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Pre -Transplant Diet and Exercise Ideas

Posted by @rosemarya, Jul 23, 2018

Once you find out you need a transplant, you will learn that there are some things that you can do before surgery to ensure that you are prepared.

-If you smoke, you should quit.
-Eat healthy foods like fruits, vegetables, lean protein, and whole grains.
-Exercise to maintain your energy level as you are able.
-Get plenty of rest.

Now..we all know that it is much more difficult to achieve success with our complications….but it is worth it to know it will make life much easier on the other side…and that you gave it your all!

Anyone who wants to share diet and exercise ideas..please do…be creative!

REPLY

@mlmcg

I do not like the word sugar-free. Just what does it mean; no added natural sugar (cane, beet, honey or maple sugar), no added artificial sugars (chemically made), or things like corn syrup – it's not sugar because sugar isn't in its name. Just what is a sugar free Popsicle? I don't eat them so I don't know if you mean frozen fruit juices or flavored ice cubes with no added sweeteners? I need some help here. Once you got that new kidney it was too easy eating foods that you couldn't eat before and "chow down" on unhealthy foods now. I sat by a man, when I was no dialysis, who received a kidney when he was 19, and like all teenagers, he "chowed down" on everything in sight and ended up over 400 lbs. then lost his kidney. When I met him he was down to 300 lbs. and had to loose another 100 before he could be evaluated for another kidney.

If you believe eating "vegie soups" so you can have all the "snacks" you want will leave you with "no negative impact on your health" you could be so wrong. Once you were given a new lease on life, with the transplant, you need to care for your new kidney so it will care for you. Once you loose that kidney, for whatever reason, you may never get a chance to receive another one again. In order to keep our new kidneys we all have to have a new "life style", not a diet, which can change from day to day, but a "life style" which becomes our way of life for ever and ever.

mlmcg

Jump to this post

Thank you for your kind words. Every time I pick up a food coutainer in a store I check the label. The first thing I check is the amount of sodium per serving, if the sodium is over 140 mg, then I check how many servings per container. If the sodium is over 200 I check to see if I will be eating a full serving at one time or not. If the sodium level is around or above 500, I just put it back. Sodium will make you hungry, that is why manufactures put so much in their foods they want you to buy and eat their foods.

I was raised eating vegetables from our garden. I learned to can as a teenager then along came the home freezer. I eat foods from the freezer section of the store now. I live by myself and if I buy fruits or vegetables from the store they were picked while they were "green" so by the time we buy them they look ripe, but they're not. If you can't smell the wonderful aroma of the fruit or vegetable they have lost all of the nutrients too. If you want fresh, go to a farmer's market when it opens in the morning. If you are unable to go to a farmer's market, buy frozen then canned or dried fruits. The frozen foods are processed down the road from where they are grown, the same is true with canned, they are picked at the peak of freshness. These farm's do not grow food for the grocery stores.

Most of our eating habits are learned at our mother's knee. If we have family get-to-gathers and all the food is high in animal fat, high in sodium and sugar it is hard to say "No, thank you." Even friends are not always good at fixing foods best for us. We can always take our own foods and get strange looks at what we are eating. Aunt So-and-so would say "I fixed this just for you, because you always ate it as a child." You didn't like it then and you hate it now, how do you tell Aunt So-and-so "No, thank you."?

When it comes to recipes, over the years I have collected cookbooks and magazines. I like to learn new things, and I like to adjust recipes if I find a recipe that is heave on fat, sodium, or sugar I say "No." I have foods I enjoy and are healthy so I try finding a recipe that has these foods in them. I substitute foods I like, and can have, for foods I don't like, or can't have, and I have found new flavors that I really like. Seeing a Registered Dietitian, who is willing to work with you where you are, can give each individual the best help. Having the entire family willing to work with one individual can improve their own "life style" and they too will feel better. It takes a village to….

mlmcg

@mlmcg

I do not like the word sugar-free. Just what does it mean; no added natural sugar (cane, beet, honey or maple sugar), no added artificial sugars (chemically made), or things like corn syrup – it's not sugar because sugar isn't in its name. Just what is a sugar free Popsicle? I don't eat them so I don't know if you mean frozen fruit juices or flavored ice cubes with no added sweeteners? I need some help here. Once you got that new kidney it was too easy eating foods that you couldn't eat before and "chow down" on unhealthy foods now. I sat by a man, when I was no dialysis, who received a kidney when he was 19, and like all teenagers, he "chowed down" on everything in sight and ended up over 400 lbs. then lost his kidney. When I met him he was down to 300 lbs. and had to loose another 100 before he could be evaluated for another kidney.

