Organ Donation and Transplant: What is Your story?

Posted by Rosemary, Volunteer Mentor @rosemarya, Oct 26, 2020

Every transplant patient has a unique story to tell. Let's create this place to share our stories. By sharing, we can meet others like us, we can encourage people who are at the beginning of their journey, and we can support those who are on the waiting list.

Here are some questions for you to consider as you write your story:
– Focus on yourself and how you felt, what you did, who helped you.
– How did you find out that you would need an organ transplant?
– What was the waiting and recovery like for you?
– How has your life changed since your transplant?

Organ donation and transplant is a very personal. To respect the privacy of all be sure to have permission before sharing identifying details about others involved in your story, for example
– your donor/recipient (age, circumstances of death, etc)
– your caregiver or family members (say "my husband", rather than using a full name)

What is your transplant story?

Note: If you want to ask a question for another member who has posted their transplant story here in this discussion, be sure to add their @membername in your post, for example @rosemarya. Your question may already be discussed in other transplant discussions. Be sure to check here first: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/transplants/ That way this discussion can be reserved for member transplant stories and hopefully make it easier to read and find similar symptoms to your own.

@jillmartinez55

Thank you so much for sharing. I am in the testing process to be a living donor for my mom. I fly to Arizona mid November to complete my testing process and if all goes well then I will be having surgery in January.

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@jillmartinez55, Welcome to Mayo Connect. I hope that your tests are going smoothly for you as you proceed toward donating a kidney to your mother.
Have you read @cmael's story at the beginning of this discussion? Her daughter was her living donor, you will see it if you scroll to the 1st page of this discussion.

Here is a discussion I want to share with you. "Kidney transplant – The Journey from the Donor's Side." If you click on the link you will be taken directly to the discussion and you will meet @mauraacro, who shares her kidney donation experience and details from the testing thru the actual donation to the present. It is a long/popular discussion! If you start at the beginning, you can follow her and other donors. You will be both educated and inspired. And I urge you to ask your questions to these living donor "experts" and to know that you are one of our transplant heroes!
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/kidney-transplant-from-the-donor-side/
I will be looking for you there, and I am always available if you have questions or get lost on Connect.

And, before I forget – Please come back to this discussion and share your transplant story in 2021!

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My transplant journey began on Christmas Eve, 2013. My son and daughter were home for the holidays and we were having a nice Christmas Eve dinner. I was acting strangely and my husband was immediately concerned and called the EMTs. They checked everything out, my husband and daughter thought I might be having a stroke, but nothing showed up that they could test for so I was brought to the ER. I underwent numerous tests but it was determined that I was overtired, dehydrated, and a couple of other things and advised to see my PCP for follow-up.

I went to my PCP but nothing was determined. I had more of these episodes of confusion, some were more serious than others. The PCP that I had at the time called me one afternoon and told me that she thought I had Alzheimer’s! Two other doctors literally guffawed at that, and also were surprised that a doctor would call a patient on the phone to give them what is such terrible news. I began my search for another PCP. She was a family practitioner and I was told by a couple of other doctors that I should consider a doctor of internal medicine, they are generally better diagnosticians, although there are some family doctors who are better at that than others.

I found another doctor who was highly recommended but he was also mystified. He sent me to a neurologist thinking my problem was neurological. The neurologist checked me out and his first guess was that it was a post-migraine syndrome since I had severe migraines prior to menopause. He also thought it could some type of seizure and put me on a drug for that. That did not help. I continued to have HE episodes, some of which caused hospital stays of a few days. I had low platelets so I was seeing a hematologist for that and he could not determine the reason for my declining platelet count, called it “ITP” which basically means they don’t know.

At that point, during a hospital admission, the neurologist suggested that it might be my liver. I also had hand tremors, terrible leg cramps, particularly in my thighs, I was always cold, had severe edema a number of times, along with the HE episodes. (HE is short for Hepatic Encephalopathy which is caused by ammonia going to the brain. It causes a great deal of confusion and sometimes delirium. If not treated it can put a person into a coma and even cause death.) They tested me for high ammonia and sure enough, it was high. This all took place over about 15 months – it was March of 2015 when that was finally recognized. I was sent for a CT scan to confirm cirrhosis and sure enough, that was the problem. It was April when I got the diagnosis. My PCP told me I needed to see a hepatologist and suggested a particular hospital. We went there and did not care for it so I did my own research and chose Mass General. It was June when I got to see the hepatologist there. She told me that I probably had cirrhosis for 10 years, it takes a long time for symptoms to be so pronounced that it is recognized. When I looked back I realized that must be true because my platelets had been declining for a number of years, I was diagnosed with diabetes in that time frame, and my hands had been shaking for years. That was originally diagnosed as “essential tremor”.

