Pacemaker recipients.

Posted by balubeje @balubeje, May 25, 2016

I am coming on a year post op having a pacemaker placement for bradycardia. I would be interested in a support group with the same concerns. I think a support network would be so beneficial.

Liked by Solo Act

@balubeje

Ms, Nancy-in my opinion-you should check with your health care provider about the shingles vaccine. As this is your second rodeo and much worse than the first you definitely don’t need another trip down that path. I am not sure if there might be health concerns that would prevent you from receiving the vaccine. I was told to wait 6 months post shingles but I waited a year. I was taking four different prescribed items and one was found not to be effective for me so I was changed to a different one and within 24 hours there was a huge improvement. I was home from work for a week with little to no activity. I’ve never known clothes to be painful except for a sunburn or if I’m trying to cram more into them than permitted. Once I could tolerate clothes I went back to work. I know of a pathologist who suffered for months as far out as 9 of them and well the rest isn’t important. Food for thought.

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I will check with the primary doc in November. That is a great idea, I’ve already been told I can’t have a flu shot for a month. I just know I’m really tired. I have a lady friend who came over this morning who stayed with me while I showered. She took the clothes out of er and folded & put two loads out the dryer. She even put them away. Of course this was planned and I even had her check made out. This helps both of us as we both have kneads. Thanks for the idea! Nancy

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@colleenyoung

What a great idea @balubeje. A group for people who have pacemakers. I’m tagging fellow Connect members who have mentioned that they have pacemakers. Please meet @ronbee @jimana @martishka @billmichalski @sotiredofit @ricke62 @catygirl @bevtar98.

@balubeje why don’t you kick off the conversation. What is your primary concern? How has living with a pacemaker changed how you live today?

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Thank you for this discussion group. I received a pacemaker last wk. A total surprise for me . As well as being put on Lisinopril for high blood pressure. Prior to that I was trying to control my blood pressure through natural remedies, herbs and vitamins to no avail. After several near fainting and fainting episodes I ended up with a concussion and in the hospital . Since Jan of this yr. 2016 I have lost 72 lbs . and am no longer in the pre diabetic class. Yeah! I did this through a study group focusing on exercise and low fat diet. I am anxious to get back to my exercise programs of zumba, aqua zumba, the gym, and 5K’s. The last 5K that I ran was the day before I collapsed and came in 6th of 19 in my age group(65-70) I would like to resume all these activities . Are any of you involved in this type of exercise and if so how did you feel when you went back to working out? Thanks in advance for any advice you can give me …

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@colleenyoung

What a great idea @balubeje. A group for people who have pacemakers. I’m tagging fellow Connect members who have mentioned that they have pacemakers. Please meet @ronbee @jimana @martishka @billmichalski @sotiredofit @ricke62 @catygirl @bevtar98.

@balubeje why don’t you kick off the conversation. What is your primary concern? How has living with a pacemaker changed how you live today?

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Nope. You put me to shame. I would think by Spring all restrictions currently placed on you would be lifted (pacemaker ones) and would be an excellent time to get back into your routine. Just remember to follow your PCP’s orders. With your blood pressure concerns you might have to adjust and plan accordingly. Keep us posted.

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Good Morning! I posted a while back about my husband’s saga with infection/rejection of his two pacemakers since June 2015. Well now he is on pacemaker number 3 and is rejecting in just after two short months. His EP has referred him to Kansas City where there is a surgeon who implants the tiny lead-less pacemakers directly into the heart. Has anyone that has had complications gotten one of these and how has it worked for you? thanks in advance.

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I had a av node abilation with a doublelead pacemaker on Jan.3, 2017, I was in permanent a-fib and very symthomatic. Anyone else have this problem?

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Hi @bonniecanby,

There are a few Connect members who may be able to provide some insight; please meet @martishka, @guardian, @bevmaier, @gonefishinmt.
Bonnie, could you give us a few more details? Do you have afib, even after the ablation was done?

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@kanaazpereira

Hi @bonniecanby,

There are a few Connect members who may be able to provide some insight; please meet @martishka, @guardian, @bevmaier, @gonefishinmt.
Bonnie, could you give us a few more details? Do you have afib, even after the ablation was done?

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I do not have a-fib since my ablation. I was told they did the ablation on the AV node (where the heart normally receives the impulse to beat) so I am now pacemaker dependent. Without it, I do not have a heartbeat.

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The PM is giving me a steady heart beat however they tell me here at mayo that the artrial parrt of my heart is still in a-fib.

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@kanaazpereira

Hi @bonniecanby,

There are a few Connect members who may be able to provide some insight; please meet @martishka, @guardian, @bevmaier, @gonefishinmt.
Bonnie, could you give us a few more details? Do you have afib, even after the ablation was done?

