'PINK SLIME' Data Base

Dear Connect Members,

Remember the poll I started about who has the ‘pink slime’ AKA Methylobacterium in their bathrooms? I have been in contact with Joseph Falkinham, a NTM reseacher and professor at Virginia Tech. He is very interested in starting a data base for where this particular bacterium is located throughout the U.S. and Canada. I have noted the locales from those of you who have already responded. Am encouraging any others with the pinkish/orange bacteria to report it back here to me. I don’t know about you, but I am excited to be a part of important research.
Please include your state and county name when submitting. Thank you in advance for helping with this poll. See e-mail below from Dr. Falkinham – Terri M.

“Dear Terri:

The source of mycobacteria in homes and buildings is the municipal water from a utility. It enters the treatment plant from the source water, usually adhering to soil particulates. The mycobacteria are disinfectant-resistant and are the few survivors of disinfection (e.g., chlorine) and have no competitors that have been killed off.

When that water reaches our homes, the mycobacteria grow in the water heaters and then are circulated throughout the house. We are currently finishing up work showing the impact of the water heater on mycobacterial numbers. Thus, the critical control point for mycobacteria might be the water heater.

I would certainly appreaciate knowing where the “Connect” group has found pink slime. You have given me an idea….I can use the NTM Foundation data base to get an idea of pink slime across the US and Canada.

Best,
Joe”

@windwalker

@sounder27 I have pink slime starting to form around my bathroom sink drain (because I am past due on my cleaning) now I am worried that my hot water tank is about to blow. It is 10 yrs old now. Scary part is; it is located in the attic (not my idea).

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Windwalker. Better start shopping for a new water heater. There are 8 year water heaters and 12 year water heaters. That is their life expectancy. I work in a Home Depot and have had to replace 2 water heaters since I have lived here. Having the water heater in the attic is a bad idea. There are trays that home improvement stores sell that can go under the water heater to catch some of the water if they burst. They also sell tankless hot water heaters nowadays.

Liked by Dee, tdrell

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@sounder27

Windwalker. Better start shopping for a new water heater. There are 8 year water heaters and 12 year water heaters. That is their life expectancy. I work in a Home Depot and have had to replace 2 water heaters since I have lived here. Having the water heater in the attic is a bad idea. There are trays that home improvement stores sell that can go under the water heater to catch some of the water if they burst. They also sell tankless hot water heaters nowadays.

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@sounder27 Thank you. Yes, I am aware of all of the above. Believe me, if I had designed this house, the water heater would NOT be in the attic! I am dreading the day it needs to be replaced. I feel I should do it before it becomes an emergency.

Liked by Dee

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@windwalker

@sounder27 Thank you. Yes, I am aware of all of the above. Believe me, if I had designed this house, the water heater would NOT be in the attic! I am dreading the day it needs to be replaced. I feel I should do it before it becomes an emergency.

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Windwalker. Proactive is always better than reactive. LOL

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@windwalker – Hi Terri, what does this "Pink Slime" really look like and where would you find it/see it? Thanks! –Dee

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I have had an orangey pinky slime residue that accumulates in my tub in Chicago, Illinois.

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@danielad

@windwalker – Hi Terri, what does this "Pink Slime" really look like and where would you find it/see it? Thanks! –Dee

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Dee, the pinkish orange stuff appears in bathrooms on tje bottoms of your plastic shower curtain liner, or around the sink drain, on the metal runner of a glass shower door, or a ring at the water line in the toilet. These are places I have seen it, especially at my old house that had well water. I have it here too, but not as prominant as my well water place.

Liked by Dee

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Yes, exactly. At bottom of shower curtain liner, and around drain. I live in a high rise condominium building in downtown Chicago.

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@windwalker

Dee, the pinkish orange stuff appears in bathrooms on tje bottoms of your plastic shower curtain liner, or around the sink drain, on the metal runner of a glass shower door, or a ring at the water line in the toilet. These are places I have seen it, especially at my old house that had well water. I have it here too, but not as prominant as my well water place.

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Thanks @windwalker and @adair. Yes, I have seen it in every house I have ever lived in, including my current house (shower door seal). What I also see are dark rings in the toilet of the guest bathroom. That happens if I forget to flush it every other week. Is that "black stuff" equally bad?
–Dee

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@danielad

Thanks @windwalker and @adair. Yes, I have seen it in every house I have ever lived in, including my current house (shower door seal). What I also see are dark rings in the toilet of the guest bathroom. That happens if I forget to flush it every other week. Is that "black stuff" equally bad?
–Dee

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@windwalker — Terri, I forgot to add that I live in a newer house, in Fairfax County, VA.

