Prolia treatment for osteoporosis

Posted by Veruska @veriska, Mar 7, 2017

I received the results from my bone test and they have recommended I start Prolia. I have read the side effects and I am concerned. Has anyone use this drug and if so what side effects have you experienced. Thank you

@sue225

I am about to get my third injection! Oh oh. I refused medication year after year, bone density test after bone density test until there was a 19% drop in the b.d. of my spine in an 18 month period. At the rate I was going, I would soon be spineless.
I did the research. All the drugs terrify me. But, time was no longer on my side. For me, the thought of losing my independence, of having to spend life in a wheel chair and all that entails scares me much more. My quality of life has always been somewhat compromised by gastrointestinal issues, chronic pain issues due to lots of osteoarthritis so I didnt want a fracture as well.
I remember the endocrinologist saying to me on one visit, " I've seen patients on the other side" (meaning those who chose not to take meds). And she referred to a patient who was still in a wheel chair two years after a hip fracture.
I dont like some of what I read in the studies either but
in my case, at this stage in my life, I felt Prolia was the best option.

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@sue225 This is a bridge that I have not had to cross yet but I can really understand your feelings. It is not an easy decision. I don't think adding any drug to your regimen is easy.

I had my PCP appointment yesterday and although I am doing extremely well overall, I am borderline high BP and cholesterol. He would like me to start on medications for them. I told I would think about it, and check out the side effects. He was OK with that. He wants me to speak to my endocrinologist about it too when I see him in the summer. Apparently having diabetes adds to the risks of these things.
JK

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@mabel343

I agree that no one knows the long-term effects of these drugs. I stopped Prolia after three injections due to a number of side effects, and regret not doing enough research before starting. My internist had been telling me for ten years that I HAD to do something and that the choices were Prolia and Forteo, so I rather blindly agreed to Prolia. I was not told about the potential for rebound fractures when stopping, hence, the need to stay on it forever or switch to another drug. I had extreme fatigue, a persistent cough with mucous, episodes of vertigo, acid reflux, joint pain, itchy skin, and hair loss, with most setting in after the third injection. I saw specialists to rule out other causes for those conditions before deciding to stop Prolia. All of those conditions have improved since stopping. If I were fracturing, I would be more willing to endure side effects, but I am not willing to endure a dramatic loss of quality of life otherwise. And I am now taking my chances that I will be one who suffers rebound fracturing, because I didn't go on another drug. I feel that I am worse off than when I started. I am also one of those who was prescribed Fosamax in the mid-90s when it first came out as a preventative measure, and I didn't even have osteoporosis. It was prescribed to me year after year for nearly 15 years. I just recently learned through my extensive research on these drugs that Fosamax taken for that long can permanently alter the structure of the bones, and is now prescribed for only a very short period of time. All of that said, I know that there are people who take Prolia with no side effects, and that it can be a godsend to someone who is fracturing.

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Hello Sister: You are singing my song. I am on your team. Bravo for your speaking up. Thank you for sharing.

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@contentandwell

@sue225 This is a bridge that I have not had to cross yet but I can really understand your feelings. It is not an easy decision. I don't think adding any drug to your regimen is easy.

I had my PCP appointment yesterday and although I am doing extremely well overall, I am borderline high BP and cholesterol. He would like me to start on medications for them. I told I would think about it, and check out the side effects. He was OK with that. He wants me to speak to my endocrinologist about it too when I see him in the summer. Apparently having diabetes adds to the risks of these things.
JK

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Yes, in the last two years I went from being on no medications to being on 3! As someone who is now being treated for my stratosphere high cholesterol (I am slim and eat a healthy diet), I recommend trying to lower the cholesterol with diet first. (oatmeal, almonds, beans, lentils, eggplant, okra, tofu, apples, oranges)–all of these foods definitely lower cholesterol. Healthy oils like olive oil and canola. I was not able to tolerate statins. So, I now inject myself with Repatha twice a month. It works. However, if I just had borderline cholesterol, I'd try diet first. Realize with diabetes there are dietary restrictions.
I have a strong suspicion that Prolia pushed my cholesterol levels higher and altered the ratio of hdl:ldl. In any event, it had to be treated prior to being on Prolia and the ldl has dropped 50% on Repatha.
Sometimes diet, exercise and healthy living is not enough. I'm sure your endocrinologist will sort things out for you. Stay healthy.

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@sue225 I'm with you on high cholesterol.Cant get mine down ,diet doesn't do it so Dr put me on Crestor I,ll get blood work done later part of June hope it's down

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@lioness

@sue225 I'm with you on high cholesterol.Cant get mine down ,diet doesn't do it so Dr put me on Crestor I,ll get blood work done later part of June hope it's down

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Fingers-crossed!

