barium swallow done to check the severity of reflux and to also have an esophageal motility study done to see if you swallow is normal. If it is have the LINX band placed.
I just went through all this last Dec. and had surgery in Jan 2019. I had a rerepair of a large hiatal hernia, the slipped wrap from a a 24 yr old Nissan was removed,so my stomach is normal now and LINX band placed. I'm reflux free for the first time in 30yrs.
If you get the LINX band you must eat every 2-3 hrs for at least 3 months to stretch the band while scar tissue forms around it so as to prevent the scar tissue from creating a stricture enveloping the band and making swallowing more difficult.
Once the reflux stops you can wean off the PPIs. I've weaned very slowly off my prevacid because I was double dosed for many many years. I've read that you can develop really bad rebound acid production if you don't. This week is my last week of prevacid where I am only taking 2 for the whole week. Yeah!
This month I am having my 1st Endo since surgery to see if the last 2cm of Barrett's just above the LES healed up. If not this will be RFA #6. Hopefully it will be the last. I use to have 8cm of Barrett's and medicated for over 24yrs with PPIs. This alone will depleat your B12 stores and cause Calcium loss in your bones.
Make sure you know what your bone density is and your B12 levels because your binding capacity will be low.
Good luck with everything 🙂

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Thank you @ken82 and @sylvias – so 17% of Nissen fundiplications result in complications if I’m doing my math right. That means 83% go well — and that makes me feel better!
Mine won’t be a Nissen reversal actually. Sounds more like it will just be a second Nissen since my first one no longer exists! I’ll Confirm that after I talk to my gastro doc and Nissen surgeon.
I don’t think I’m a candidate for linx. When I had my first Nissen they said at least a third of my stomach was in my esophagus and the opening between the 2 was huge. But I will ask about it.
I am fortunate to have docs who keep very close tabs on all of my “levels” — B12, calcium, magnesium, etc.! So far so good even after over 20 years of Prevacid!
Congratulations on your last week of prevacid — that is soooooo amazing!

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Hello, I’m new to this group, but I can see that there is a lot of experience here. There are a lot of unhappy experiences out there and I might say that I’m one of them, but I naturally want to avoid making it worst. I’ve got a very unique situation and have encountered a variety of problems in getting diagnosed and establishing a path back to health. Since this group is focused on GI, I will also, but my issues actually involve neural and vascular as well. I’ll try to be as specific as possible, but I must apologize for such a long narration. It may not be obvious, but this is a highly condensed version of the issues that I have to navigate.

I have been motivated by an periodic abdominal just to the right of the solar plexus. It can wax and wane over months. It can also be a mild nusance or drop me to my knees gasping for breath. My gallbladder was deficient and was removed 2 years ago in the hope of relief, it did not help.

I had a nissen & highly selective vagotomy about 15 years ago. It was successful up to a couple of years ago and it has now “slipped” and appears to be hanging on the esophagus below an enlarged hiatal hernia. I’ve recently underwent the gastric emptying test that showed a delayed action on the first hour. i.e. gastroparesis. If this is a complication from the Nissen, I don’t know, but in my opinion a pyloroplasty will most likely make things worst. That leaves my main question. My options are 1) do nothing 2) Nissen redo 3) Nissen unwrap. I’m tempted to go with the unwrap, but I would like to find out what to expect.

Working out from that issue, right next door, just a inch or two away, I have a celiac stenosis, which fits the classical pattern for MALs (Median Arcuate Ligament syndrome). This can inhibit blood flow to the digestive system. Unfortunately, completely unrelated to me, there is an academic dispute regarding the legitimacy of the syndrome. It turns out that Stanford, where I have been evaluated, does not consider this to be valid condition. If being caught up in this argument wasn’t frustrating enough, their vascular surgeons have completely invalidated their “objectivity” on a unrelated matter.

About 10 years ago, I came down with a idiopathic peripheral neuropathy with a devastating fatigue. To control the pain, I’ve been seeing a pain specialist that has kept me on a moderate dose of methadone. At my first appointment with Stanford’s vascular department, they immediately classified me as a drug abuser and things went downhill from there. They concluded that methadone is only used for heroin addiction and could not understand why I was taking it since I never even tried heroin. That physician offered no help in any form, no testing, no useful referrals, and then wrote a false narrative that included some actual facts, but altered the context and sequence of events. Just to be sure, he phrased it to make me sound like the classical abuser, not an actual patient. In short, he did everything in his power to keep me from decent medical care.

Obviously, I’m still angry about this. Especially since that report has played out in following visits where I was subjected to very abusive treatment from the very doctors that are suppose to help. However, I persisted and finally got a bit of my message out, but even so, the bariatric surgeon that I’m presently talking too can only offer an opinion on the digestive side of my case. Obviously, however, the digestive tract cannot function properly without an adequate flow of blood. The laparoscopic entry is identical for both the Nissen and MALs. I’ve already had my gallbladder out in an attempt to alieviate the abdominal pain, so I don’t want to break this out into multiple surgeries. But, then Stanford does not subscribe to the MALs diagnosis and apparently doesn’t consider a celiac stenosis to be a serious condition because it is “widely patent”, meaning other vessels feed the organs. Except I’ve had GI troubles for over 35 years, at any rate, though, Stanford’s vascular department has lost all credibility for me. Which means my surgeon can only focus on half of my issue and leaves me in a position of having to go “shopping” for a diagnosis. It is a dilemma.

All this leaves me with a great deal of uncertainty as to how to find help. That is why I am considering to just have the Nissen unwrapped and learn to deal with the reflux. I already have the Barrett’s esophagus anyhow, which is what the original surgery was intended to prevent.

Well, thanks to anyone that can provide some insight into these problems. Hope to hear from you all soon.

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