Nervousness and Worry

Posted by pjss48 @pjss48, Sun, Jan 13 5:50pm

Does anyone have these problems? How do you handle it?

Do not avoid it. Push yourself to face what makes you anxious. You will realize the next time you face it, it won’t be as bad. Essentially, you are proving your anxiety wrong. Instead of avoiding the situation that makes you anxious, use it to your advantage. A little bit of anxiety can actually be channeled into a better performance.

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@farmboy

Hello. I've been having alot of trouble with my and and panic attacks. As strange as this sounds I have trouble with just letting my thoughts flow. It's like I'm scared of my own thoughts after having anxiety and panic attacks. It's like I'm constantly scared of my thoughts. I just can't calm down and just think freely. Does anyone relate to what I'm going through?

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You are certainly not alone. I have all those feelings too and at my wits end on what to do. My doctor has given me pills to take but they really don't help at all. It is that I see all these happy people with familes and they are laughing and smiling and I am unable to do that. I feel lost an afraid and yes very anxious. Patti

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@aston

Do not avoid it. Push yourself to face what makes you anxious. You will realize the next time you face it, it won’t be as bad. Essentially, you are proving your anxiety wrong. Instead of avoiding the situation that makes you anxious, use it to your advantage. A little bit of anxiety can actually be channeled into a better performance.

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@aston I like that concept of "proving your anxiety wrong". What you can do is replace your thinking with another approach of how to think about something in a more positive way. Use creativity as a guide to figure this out, like a detective. When you find the event that colored your thinking, you can re-evaluate it and see it through fresh eyes and from a more experienced perspective, and you might just find that the former thoughts don't make sense anymore… then you've grown and can be grateful for new thinking and understanding. You're right, anxiety can be an inspiration to achieve great things.

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Yes, worry. My parents were worrisome people, but alot was going on in their lives. I also tend to worry. I have to remind myself to give my issues to the divine since they are too much for me. And, worry just doesn't seem to achieve anything.

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@healthytoday

Yes, worry. My parents were worrisome people, but alot was going on in their lives. I also tend to worry. I have to remind myself to give my issues to the divine since they are too much for me. And, worry just doesn't seem to achieve anything.

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@healthytoday – sometimes when I'm actively worrying about something, my husband will kindly and gently ask me, "Does that help?"

I always have to admit, "Well, no, it's really not."

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I like the way you think Lisa. Give the worry up to the Divine. I'm going to take this on. It may help me.

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@psearby17– Good morning. I'm a worrier too. My middle name should be "what if". One way to lessen and gain control is to make a list. Then go back and see which things you can control. Those are the ones that need action. The other ones need to be at the very bottom of your list because you have no control over them, you can't change them. Might be a great idea just to put them away.

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@lisalucier

Hi, @pjss48 – I've had times in my life where nervousness or worry were problems, either because I was in the middle of something stressful, or anticipating something stressful, or that felt overwhelming (e.g., we're preparing our home to sell and move across town, and I've had a couple of nights where my mind was racing and worrying, thinking of a million things we would have to do to get our home "perfect" for the market).

At times when I've experienced nervousness and worry, I've found they were telling me something, like when I was engaged a few years before my current marriage and finally realized after several months my nervousness was telling me something was wrong with proceeding with getting married. Other times, I've found that nervousness and worry were mostly results of my own thought patterns (e.g., I'm feeling worried all day because I'm telling myself repeatedly that I've ruined the hardwood floor by running a humidifier in the room last night, which leaked in a giant puddle, and that it will cost us a couple of thousand dollars to have to refinish the floor and fix it).

When I am worrying about something, often times my husband asks me kindly, "Is that helping?" And, of course, I have to respond, "No, my worrying's not really helping." I was taught some cognitive behavioral therapy techniques a couple years back, and I found them very helpful in a period where worry or nervousness were cropping up — the process of jotting down my repetitive thoughts throughout the day, analyzing them for patterns, and then countering them. I realized that sometimes I can be "killing myself" with my own thought patterns (sort of the "Gee, no wonder I feel lousy – I've been telling myself all day I did a lousy job in giving that speech, or painting that room, or handling that conversation.")

I think that @contentandwell @kdo0827 @pankaj @manno @brit @karen00 @grandmar @hopeful33250 @phughes814 may also have some insights for you on any experiences they may have had with nervousness and worry, and how they have handled it.

@pjss48 – would you share a little more about any particular experience you've had with nervousness and worry?