If you believe eating "vegie soups" so you can have all the "snacks" you want will leave you with "no negative impact on your health" you could be so wrong. Once you were given a new lease on life, with the transplant, you need to care for your new kidney so it will care for you. Once you loose that kidney, for whatever reason, you may never get a chance to receive another one again. In order to keep our new kidneys we all have to have a new "life style", not a diet, which can change from day to day, but a "life style" which becomes our way of life for ever and ever.

mlmcg

Jump to this post

Popsicle – If it has artificial "sugar" sweeteners in it, I would be in the bathroom (artificial sweeteners is my list of things I cannot have, it sends me to the bathroom every time). Are the ingredients listed or just 15 calories?

If your meds are making you feel hungry see if they can be changed. I have never had that problem, my meds have been changed over the last 10 years.

Your vegie soup sounds good, I can't have cabbage, I never liked it cooked so I would leave it out. However, I didn't see any mention of animal protein in your soup. We all need protein in one form or another, daily, not just occasionally. How large are your bowls? A one cup bowl or a three cup bowl? Is your soup heavy on the liquid side or vegie side? Protein, either kind, is more likely to fill you up where vegetables take a lot more to do the same. Are you eating any grains? There was no mention of breakfast or dinner, is that where you get your protein and grains? The body needs a well balanced diet each day. One third in the morning, one third at noon, and one third at the end of the day. The morning meal should be the largest and the evening the smallest.

Is your ideal weight range, yours? Or your dietitians? If it's yours and you have not talked with a dietitian you may want to talk with one as soon as you can. Even if it's a couple of times, we can all use help in getting to know how to care for our kidneys. Doctors are not always the best one to talk with about our meals. Doctors know how to fix kidneys, but not necessarily how to care for them once they are ours. Good luck.

mlmcg

Liked by jeanne5009

@teresatopeka

I have had two liver transplants at Mayo Rochester. I am also a Physical Therapist with a specialty certification in Aquatic Physical Therapy. I have found from professional and work experience, that gentle aquatic aerobic exercise in therapy pools (warmer than lap pools) is very comfortable for patients and there are very few health risks. Something to consider before seeking this out is if you have an open wounds, ostomy sites or issues with fecal/urinary incontinence. Don’t worry about not being able to get into and out off the pool because most Therapy pools have a lift or a walk in/out ramp to make it easier. Often times for patients with extreme muscle wasting, this is a great way to ease back into exercise without stressing the joints too much and is often very relaxing. Plus, I may be biased here, Aquatic PTs are super friendly and fun! The goal with this is to refer you to a community based exercise program. Many hospitals have this integrated into their Rehabilitarion program in some way, shape or form.

I could not swim after either transplant because I had a rather large wound to heal, but what I did in the hospital was request a PT consult and started walking right away. It comfortable at the first, but the more you walk the better you will feel. I learned that the hard way after my first transplant where I refused to get out of bed and sat and pushed my PCA button whenever I had increased pain.The second time around I was walking a mile post op day 1 and had the PT bring in a little bedside bike pedal to use whenever I was sitting up and watching tv or reading. And depending on your platelets post op, you can begin gentle upper extremity stretching in a variety of positions which helps with healing, swelling, and mobility. I always tried to adhere to what is common referred to as “Sternal precautions.” This is a basic set of guidelines given to patients who have had open heart surgery but came somewhat apply to lost liver transplant patient with some modifications. Briefly, they are:

1. Protect your sternum. Hug a pillow to your chest or cross your arms over your chest when you laugh, sneeze, or cough.

2. Be careful when you get into or out of a chair or bed. Hug a pillow or cross your arms when you stand or sit. Do not twist as you move. Use only your legs to sit and stand. You may need to use a raised toilet seat if you have trouble standing up without using your arms. Your healthcare provider may teach you to use your elbow for support as you move from lying to sitting.

3. Ask when you may take a bath or shower. You may need to use a bath chair if you have trouble getting into or out of the tub. Do not use a grab bar. Depending on where you are transplanted at, they may have different protocols for when you can shower after surgery.