They started the evaluation for a liver transplant and I was put on the list sometime during the summer with a MELD of 18. Being in region 1 transplants generally took place when the patient’s MELD was in the 30s so I knew I would have a long wait. Also, when my cirrhosis was first diagnosed I was put on lactulose but the hepatologist put me on xifaxan and I was able to drop lactulose for almost a year and had no HE episodes. When I did have an HE episode again I had to resume taking lactulose along with xifaxan.

During most of this time I was able to lead my normal life, doing all of the things I had always done. Even after I was on both lactulose and xifaxan though I did have HE episodes so I had to be careful. For me, my episodes were almost always preceded by a bad stomach ache. If I had any degree of stomach discomfort and I was out I would immediately head home, just in case. Most often nothing did happen, but it was better to not take risks.

In August of 2016 I started retaining fluid. A week before this I was at my PCP and he commented on how well I looked and said if he didn’t know he would think I was perfectly healthy. Over the next month though I gained about 35 pounds of fluid and there was fluid leaking out of my feet and ankles. Thinking this was going to be life until November I was a bit discouraged but miraculously for me, I got the call on September 22! My transplant occurred on September 23, 2016. It was a 7.5 hour surgery and I discovered afterward that there were 3 transplant surgeons in the surgical room.

I was in the hospital for 6 days during which I had some pain, initially fairly severe, but by the time I went home it was pretty much gone. On my first post-transplant visit, a week later, I was doing so well that I amazed the transplant team. Other than the swollen belly which took a while to go down, I looked as good as I would normally look. I was back to doing everything within a couple of months. My only restriction was to not lift anything heavy, a gallon of water was how they defined that. I have never had a problem with my liver since then, just some relatively minor problems from my immunotherapy.

Some people wonder if they should go ahead with having a transplant, which is something I pondered also, but I am so glad that I did. The last four years have been good ones, including this time of isolation due to COVID. My daughter and son both have gotten married and I was able to be there for that, and to dance with my son at his wedding. Due to our ages and my immunotherapy we are isolating heavily, getting everything delivered, but we get to Zoom with our son and daughter and talk to them on the phone frequently and are looking forward to being able to be with them again. Neither of them lives close to us.

I have no regrets and do not feel any guilt about my donor, I had nothing to do with her death, which was tragic. I feel a great deal of grief for her family though and think of her every day.

To all of you who are awaiting a transplant, I wish you good fortune in getting one without too long a wait, and that all is as successful as mine was.
JK

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We are dealing with a very recent transplant – our family member just had a heart/lung transplant at Mayo. I'm the patient's ex-wife, which may sound strange that I'm closely involved, but we are a tight extended family and I think of him as my brother. Due to Covid he's only allowed one visitor, and that has been our adult son. So we're doing what we can to support my son as he supports his dad.

We are just starting this very long journey of healing, and understand there are a lot of ups and downs about to be faced. I offered to my son to reach out and find us some support groups and gather information to share with him and his siblings. My coping mechanism is to gather information and learn all I can.

We'd appreciate any insights, wisdom, tips or whatever people would be willing to share with us. We will also be looking for support groups to join for my ex, and for us family members.

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@bcrandall

We are dealing with a very recent transplant – our family member just had a heart/lung transplant at Mayo. I'm the patient's ex-wife, which may sound strange that I'm closely involved, but we are a tight extended family and I think of him as my brother. Due to Covid he's only allowed one visitor, and that has been our adult son. So we're doing what we can to support my son as he supports his dad.

We are just starting this very long journey of healing, and understand there are a lot of ups and downs about to be faced. I offered to my son to reach out and find us some support groups and gather information to share with him and his siblings. My coping mechanism is to gather information and learn all I can.

We'd appreciate any insights, wisdom, tips or whatever people would be willing to share with us. We will also be looking for support groups to join for my ex, and for us family members.