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My worry got worse after a major panic attack when my husband lost his job. My thinking is negative. I don't sleep well either. And I have IBSD

Liked by healthytoday

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@pjss48

My worry got worse after a major panic attack when my husband lost his job. My thinking is negative. I don't sleep well either. And I have IBSD

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@pjss48 I have been reading a lot about IBS-D recently because I may have it. I am not entirely sure if it's lactose intolerance, IBS-D, or IBD. I have an appointment next week with a gastro's NP but I think I am going to the wrong person. I think they will refer me to a different gastro who specializes in this. Once you have one gastro, you apparently have to go through that doctor to go to another.
What are you doing for your IBS? So far I have eliminated dairy primarily but the reason I think it may be more than lactose intolerance is that even on some days when I have no dairy, I still have D. Imodium helps very slightly, better than nothing. I have read that anxiety can contribute to IBS. Mine began after I started taking immunosuppressants (post liver transplant). It took me a very long time to put 2 and 2 together and discover that dairy was a trigger.
JK

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@pjss48

My worry got worse after a major panic attack when my husband lost his job. My thinking is negative. I don't sleep well either. And I have IBSD

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I like the youtube series Yoga with Adriane. Practice yoga in your home, especially relaxing breathing.

Liked by jasper1967

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@contentandwell

@pjss48 I have been reading a lot about IBS-D recently because I may have it. I am not entirely sure if it's lactose intolerance, IBS-D, or IBD. I have an appointment next week with a gastro's NP but I think I am going to the wrong person. I think they will refer me to a different gastro who specializes in this. Once you have one gastro, you apparently have to go through that doctor to go to another.
What are you doing for your IBS? So far I have eliminated dairy primarily but the reason I think it may be more than lactose intolerance is that even on some days when I have no dairy, I still have D. Imodium helps very slightly, better than nothing. I have read that anxiety can contribute to IBS. Mine began after I started taking immunosuppressants (post liver transplant). It took me a very long time to put 2 and 2 together and discover that dairy was a trigger.
JK

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I take bentyl immodium. Sometimes ibguard. Mine is anxiety related. What I eat is still unsure

Liked by healthytoday

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I have extreme problems with anxiety. Six months ago my husband had a “widowmakers” heart attack which most people do not survive. I was present with him on the floor as someone did cpr on him. I remember screaming his name and then the ambulance crew arrived . His heart was completely blocked. He was put into a coma for three days to preserve his organs and heart. After a week he woke up. I get flashes of the event out of nowhere. I was diagnosed with ptsd. I was told to use thought blocking.

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@anndomico

I have extreme problems with anxiety. Six months ago my husband had a “widowmakers” heart attack which most people do not survive. I was present with him on the floor as someone did cpr on him. I remember screaming his name and then the ambulance crew arrived . His heart was completely blocked. He was put into a coma for three days to preserve his organs and heart. After a week he woke up. I get flashes of the event out of nowhere. I was diagnosed with ptsd. I was told to use thought blocking.

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what is cpr aand ptsd" Hope he is doing better and you are coping a little better. That is something that would give anyone worry and anxiety God Bless Patti

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@brit

what is cpr aand ptsd" Hope he is doing better and you are coping a little better. That is something that would give anyone worry and anxiety God Bless Patti

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@brit Hello Patti:

PTSD refers to "Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition that's triggered by a terrifying event — either experiencing it or witnessing it. Symptoms may include flashbacks, nightmares and severe anxiety, as well as uncontrollable thoughts about the event." (https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/post-traumatic-stress-disorder/symptoms-causes/syc-20355967) and CPR refers to Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) "a lifesaving technique useful in many emergencies, including a heart attack or near drowning, in which someone's breathing or heartbeat has stopped."
https://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-cpr/basics/art-20056600

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@brit

what is cpr aand ptsd" Hope he is doing better and you are coping a little better. That is something that would give anyone worry and anxiety God Bless Patti

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@brit CPR is cardio pulmonary rescuscitation that is done when someone's heart function and breathing stops to save a person. PTSD is post traumatic stress disorder that happens after a frightening event which tends to cause panic attacks. PTSD is hard to live with and disrupts your life when events trigger memories of the very traumatic events that happened in the past. PTSD is treatable. I experienced some of that with extreme fears of having surgery because of fearful similar experiences when I was little. Every time I thought about having spine surgery, I panicked. Some of that was also because of the injury I had in a car accident twenty tears earlier, that caused the spine problem I had that then needed surgery, and that accident was also a traumatic event contributing to the problem..

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