4.Do not lift or carry anything heavier than 5 pounds. For example, a gallon of milk weighs 8 lbs.

5. Try to use both arms and hands for any reaching or grabbing of objects around you. Do not let anyone pull your arms to help you move or dress.

6. Do not push or pull anything. Examples include a car door or a vacuum cleaner.

7. Do not drive while you are healing. Your surgeon will tell you when it is safe for you to start driving again.

Depending on how you heal, you age and previous strength and flexibility prior to transplant, the PT can modify these to fit your particular needs.

After two liver transplants I have learned that physical fitness and diet are keys to living a long healthy life after transplant. Whenever I don’t want to go swim my 2 miles in the pool or eat my greens, I always remember that I am not just doing this for me, but for the person and the family who gave a part of their life so that I might live a little long!

Be well,

Teresa H.

Jump to this post

My cousin sent me a little pedal bike after my strokes, because I was using them in rehab and liked how I felt afterwords. They use different muscles than walking, now if there was something small for walking.

I did not have problems walking after my transplant, just after my strokes. I use a walker now, because my balance is not good. Good enough that I do not qualify for Medicare to approve of me to take a balance class. I walk outside, using my walker, with others around. I will walk inside at home without my walker.

Anyone who needs the exercise and cannot ride a bike, the little pedal bike is great, and not expensive.

mlmcg

@teresatopeka

I have had two liver transplants at Mayo Rochester. I am also a Physical Therapist with a specialty certification in Aquatic Physical Therapy. I have found from professional and work experience, that gentle aquatic aerobic exercise in therapy pools (warmer than lap pools) is very comfortable for patients and there are very few health risks. Something to consider before seeking this out is if you have an open wounds, ostomy sites or issues with fecal/urinary incontinence. Don’t worry about not being able to get into and out off the pool because most Therapy pools have a lift or a walk in/out ramp to make it easier. Often times for patients with extreme muscle wasting, this is a great way to ease back into exercise without stressing the joints too much and is often very relaxing. Plus, I may be biased here, Aquatic PTs are super friendly and fun! The goal with this is to refer you to a community based exercise program. Many hospitals have this integrated into their Rehabilitarion program in some way, shape or form.

I could not swim after either transplant because I had a rather large wound to heal, but what I did in the hospital was request a PT consult and started walking right away. It comfortable at the first, but the more you walk the better you will feel. I learned that the hard way after my first transplant where I refused to get out of bed and sat and pushed my PCA button whenever I had increased pain.The second time around I was walking a mile post op day 1 and had the PT bring in a little bedside bike pedal to use whenever I was sitting up and watching tv or reading. And depending on your platelets post op, you can begin gentle upper extremity stretching in a variety of positions which helps with healing, swelling, and mobility. I always tried to adhere to what is common referred to as “Sternal precautions.” This is a basic set of guidelines given to patients who have had open heart surgery but came somewhat apply to lost liver transplant patient with some modifications. Briefly, they are:

1. Protect your sternum. Hug a pillow to your chest or cross your arms over your chest when you laugh, sneeze, or cough.

2. Be careful when you get into or out of a chair or bed. Hug a pillow or cross your arms when you stand or sit. Do not twist as you move. Use only your legs to sit and stand. You may need to use a raised toilet seat if you have trouble standing up without using your arms. Your healthcare provider may teach you to use your elbow for support as you move from lying to sitting.

3. Ask when you may take a bath or shower. You may need to use a bath chair if you have trouble getting into or out of the tub. Do not use a grab bar. Depending on where you are transplanted at, they may have different protocols for when you can shower after surgery.

4.Do not lift or carry anything heavier than 5 pounds. For example, a gallon of milk weighs 8 lbs.

5. Try to use both arms and hands for any reaching or grabbing of objects around you. Do not let anyone pull your arms to help you move or dress.

6. Do not push or pull anything. Examples include a car door or a vacuum cleaner.

7. Do not drive while you are healing. Your surgeon will tell you when it is safe for you to start driving again.

Depending on how you heal, you age and previous strength and flexibility prior to transplant, the PT can modify these to fit your particular needs.

After two liver transplants I have learned that physical fitness and diet are keys to living a long healthy life after transplant. Whenever I don’t want to go swim my 2 miles in the pool or eat my greens, I always remember that I am not just doing this for me, but for the person and the family who gave a part of their life so that I might live a little long!

Be well,

Teresa H.