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@bcrandall Welcome to Mayo Connect! My husband is a kidney transplant recipient, now 4 years out. Each transplant patient and their support team is a unique story, a unique journey. It's wonderful that you are all working together to make this time as meaningful and smooth as you can! Was the surgery at a Mayo Clinic campus, or somewhere else? Either way, congratulations!

Here are a few links to existing discussions within the transplant group conversations:
Dealing with tips and suggestions is https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/transplant-caregiver-advice-got-tips-to-share/
Lung transplant thoughts here https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/lung-transplant-post-op-would-like-to-hear-positive-stories/
Post transplant thoughts here https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/changes-after-transplant/?commentsorderby=ASC#chv4-comment-stream-header

@danab is a fairly recent heart transplant patient, and possibly offer you thoughts. Also, check with your ex-husband's transplant team, to source out local support groups who may have some ideas. I think you might hear "everything in it's time", "don't forget to take your meds!" often, as we heard ;)) It's true!

I look forward to hearing from you.
Ginger

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@bcrandall

We are dealing with a very recent transplant – our family member just had a heart/lung transplant at Mayo. I'm the patient's ex-wife, which may sound strange that I'm closely involved, but we are a tight extended family and I think of him as my brother. Due to Covid he's only allowed one visitor, and that has been our adult son. So we're doing what we can to support my son as he supports his dad.

We are just starting this very long journey of healing, and understand there are a lot of ups and downs about to be faced. I offered to my son to reach out and find us some support groups and gather information to share with him and his siblings. My coping mechanism is to gather information and learn all I can.

We'd appreciate any insights, wisdom, tips or whatever people would be willing to share with us. We will also be looking for support groups to join for my ex, and for us family members.

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@bcrandall Hi and Congratulations on your ex-husband's new Heart and Lung. Exciting times and I didn't see this post before my answer in the other message but either way is fine. If you haven't seen it yet at the beginning of this thread is my transplant story. I welcome expanding on any.portion of the process going forward. Please share any concerns you may have and if i cant answer them there are others here also. As for a support group this is a great one and i highly.recomend the patient portal. Nurse Coordinators are a great resource also. They can also direct you to others in the Mayo departments like the social workers to get questions about his direct care. I also would suggest that your Son and ex husband also join here at connect, there are caregivers also here that are a great resource. We look forward to hearing more as the process unfolds.
Have a Blessed Day
Dana

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@danab

@bcrandall Hi and Congratulations on your ex-husband's new Heart and Lung. Exciting times and I didn't see this post before my answer in the other message but either way is fine. If you haven't seen it yet at the beginning of this thread is my transplant story. I welcome expanding on any.portion of the process going forward. Please share any concerns you may have and if i cant answer them there are others here also. As for a support group this is a great one and i highly.recomend the patient portal. Nurse Coordinators are a great resource also. They can also direct you to others in the Mayo departments like the social workers to get questions about his direct care. I also would suggest that your Son and ex husband also join here at connect, there are caregivers also here that are a great resource. We look forward to hearing more as the process unfolds.
Have a Blessed Day
Dana

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Thank you very much for your quick response. I'm having my son, daughter and step-son all join this forum also so they can get more information.

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My Caregiver Journey
Each transplant story has similarities, but stands alone. Likewise, caregivers’ stories are unique. My journey is not different.

My husband and I met in early 2015, while attending a kidney disease support group. He had been on peritoneal dialysis since October 2011 [having been listed for transplant six months earlier], and I had recently been diagnosed with a very rare disease. I was struck by Bill’s positive attitude, and marveled at his stories of camping and road trips while on dialysis, even rigging up deep cycle batteries to power his machine so he could continue off-road adventures and charitable activities. We became comfortable talking to each other, and even though we lived almost 100 miles apart, he asked me to part of his caregiver team. By then it was a no-brainer for me, and our relationship continued to grow.

Towards the end of 2012, he had decided to double-list, being listed at his local transplant center, and then listed also at Scripps Institute in La Jolla, CA [about 90 miles south]. He continued to work full-time, and in fact never missed any work-time until time of the transplant. In August 2016, he suffered a bout of diverticulitis, and had to go on antibiotics when his access port became septic. During that 2 week period, he was called for a transplant, but had to pass it up. We went camping the following weekend, and had planned to go out again 2 weeks later.