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@sue225

Yes, in the last two years I went from being on no medications to being on 3! As someone who is now being treated for my stratosphere high cholesterol (I am slim and eat a healthy diet), I recommend trying to lower the cholesterol with diet first. (oatmeal, almonds, beans, lentils, eggplant, okra, tofu, apples, oranges)–all of these foods definitely lower cholesterol. Healthy oils like olive oil and canola. I was not able to tolerate statins. So, I now inject myself with Repatha twice a month. It works. However, if I just had borderline cholesterol, I'd try diet first. Realize with diabetes there are dietary restrictions.
I have a strong suspicion that Prolia pushed my cholesterol levels higher and altered the ratio of hdl:ldl. In any event, it had to be treated prior to being on Prolia and the ldl has dropped 50% on Repatha.
Sometimes diet, exercise and healthy living is not enough. I'm sure your endocrinologist will sort things out for you. Stay healthy.

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Hi — shitaki mushroom are helpful in raising the good cholesterol and lowering the bad.

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@sue225

Yes, in the last two years I went from being on no medications to being on 3! As someone who is now being treated for my stratosphere high cholesterol (I am slim and eat a healthy diet), I recommend trying to lower the cholesterol with diet first. (oatmeal, almonds, beans, lentils, eggplant, okra, tofu, apples, oranges)–all of these foods definitely lower cholesterol. Healthy oils like olive oil and canola. I was not able to tolerate statins. So, I now inject myself with Repatha twice a month. It works. However, if I just had borderline cholesterol, I'd try diet first. Realize with diabetes there are dietary restrictions.
I have a strong suspicion that Prolia pushed my cholesterol levels higher and altered the ratio of hdl:ldl. In any event, it had to be treated prior to being on Prolia and the ldl has dropped 50% on Repatha.
Sometimes diet, exercise and healthy living is not enough. I'm sure your endocrinologist will sort things out for you. Stay healthy.

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@sue225 Thank you for the suggestions. I do eat oatmeal about 3 times a week, almonds, and healthy oils. I guess I will have to consider the other things you mention.
JK

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@contentandwell

@sue225 Thank you for the suggestions. I do eat oatmeal about 3 times a week, almonds, and healthy oils. I guess I will have to consider the other things you mention.
JK

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These foods I mentioned are part of the "Portfolio Diet". It is a plant-based diet designed to lower cholesterol by as much as 30%. It was developed by a number of researchers at St.Michael's hospital in Toronto. Google Dr. David Jenkins who is a Professor of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Toronto and head of a clinic at St. Michael's Hospital. He developed the concept of the glycemic index.
The diet works. I did follow it for about 2 years with the exclusion of barley and whole wheat grains as I am a celiac. Dr. Jenkins practices what he preaches: he is a vegan. I still make a delicious baked tofu dish on a regular basis.

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Why did you quit after 2 years?

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I did not quit 100%. I still incorporate some aspects of the diet on a regular basis. I have an irritable bowel so some of those foods dont like me: beans, lentils. I still eat nuts and peanut butter and tofu. I am not a vegetarian and eat mainly fish and chicken. Very very little red meat. Lots of fruit and veg. The foods on this diet have "viscous fibre" which helps move the cholesterol out of the body. And I dont have eggs (just egg whites). I use the margarine with the plant sterols that lower cholesterol (Becel's ProActive in Canada, Promise in the U.S.) I only eat very low fat cheese and I read nutritional labels carefully and stay away from anything that is high in saturated fat. I guess I just didnt want to be so super strict but my diet is still pretty good.

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Thanks for your reply. That is pretty much the way I eat – have eaten for YEARS. My elevated cholesterol is inherited – I take atorvastatin.

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@lippemouse

Thanks for your reply. That is pretty much the way I eat – have eaten for YEARS. My elevated cholesterol is inherited – I take atorvastatin.

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I believe mine is inherited as well (my late father). I would prefer to be on a statin rather than Repatha but couldnt tolerate them.

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@cireland

Hi — shitaki mushroom are helpful in raising the good cholesterol and lowering the bad.

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@cireland I love mushrooms, but shitake mushrooms have an odd taste to me and I don't care for them much.

@sue225 I actually already do eat many of the things mentioned. I guess I will try to cut out egg yolks. I generally have about three eggs a week. The last time I tried to eat whites without yolks, or with a low proportion of yolks to whites, it upset my stomach and then I read that egg whites are more apt to cause a reaction then egg yolks! When that happens if I don't eat any eggs for a while I can then return to eating them.

I've been using the vegan version of "I can't believe it's not butter" because that has no dairy in it, and I have recently come to realize that some problems I have been having are from lactose intolerance.
JK

Liked by lioness

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@sue225

I believe mine is inherited as well (my late father). I would prefer to be on a statin rather than Repatha but couldnt tolerate them.

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Well, my father had four things wrong and I only got one – so I am OK. I am able to tolerate the statin and Fosimax also. My Mother is turning 100 next month and her brother is 98. I am very active and involved in LOTS of things so I hope that I can be around for a long time. I still work – making jewelry.

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@lippemouse

Well, my father had four things wrong and I only got one – so I am OK. I am able to tolerate the statin and Fosimax also. My Mother is turning 100 next month and her brother is 98. I am very active and involved in LOTS of things so I hope that I can be around for a long time. I still work – making jewelry.

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How lucky you are to still have your parents! Maybe you have inherited the longevity gene.

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