Jump to this post

@teresatopeka
What super advice…thanks for sharing.

@jodeej

My husband had his liver transplant 17 days ago. He is doing fantastic and he attributes it to the fact that he was able to go out and jog / walk a couple times a week while waiting. He also ate healthy. It has made a world of difference for him!
Blessings,
JoDee

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@jodeej That's great! I hope he is feeling well and doing great after his transplant. If you told us this somewhere right after his transplant I somehow missed it, it's been a busy summer here. I am really excited for him and for you. It's such a wondrous time to finally have that horrible issue behind you, to have a clear head all of the time, to not be retaining horrible amounts of fluid, and for me to not have my hands shaking all of the time.
I agree, that the exercise he did pre-transplant really helped him through the recovery period, and eating healthy. I did so much right up until the last month when things went downhill. I am sure that was a huge help.
JK

@mlmcg

I do not like the word sugar-free. Just what does it mean; no added natural sugar (cane, beet, honey or maple sugar), no added artificial sugars (chemically made), or things like corn syrup – it's not sugar because sugar isn't in its name. Just what is a sugar free Popsicle? I don't eat them so I don't know if you mean frozen fruit juices or flavored ice cubes with no added sweeteners? I need some help here. Once you got that new kidney it was too easy eating foods that you couldn't eat before and "chow down" on unhealthy foods now. I sat by a man, when I was no dialysis, who received a kidney when he was 19, and like all teenagers, he "chowed down" on everything in sight and ended up over 400 lbs. then lost his kidney. When I met him he was down to 300 lbs. and had to loose another 100 before he could be evaluated for another kidney.

If you believe eating "vegie soups" so you can have all the "snacks" you want will leave you with "no negative impact on your health" you could be so wrong. Once you were given a new lease on life, with the transplant, you need to care for your new kidney so it will care for you. Once you loose that kidney, for whatever reason, you may never get a chance to receive another one again. In order to keep our new kidneys we all have to have a new "life style", not a diet, which can change from day to day, but a "life style" which becomes our way of life for ever and ever.

mlmcg

Jump to this post

@mlmcg
Such super advice…this really helps me.

@teresatopeka

I have had two liver transplants at Mayo Rochester. I am also a Physical Therapist with a specialty certification in Aquatic Physical Therapy. I have found from professional and work experience, that gentle aquatic aerobic exercise in therapy pools (warmer than lap pools) is very comfortable for patients and there are very few health risks. Something to consider before seeking this out is if you have an open wounds, ostomy sites or issues with fecal/urinary incontinence. Don’t worry about not being able to get into and out off the pool because most Therapy pools have a lift or a walk in/out ramp to make it easier. Often times for patients with extreme muscle wasting, this is a great way to ease back into exercise without stressing the joints too much and is often very relaxing. Plus, I may be biased here, Aquatic PTs are super friendly and fun! The goal with this is to refer you to a community based exercise program. Many hospitals have this integrated into their Rehabilitarion program in some way, shape or form.

I could not swim after either transplant because I had a rather large wound to heal, but what I did in the hospital was request a PT consult and started walking right away. It comfortable at the first, but the more you walk the better you will feel. I learned that the hard way after my first transplant where I refused to get out of bed and sat and pushed my PCA button whenever I had increased pain.The second time around I was walking a mile post op day 1 and had the PT bring in a little bedside bike pedal to use whenever I was sitting up and watching tv or reading. And depending on your platelets post op, you can begin gentle upper extremity stretching in a variety of positions which helps with healing, swelling, and mobility. I always tried to adhere to what is common referred to as “Sternal precautions.” This is a basic set of guidelines given to patients who have had open heart surgery but came somewhat apply to lost liver transplant patient with some modifications. Briefly, they are:

1. Protect your sternum. Hug a pillow to your chest or cross your arms over your chest when you laugh, sneeze, or cough.

2. Be careful when you get into or out of a chair or bed. Hug a pillow or cross your arms when you stand or sit. Do not twist as you move. Use only your legs to sit and stand. You may need to use a raised toilet seat if you have trouble standing up without using your arms. Your healthcare provider may teach you to use your elbow for support as you move from lying to sitting.

3. Ask when you may take a bath or shower. You may need to use a bath chair if you have trouble getting into or out of the tub. Do not use a grab bar. Depending on where you are transplanted at, they may have different protocols for when you can shower after surgery.