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@danielad

Thanks @windwalker and @adair. Yes, I have seen it in every house I have ever lived in, including my current house (shower door seal). What I also see are dark rings in the toilet of the guest bathroom. That happens if I forget to flush it every other week. Is that "black stuff" equally bad?
–Dee

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@danielad Dee, I do not know about that one.

Liked by Dee

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@danielad

Thanks @windwalker and @adair. Yes, I have seen it in every house I have ever lived in, including my current house (shower door seal). What I also see are dark rings in the toilet of the guest bathroom. That happens if I forget to flush it every other week. Is that "black stuff" equally bad?
–Dee

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@danielad I used to live in Richmond, Va. and Tappahannock area. I always had pink slime that would grow on the shower curtain liners. Just sayin'.

Liked by Dee

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@windwalker

@danielad I used to live in Richmond, Va. and Tappahannock area. I always had pink slime that would grow on the shower curtain liners. Just sayin'.

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@colleenyoung @adair @sounder27 @windwalker

Hi all, I have lived in various US states and in Europe (military). I don't remember if I saw this pinkish stuff in Europe (too long ago!! But I can testify to the fact that I have encountered it everywhere else I have ever lived. This includes different parts of Texas, Maryland, Nebraska, Iowa, Virginia, South Carolina, and Florida.

Guess now we need to know how to get rid of the problem "at the source"! But how do we do that, if, as Dr. Falkinham mentions, the bacteria enters via the municipal/county water? It seems his study, aside from "mapping" where the problems are located in the US and Canada, may also help in providing support to his working theory. If so, I presume we need to wait until "someone" in Federal, State, or County government accepts the study, and decides to do something about it. But what can we do in the mean time?

I would say that if we could place some sort of equipment at the water's point of entry into our houses, it would be a GREAT option! Also, it doesn't have to be a house. The equipment could be placed in an apartment or other dwelling — They all have a "main" point of entry for the water. Let's all do a little research on the topic! What do you say?
–Dee

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@danielad

@colleenyoung @adair @sounder27 @windwalker

Hi all, I have lived in various US states and in Europe (military). I don't remember if I saw this pinkish stuff in Europe (too long ago!! But I can testify to the fact that I have encountered it everywhere else I have ever lived. This includes different parts of Texas, Maryland, Nebraska, Iowa, Virginia, South Carolina, and Florida.

Guess now we need to know how to get rid of the problem "at the source"! But how do we do that, if, as Dr. Falkinham mentions, the bacteria enters via the municipal/county water? It seems his study, aside from "mapping" where the problems are located in the US and Canada, may also help in providing support to his working theory. If so, I presume we need to wait until "someone" in Federal, State, or County government accepts the study, and decides to do something about it. But what can we do in the mean time?

I would say that if we could place some sort of equipment at the water's point of entry into our houses, it would be a GREAT option! Also, it doesn't have to be a house. The equipment could be placed in an apartment or other dwelling — They all have a "main" point of entry for the water. Let's all do a little research on the topic! What do you say?
–Dee

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@colleenyoung @adair @sounder27 @windwalker

Interesting article (2006): https://www.gulfshoresutilities.com/pdf/pink_stain.pdf — According to this article — "Although pink staining is often caused by the bacterium Serratia marcescens, other bacteria may be to blame. …". Makes for an interesting read …

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@danielad

@colleenyoung @adair @sounder27 @windwalker

Hi all, I have lived in various US states and in Europe (military). I don't remember if I saw this pinkish stuff in Europe (too long ago!! But I can testify to the fact that I have encountered it everywhere else I have ever lived. This includes different parts of Texas, Maryland, Nebraska, Iowa, Virginia, South Carolina, and Florida.

Guess now we need to know how to get rid of the problem "at the source"! But how do we do that, if, as Dr. Falkinham mentions, the bacteria enters via the municipal/county water? It seems his study, aside from "mapping" where the problems are located in the US and Canada, may also help in providing support to his working theory. If so, I presume we need to wait until "someone" in Federal, State, or County government accepts the study, and decides to do something about it. But what can we do in the mean time?

I would say that if we could place some sort of equipment at the water's point of entry into our houses, it would be a GREAT option! Also, it doesn't have to be a house. The equipment could be placed in an apartment or other dwelling — They all have a "main" point of entry for the water. Let's all do a little research on the topic! What do you say?
–Dee

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@migizii I can say that I live in Northern Minnesota and drink well water at my home and have never seen this “pink slime” many of you describe on your shower curtains. I shave seen dark yellowish colors on the bottom of our shower curtains, but my husband attributes that to the iron content in the well water (he’s a soil scientist). So, as far as the research, this perhaps can be one place in the USA that does not generally have this pink slime.

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@windwalker Hi Teri, We live in Fresno, CA, and we have an orange residue in our sinks, our refrigerator ice dispenser tray (outside the fridge).

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