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I had the abilation dThey told me that the atrial’s were still in a-fib vut the PM was keeping the ventrials beating at 70-80 bpm and regular,

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Wish I could be helpful for you. I am coming on two years with a PM in June-bradycardia. At my last visit with the cardiac nurse in Jan. 2017 she could tell that I had two bouts of Afib several months apart and of course I couldn’t remember any correlation so we are treating with baby aspirin daily. Fatigue comes and goes but I am keeping a closer eye on the lightheadedness. That drives me crazy.

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@kanaazpereira

Hi @bonniecanby,

There are a few Connect members who may be able to provide some insight; please meet @martishka, @guardian, @bevmaier, @gonefishinmt.
Bonnie, could you give us a few more details? Do you have afib, even after the ablation was done?

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It’s good to hear from you, @bevmaier, and really appreciate your input. I noticed from your past messages that you had some concerns about the recurrence of rheumatic fever; we’d love to know how you are doing now?

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No sure if I read this correctly but I haven’t had rheumatic
fever.

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@kanaazpereira

Hi @bonniecanby,

There are a few Connect members who may be able to provide some insight; please meet @martishka, @guardian, @bevmaier, @gonefishinmt.
Bonnie, could you give us a few more details? Do you have afib, even after the ablation was done?

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—- Mayo Clinic Connect wrote:
Hi,
I’m doing great from the rheumatic fever. I had that when I was only 9 yrs. old and now am 74. So during my teen years and early 20’s I continued to improve yet there was much scar tissue left on my heart. By the time I really needed it, technology had caught up to my situation and I was able to get my mitral valve replaced (with a metal valve) and that covered things for a while. then a few yrs. later, I started into a-fib which remained an ongoing problem until I had the ablation and pacemaker about 3 yrs. ago. The medication usually used for a-fib – well I think I had gone thru all of them many time over. They would last about 2 months, then just quit working, so on to the next one. It got to the point we were going back and trying some of the first ones I ever used. But, in the end, nothing would bring the heart rate down, so we opted for this last procedure. I am, for the most part, pleased with this, but the quality of life is not the same. I am pretty limited in how far I can walk,etc. Otherwise, all is well and I guess this saved my little life. How are things with you and what’s your story of where this all began for you.
Beverly

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@balubeje

Wish I could be helpful for you. I am coming on two years with a PM in June-bradycardia. At my last visit with the cardiac nurse in Jan. 2017 she could tell that I had two bouts of Afib several months apart and of course I couldn’t remember any correlation so we are treating with baby aspirin daily. Fatigue comes and goes but I am keeping a closer eye on the lightheadedness. That drives me crazy.

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—- Mayo Clinic Connect wrote:
Hi,
I’ve only had one very short lived episode of A-fib since the PM. Since my PM creates every heartbeat I have, quite naturally my first battery will not last as long as someone’s who only kicking in now and the. But, worse things have happened than needing a replacement PM. I’ll cross that bridge when I get to it. What is your current situation and I hope you are doing well.
Beverly

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@kanaazpereira

Hi @bonniecanby,

There are a few Connect members who may be able to provide some insight; please meet @martishka, @guardian, @bevmaier, @gonefishinmt.
Bonnie, could you give us a few more details? Do you have afib, even after the ablation was done?

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My story…probably started 30 years ago more or less. By happenstance I was found to have junctional node rhythm. Saw a very reputable cardiologist at KUMC in KC who put me through a battery of tests and then on a medication used for asthmatics which made my heart race and was a quick way to lose weight-5 pounds in a week but I just couldn’t function. Everything inside was as if someone had their foot on the gas pedal and I couldn’t slow down so my medication was cut in half and that was not helpful so the cardiologist thought I would be fine and not to be concerned so I moved on with my life. Fast forward to early 2015 I went to my primary care provider with the compliant that I felt like the blood flow to my head wasn’t going all the way up-crazy I know but that’s how it felt-unbeknownst to me it was lightheadedness I was experiencing. So they found that I had a very low heart rate which is common in marathon runners which I am not or heart so I went through a battery of tests from an echocardiogram to a stress test that flipped out the technologist to a month long cardiac monitor which indicated I had 6 second pauses in my heart beats. During that stent I firmly believe that God intervened twice or I might not be here today. In June 2015 the pacemaker was inserted and life has been an adjustment. As a side note in December 2014 I had a calcium cardiac test which didn’t detect any plaque and in 2015 prior to the PM placement I had a CT vein mapping that showed I have a strong heart just no rhythm. I try to keep a sense of humor and if I need a nap and I can’t power through I take one. In April i will turn 63. I take metoprolol 25mg that I cut in half and take twice a day. I’m noticing some changes that I haven’t addressed yet as I am trying to rule out if they are stress related. Life sometimes gets in the way and it has recently settled down. I believe I am in a win-win situation. Each day I wake up and I am here I am very thankful and if that changes and I have a heavenly address I will have reach my final destination.

Lou

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