4.Do not lift or carry anything heavier than 5 pounds. For example, a gallon of milk weighs 8 lbs.

5. Try to use both arms and hands for any reaching or grabbing of objects around you. Do not let anyone pull your arms to help you move or dress.

6. Do not push or pull anything. Examples include a car door or a vacuum cleaner.

7. Do not drive while you are healing. Your surgeon will tell you when it is safe for you to start driving again.

Depending on how you heal, you age and previous strength and flexibility prior to transplant, the PT can modify these to fit your particular needs.

After two liver transplants I have learned that physical fitness and diet are keys to living a long healthy life after transplant. Whenever I don’t want to go swim my 2 miles in the pool or eat my greens, I always remember that I am not just doing this for me, but for the person and the family who gave a part of their life so that I might live a little long!

Be well,

Teresa H.

Jump to this post

@mlmcg I appreciate you mentioning the small pedal bike. Another advantage is that you can put it on a table top and use it to exercise your arms. Great for strengthening the arms (my mom used it that way in rehab).

Teresa

@kequick

Great topic, Rosemary! Last year we interviewed Heather Bamlet, RDN, LD, transplant clinical dietitian at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Rochester on the topic of weight gain AFTER transplant. She had lots of good tips for getting the scale to go down, and I assume many of these are relevant to patients looking to get healthy before their transplant too.

Cooking and Meal Planning:
-Plan meals ahead of time.
-When designing a meal, follow the MyPlate method.
-Use cooking methods that will keep the foods out of reach for snacking, such as a slow cooker.

Eating:
-Be aware of your portion sizes.
-Eat more fruits and vegetables.
-Choose whole grains, lean meats and low-fat dairy products most often.
-Keep treats like cake, candy, cookies, chips or soda to a minimum.
-If still hungry after meals using the MyPlate method, reach for more fruits and vegetables.
-Make sure you are drinking enough noncaloric fluids.

Exercise:
-Get active. Aim for at least 150 minutes of exercise weekly. It is better to split this up and do at least 20 minutes most days of the week.
-Do weight training. Add this in to boost your muscle mass after your surgeon clears you to do so, since muscle burns more calories at rest than fat does.

Here's the link to the full post: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/newsfeed-post/weight-gain-after-transplant-where-does-it-come-from-and-how-to-get-rid-of-it-2/.

Jump to this post

@kequick Portion size has always been one of my biggest downfalls. I got a very nice little kitchen scale that I use often now to make sure that my portion sizes are in the right range. Of course I do have other downfalls too — breads, chocolate, etc., but for me those are actually easier to control.
I had no-fat yogurt for breakfast this morning with fruit that I measured and some Kind granola that I also measured. If you check the labels on the Kind granola some are fairly low-carb so those are the ones I eat — my son turned me on to this as a breakfast. I do finish off with a square of high cocoa content chocolate, today was 88%. My excuse for that is that it's good for my heart, and since I can't drink red wine now I have to give something to my heart. 😉
I recorded it all on myfitnesspal and everything came out to 382 calories, 47 g of carbs, 25 g of protein, and 150 g of sodium, which is within where I want to be. Now I'm off to go to my water aerobics class after a week of being away from it for vacation. I'm going to feel it today.
JK

@jolinda

Great topic, thanks for bringing it up. I struggled with calories right after transplant because everything started tasting so good. YUM! Before my kidney transplant I was pretty toxic and I was nauseous a lot and food smelled gross to me. Everything changed with that new beautiful kidney I received and it was so hard to stop myself from chowing down on everything in sight. I started drinking herbal tea, I kept sugar free popsicles in the freezer and started making lots of vegie soup so I could enjoy snacks with no negative impact on my health. 🙂

Jump to this post

@jolinda I too was drinking herbals but then I learned that you do have to be careful because some herbals can conflict with immunosuppressants. Echinacea is definitely out, and there are a few others like some barks or roots. Some sources even rule out tumeric and ginger but from what I have learned these are fine in small quantities.
JK

@kequick

Great topic, Rosemary! Last year we interviewed Heather Bamlet, RDN, LD, transplant clinical dietitian at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Rochester on the topic of weight gain AFTER transplant. She had lots of good tips for getting the scale to go down, and I assume many of these are relevant to patients looking to get healthy before their transplant too.