When the transplant team called from Scripps on Thurs September 29, 2016, they advised he was third in line for a kidney. He went in to work the next day, and straightened up his area, leaving detailed notes for people “just in case”. We were to go camping, but decided he should stay close to home. We were both pretty nervous, and excited. Saturday morning, as he ate breakfast with a friend, the transplant team called and told him to stand-by, he was still #3, and go NPO [no food]. I wanted to start the drive down to him, but he wanted me to wait. At 6:30PM, as we were talking on the phone, the transplant team called and instructed him to head in, but it wasn’t a sure thing, yet. They would not wait for me to drive the 100 miles to him, then head another 90 miles south. So, he drove himself, called his daughter to meet him there, called his boss, and called his son. Since the surgery still wasn’t sure, as he was #3, he asked me to wait.

The first candidate was not able to be transplanted that night. That moved Bill up to #2, and both the second candidate and he got a new kidney that night, Saturday October 1, 2016. I drove down the next day; he was released on Tues. At that time, I had retired from full-time work due to my kidney disease. My part-time job was flexible, and my boss was very gracious. Bill’s daughter and I were co-caregivers, splitting the week up so she was there 3 days, I was there 4 days. I accompanied him to all appointments, taking copious notes, and asking lots of questions. We learned a lot about each other, and feel the time spent thrown together in recovery gave us a solid foundation for our relationship.

Tips I would give to other caregivers:
1. Accompany your patient to all appointment, pre- and post-transplant. Write down questions ahead of time. Don’t feel shy to ask them, and take notes. Ask for clarification on anything if you need to. Write down the patient’s vitals each appointment, and in between. Your patient may not hear all that is being said, or may miss something as they ponder a point.
2. If you are in a city you’re not used to, make friends with your new neighbors. You’ll need to lean on them in unexpected ways. We met a young couple living a floor above us, turned out she was a nurse, so if there was a problem, she was right there! Understand how to get to appointments, and have multiple routes figured out. Program important phone numbers and contacts into your phone.
3. It’s okay to remind your patient to take their meds, to get out and walk, to watch their diet. It’s a new way of life, and easy to forget, let alone be overwhelming. Even now, when I hear the alarm go off at 8am and 8pm, I make sure Bill has his meds. When we went camping 6 weeks after transplant, we timed it with an appointment. After the dr visit, that night he realized he had not brought his meds along, so we drove h***-bent back home, trailer in tow. I had to push him to go walking at first, even if it was just around the parking lot. Now he averages 10,000+ steps a day.
4. Be grateful for the process. It can be scary, yes. While you are dealing with this gift of a second chance, another family may be grieving a great loss in theirs. It’s okay to feel conflicting emotions. If need be, reach out to the transplant social worker, or to us here on Mayo Connect. You are not meant to bear this undertaking alone.
5. Your patient has a new-to-them organ. There may be personality changes. Be patient. Remember to take care of yourself, too.
Ginger

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@gingerw

My Caregiver Journey
Each transplant story has similarities, but stands alone. Likewise, caregivers’ stories are unique. My journey is not different.

My husband and I met in early 2015, while attending a kidney disease support group. He had been on peritoneal dialysis since October 2011 [having been listed for transplant six months earlier], and I had recently been diagnosed with a very rare disease. I was struck by Bill’s positive attitude, and marveled at his stories of camping and road trips while on dialysis, even rigging up deep cycle batteries to power his machine so he could continue off-road adventures and charitable activities. We became comfortable talking to each other, and even though we lived almost 100 miles apart, he asked me to part of his caregiver team. By then it was a no-brainer for me, and our relationship continued to grow.

Towards the end of 2012, he had decided to double-list, being listed at his local transplant center, and then listed also at Scripps Institute in La Jolla, CA [about 90 miles south]. He continued to work full-time, and in fact never missed any work-time until time of the transplant. In August 2016, he suffered a bout of diverticulitis, and had to go on antibiotics when his access port became septic. During that 2 week period, he was called for a transplant, but had to pass it up. We went camping the following weekend, and had planned to go out again 2 weeks later.

When the transplant team called from Scripps on Thurs September 29, 2016, they advised he was third in line for a kidney. He went in to work the next day, and straightened up his area, leaving detailed notes for people “just in case”. We were to go camping, but decided he should stay close to home. We were both pretty nervous, and excited. Saturday morning, as he ate breakfast with a friend, the transplant team called and told him to stand-by, he was still #3, and go NPO [no food]. I wanted to start the drive down to him, but he wanted me to wait. At 6:30PM, as we were talking on the phone, the transplant team called and instructed him to head in, but it wasn’t a sure thing, yet. They would not wait for me to drive the 100 miles to him, then head another 90 miles south. So, he drove himself, called his daughter to meet him there, called his boss, and called his son. Since the surgery still wasn’t sure, as he was #3, he asked me to wait.

The first candidate was not able to be transplanted that night. That moved Bill up to #2, and both the second candidate and he got a new kidney that night, Saturday October 1, 2016. I drove down the next day; he was released on Tues. At that time, I had retired from full-time work due to my kidney disease. My part-time job was flexible, and my boss was very gracious. Bill’s daughter and I were co-caregivers, splitting the week up so she was there 3 days, I was there 4 days. I accompanied him to all appointments, taking copious notes, and asking lots of questions. We learned a lot about each other, and feel the time spent thrown together in recovery gave us a solid foundation for our relationship.

Tips I would give to other caregivers:
1. Accompany your patient to all appointment, pre- and post-transplant. Write down questions ahead of time. Don’t feel shy to ask them, and take notes. Ask for clarification on anything if you need to. Write down the patient’s vitals each appointment, and in between. Your patient may not hear all that is being said, or may miss something as they ponder a point.
2. If you are in a city you’re not used to, make friends with your new neighbors. You’ll need to lean on them in unexpected ways. We met a young couple living a floor above us, turned out she was a nurse, so if there was a problem, she was right there! Understand how to get to appointments, and have multiple routes figured out. Program important phone numbers and contacts into your phone.
3. It’s okay to remind your patient to take their meds, to get out and walk, to watch their diet. It’s a new way of life, and easy to forget, let alone be overwhelming. Even now, when I hear the alarm go off at 8am and 8pm, I make sure Bill has his meds. When we went camping 6 weeks after transplant, we timed it with an appointment. After the dr visit, that night he realized he had not brought his meds along, so we drove h***-bent back home, trailer in tow. I had to push him to go walking at first, even if it was just around the parking lot. Now he averages 10,000+ steps a day.
4. Be grateful for the process. It can be scary, yes. While you are dealing with this gift of a second chance, another family may be grieving a great loss in theirs. It’s okay to feel conflicting emotions. If need be, reach out to the transplant social worker, or to us here on Mayo Connect. You are not meant to bear this undertaking alone.
5. Your patient has a new-to-them organ. There may be personality changes. Be patient. Remember to take care of yourself, too.
Ginger

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@gingerw It's so nice to hear yours and your husband's story. He was transplanted a week after me, I was on 09.23.2016. I'm happy that his transplant worked out as well as mine did. You have some great advice for others going through this too.

I too forgot my medications one time, we were on our way, only about an hour and a half from home, thankfully, so that had made me extremely conscious of them now whenever we go away. I doubt I will ever forget them again and I suspect your husband will not either.
JK

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@contentandwell

@gingerw It's so nice to hear yours and your husband's story. He was transplanted a week after me, I was on 09.23.2016. I'm happy that his transplant worked out as well as mine did. You have some great advice for others going through this too.

I too forgot my medications one time, we were on our way, only about an hour and a half from home, thankfully, so that had made me extremely conscious of them now whenever we go away. I doubt I will ever forget them again and I suspect your husband will not either.
JK

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@contentandwell Thank you!
It has pretty much become second nature for me to ask if he has his meds along. We keep two doses [one morning, one evening] in my car center console "just in case", and change them out every few months. Likewise, I keep doses of my meds in his truck. Especially as we come in to winter, if we were to get delayed somewhere, we might not have clean underwear, but we will have meds!
Ginger

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@gingerw

@contentandwell Thank you!
It has pretty much become second nature for me to ask if he has his meds along. We keep two doses [one morning, one evening] in my car center console "just in case", and change them out every few months. Likewise, I keep doses of my meds in his truck. Especially as we come in to winter, if we were to get delayed somewhere, we might not have clean underwear, but we will have meds!
Ginger