Cooking and Meal Planning:
-Plan meals ahead of time.
-When designing a meal, follow the MyPlate method.
-Use cooking methods that will keep the foods out of reach for snacking, such as a slow cooker.

Eating:
-Be aware of your portion sizes.
-Eat more fruits and vegetables.
-Choose whole grains, lean meats and low-fat dairy products most often.
-Keep treats like cake, candy, cookies, chips or soda to a minimum.
-If still hungry after meals using the MyPlate method, reach for more fruits and vegetables.
-Make sure you are drinking enough noncaloric fluids.

Exercise:
-Get active. Aim for at least 150 minutes of exercise weekly. It is better to split this up and do at least 20 minutes most days of the week.
-Do weight training. Add this in to boost your muscle mass after your surgeon clears you to do so, since muscle burns more calories at rest than fat does.

Here's the link to the full post: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/newsfeed-post/weight-gain-after-transplant-where-does-it-come-from-and-how-to-get-rid-of-it-2/.

Jump to this post

That sounds delicious @contentandwell! I'm no expert but 25g of protein sounds like a great way to start the day (followed by dark chocolate of course!). Hopefully it will keep you satisfied through your workout. Have fun!

@kequick

Great topic, Rosemary! Last year we interviewed Heather Bamlet, RDN, LD, transplant clinical dietitian at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Rochester on the topic of weight gain AFTER transplant. She had lots of good tips for getting the scale to go down, and I assume many of these are relevant to patients looking to get healthy before their transplant too.

Cooking and Meal Planning:
-Plan meals ahead of time.
-When designing a meal, follow the MyPlate method.
-Use cooking methods that will keep the foods out of reach for snacking, such as a slow cooker.

Eating:
-Be aware of your portion sizes.
-Eat more fruits and vegetables.
-Choose whole grains, lean meats and low-fat dairy products most often.
-Keep treats like cake, candy, cookies, chips or soda to a minimum.
-If still hungry after meals using the MyPlate method, reach for more fruits and vegetables.
-Make sure you are drinking enough noncaloric fluids.

Exercise:
-Get active. Aim for at least 150 minutes of exercise weekly. It is better to split this up and do at least 20 minutes most days of the week.
-Do weight training. Add this in to boost your muscle mass after your surgeon clears you to do so, since muscle burns more calories at rest than fat does.

Here's the link to the full post: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/newsfeed-post/weight-gain-after-transplant-where-does-it-come-from-and-how-to-get-rid-of-it-2/.

Jump to this post

@kequick it did keep me very satisfied but I am EXHAUSTED. The class lasted about 50 minutes and then I “water jogged” for 40 more minutes. I’m ready for an afternoon nap.
JK

@kequick

Great topic, Rosemary! Last year we interviewed Heather Bamlet, RDN, LD, transplant clinical dietitian at Mayo Clinic’s campus in Rochester on the topic of weight gain AFTER transplant. She had lots of good tips for getting the scale to go down, and I assume many of these are relevant to patients looking to get healthy before their transplant too.

Cooking and Meal Planning:
-Plan meals ahead of time.
-When designing a meal, follow the MyPlate method.
-Use cooking methods that will keep the foods out of reach for snacking, such as a slow cooker.

Eating:
-Be aware of your portion sizes.
-Eat more fruits and vegetables.
-Choose whole grains, lean meats and low-fat dairy products most often.
-Keep treats like cake, candy, cookies, chips or soda to a minimum.
-If still hungry after meals using the MyPlate method, reach for more fruits and vegetables.
-Make sure you are drinking enough noncaloric fluids.

Exercise:
-Get active. Aim for at least 150 minutes of exercise weekly. It is better to split this up and do at least 20 minutes most days of the week.
-Do weight training. Add this in to boost your muscle mass after your surgeon clears you to do so, since muscle burns more calories at rest than fat does.

Here's the link to the full post: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/newsfeed-post/weight-gain-after-transplant-where-does-it-come-from-and-how-to-get-rid-of-it-2/.