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@gingerw I had to change from tacrolimus to sirolimus and the good thing is that you only have to take sirolimus once a day. I get up, take it, and then wait an hour before eating — I prefer to take without food so I can a smaller dosage. When I went from taking it with food to without my dose dropped from 4mg to 2.5mg. The other benefit of taking without food is that if the timing of taking it is not convenient with when dining, as when eating out or something, I no longer have to deal with that.
JK

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My double lung transplant/ October 6, 2019:
My journey started in 2013 when I began to have shortness of breath. I had a cardiac catheterization in 2015 but the doctors didn't recognize at that time that my Pulmonary pressure was too high. In 2018 I became very Ill at my daughter's when we went to see the Atlanta gardens. It was hot and there were inclines and I collapsed. Another cardiac catheterization later and I was diagnosed with Pulmonary hypertension. I was put on medicine after medicine but nothing brought my pressures down, in fact they became sky high at 130-150. The PAH meds were wicked awful with side effects that had me vomiting throughout the day. I was short of breath, fainting and had severe heart failure. Fast forward to 2019 and I began my eval for double Lung transplant. I never really believed I was dying. I kept working at my private psychotherapy practice. I thought no one knew I was sick, turns out everyone knew! I just didn’t identify as a sick person. One day I came home from work and collapsed completely. I was in ICU for acute heart and respiratory failure. I couldn't see people but could hear. A sheer white curtain seemed to be in front of me. They said I could die any minute. They put Me on the list on Friday and Sunday morning said I had a pair of lungs! I would say the surgery and recovery took a heavy toll on my adult kids. It's been rocky with the episodes of pneumonias and rejections as well as CMV. I had a fundoplication which was hard to recover from. I lost forty pounds. And I have a Mycobacterial infection requiring two daily IV infusions as well as other antibiotics. My kidneys are failing. I don’t want to be negative because there is this: every day, I’m alive. Without the transplant I couldn’t call my kids or hug my husband. I couldn’t hear the rain or see the sky or smell the ocean. One more year with my grand baby. It’s all priceless. Every day is a gift! Don’t waste it. Take a nice big bite of every moment you are given because you don’t get another one just like this. I consider myself very lucky and grateful, especially to my wonderful donor. Rock on!

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@rockorobin

My double lung transplant/ October 6, 2019:
My journey started in 2013 when I began to have shortness of breath. I had a cardiac catheterization in 2015 but the doctors didn't recognize at that time that my Pulmonary pressure was too high. In 2018 I became very Ill at my daughter's when we went to see the Atlanta gardens. It was hot and there were inclines and I collapsed. Another cardiac catheterization later and I was diagnosed with Pulmonary hypertension. I was put on medicine after medicine but nothing brought my pressures down, in fact they became sky high at 130-150. The PAH meds were wicked awful with side effects that had me vomiting throughout the day. I was short of breath, fainting and had severe heart failure. Fast forward to 2019 and I began my eval for double Lung transplant. I never really believed I was dying. I kept working at my private psychotherapy practice. I thought no one knew I was sick, turns out everyone knew! I just didn’t identify as a sick person. One day I came home from work and collapsed completely. I was in ICU for acute heart and respiratory failure. I couldn't see people but could hear. A sheer white curtain seemed to be in front of me. They said I could die any minute. They put Me on the list on Friday and Sunday morning said I had a pair of lungs! I would say the surgery and recovery took a heavy toll on my adult kids. It's been rocky with the episodes of pneumonias and rejections as well as CMV. I had a fundoplication which was hard to recover from. I lost forty pounds. And I have a Mycobacterial infection requiring two daily IV infusions as well as other antibiotics. My kidneys are failing. I don’t want to be negative because there is this: every day, I’m alive. Without the transplant I couldn’t call my kids or hug my husband. I couldn’t hear the rain or see the sky or smell the ocean. One more year with my grand baby. It’s all priceless. Every day is a gift! Don’t waste it. Take a nice big bite of every moment you are given because you don’t get another one just like this. I consider myself very lucky and grateful, especially to my wonderful donor. Rock on!

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@rockorobin, Welcome to the Mayo Connect Transplant Discussion Group and thank you for sharing your transplant story. Your struggles and your message of hope are a priceless gift to anyone who is in the midst of their own transplant journey. We are lucky and grateful that you have shared what it is from the perspective of a double lung transplant recipient.

I invite you to join in the discussion.
Lung Transplant Post-op? would like to hear positive stories
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/lung-transplant-post-op-would-like-to-hear-positive-stories/

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