Jump to this post

Portion size is a continual struggle for me. I need to invest in a kitchen scale to help me. I guess, but I'm assuming that my guesses are probably won't. Lol

@mlmcg

I do not like the word sugar-free. Just what does it mean; no added natural sugar (cane, beet, honey or maple sugar), no added artificial sugars (chemically made), or things like corn syrup – it's not sugar because sugar isn't in its name. Just what is a sugar free Popsicle? I don't eat them so I don't know if you mean frozen fruit juices or flavored ice cubes with no added sweeteners? I need some help here. Once you got that new kidney it was too easy eating foods that you couldn't eat before and "chow down" on unhealthy foods now. I sat by a man, when I was no dialysis, who received a kidney when he was 19, and like all teenagers, he "chowed down" on everything in sight and ended up over 400 lbs. then lost his kidney. When I met him he was down to 300 lbs. and had to loose another 100 before he could be evaluated for another kidney.

If you believe eating "vegie soups" so you can have all the "snacks" you want will leave you with "no negative impact on your health" you could be so wrong. Once you were given a new lease on life, with the transplant, you need to care for your new kidney so it will care for you. Once you loose that kidney, for whatever reason, you may never get a chance to receive another one again. In order to keep our new kidneys we all have to have a new "life style", not a diet, which can change from day to day, but a "life style" which becomes our way of life for ever and ever.

mlmcg

Jump to this post

I invite you to join me on higher ground. Organ failure is a devastating process and we can all learn so much by helping one another if we come together as a community. I have been very hesitant to post because I am not very confident in my writing. I decided that I don't want my fear stand in the way of sharing information with others who may benefit from my journey or from asking others for advice that I need. Typos happen, no need to exploit them.

@jolinda

Great topic, thanks for bringing it up. I struggled with calories right after transplant because everything started tasting so good. YUM! Before my kidney transplant I was pretty toxic and I was nauseous a lot and food smelled gross to me. Everything changed with that new beautiful kidney I received and it was so hard to stop myself from chowing down on everything in sight. I started drinking herbal tea, I kept sugar free popsicles in the freezer and started making lots of vegie soup so I could enjoy snacks with no negative impact on my health. 🙂

Jump to this post

Good point.
Currently I like Apple Cinnamon Tea, Chamomile and Mint.
I have run across Pomegranate which although is herbal I know doesn't mix well with my meds.
I appreciate the call out. Thanks,

@mlmcg

I do not like the word sugar-free. Just what does it mean; no added natural sugar (cane, beet, honey or maple sugar), no added artificial sugars (chemically made), or things like corn syrup – it's not sugar because sugar isn't in its name. Just what is a sugar free Popsicle? I don't eat them so I don't know if you mean frozen fruit juices or flavored ice cubes with no added sweeteners? I need some help here. Once you got that new kidney it was too easy eating foods that you couldn't eat before and "chow down" on unhealthy foods now. I sat by a man, when I was no dialysis, who received a kidney when he was 19, and like all teenagers, he "chowed down" on everything in sight and ended up over 400 lbs. then lost his kidney. When I met him he was down to 300 lbs. and had to loose another 100 before he could be evaluated for another kidney.

If you believe eating "vegie soups" so you can have all the "snacks" you want will leave you with "no negative impact on your health" you could be so wrong. Once you were given a new lease on life, with the transplant, you need to care for your new kidney so it will care for you. Once you loose that kidney, for whatever reason, you may never get a chance to receive another one again. In order to keep our new kidneys we all have to have a new "life style", not a diet, which can change from day to day, but a "life style" which becomes our way of life for ever and ever.

mlmcg

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@jolinda I haven’t had a chance to welcome you to the Transplants group on Connect. I’m so grateful that you’re here and adding your experiences and knowledge. Thank you. I have corrected the unfortunate typo as mentioned above.

Connecting with others, like you, who have ‘been there’ is so valuable for fellow members, pre and post transplant. I particularly like this discussion thread started by @rosemarya and inspired by @jeanne5009 because it takes Connect even further than mere connections. It inspires members to learn from each other, set targets, report on their progress and achieve their goals. How inspiring (I know I’m overusing the word here, but.. well it is inspiring) for you to have reached a weight that is healthy and right for you, and some of ways you maintain it. Kudos!

@mlmcg I appreciate that you have taken the time to interpret suggested food choices above and how they may or may not work for you. It is important that each person take the counsel of their transplant care team, including dietitians, and know their own bodies.

What works for one person may not work for another. For this reason, I’m quoting guidelines #1 from the Connect Community Guidelines as a gentle reminder for everyone: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/about-connect/tab/community-guidelines/
“1. Be careful about giving out medical advice
– Sharing your own experience is fine, but don't tell other members what they should do.”

Our collective experiences lead to collective knowledge.

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