Has anyone tried the HF10 Spinal Cord Stimulation Device?

Posted by patrick17 @patrick17, Nov 21, 2018

Has anyone tried a device called HF10 ? It’s a device which stimulates your spinal cord to help relieve back and leg pain. After a trial period of about a week, if the patient is achieving good results the device is implanted in the person. My pain management doctor has recommended it to me for arm and hand nerve pain. I would like to hear from anyone who has used this device and especially from anyone who has used it for arm and hand pain. Thank you.

Had FH 10 installed Oct this year, great job but implant is right on belt line so causes a little trouble. This is just to suggest patient asks about positioning post trial and pre implant

REPLY

Hello @bobby55 and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect! I understand you are interested in sharing your experience with others considering an implanted device.

Because of that, you will see that I have moved your post to an existing discussion on spinal cord devices to share your feedback with other members considering an implanted device.

Can I ask if you've shared your concern/discomfort with your surgeon and if there is anything you are hoping to have done about it?

REPLY
@amandajro

Hello @bobby55 and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect! I understand you are interested in sharing your experience with others considering an implanted device.

Because of that, you will see that I have moved your post to an existing discussion on spinal cord devices to share your feedback with other members considering an implanted device.

Can I ask if you've shared your concern/discomfort with your surgeon and if there is anything you are hoping to have done about it?

Jump to this post

I have had a follow up appointment and mentioned this issue, but I have no intentions of having it removed or replaced !
I just wanted them and possible to let others who may have this system fitted are aware and can discus to prevent issue for anyone else. Other than that I’m most happy with pain relief from my unit .

Liked by lorirenee1, wisco50

REPLY
@bobby55

Had FH 10 installed Oct this year, great job but implant is right on belt line so causes a little trouble. This is just to suggest patient asks about positioning post trial and pre implant

Jump to this post

I guess I am surprised they did put it there – with your name and the word belt, presumably you are a male – men wear belts often, which makes it even more surprising to me! Someone wasn’t thinking ahead! Hope you have given them loud and clear feedback! I was asked what positions I most often am in at home i.e. I recline on couch with pillows often – what sleeping positions I preferred, which side, etc. It all seemed logical to me, so makes it more surprising that your belt and waist weren’t closely considered. That would indeed be annoying!

Liked by lorirenee1

REPLY
@donaldjames1

I had a trial with stimulator. I have so much hardware in my back they could not get I to the proper location. I would need a other surgery to even git it to fit. It did not help my pain on the trial so I and my doctor thought we should not pursue putting in a permanent one.

Jump to this post

You sound like my twin in male form! I would like to share my stimulator experience.

I also have extensive hardware (C3-C7, T10-L5 fusions, hardware, Harrington rods) and suffering chronic pain since the 80's, plus Failed Back Syndrome. The trial for the SCS was agreed upon. I had it put in one morning in 2015 by a very experienced Neurosurgeon. That same evening I felt like I was getting electric shock all of a sudden- couldn't move, as it felt like I was burning from inside out from hands to chest to abdomen. Hubby called the doc's emergency number and he suggested I met him back at the hospital ER. Returned and could not lay flat for CT, screaming in agony. The CT was done on left side only due to that, and it showed that the "puck" part had migrated into the left Harrington rod and had caused a blood clot there. Neurosurgeon removed the SCS and removed the blood clot. If you have hardware on thoracic and/or upper lumbar region I DEFINITELY would not recommend the SCS trial… Horrible, horrible experience.

REPLY
@metalneck

You sound like my twin in male form! I would like to share my stimulator experience.

I also have extensive hardware (C3-C7, T10-L5 fusions, hardware, Harrington rods) and suffering chronic pain since the 80's, plus Failed Back Syndrome. The trial for the SCS was agreed upon. I had it put in one morning in 2015 by a very experienced Neurosurgeon. That same evening I felt like I was getting electric shock all of a sudden- couldn't move, as it felt like I was burning from inside out from hands to chest to abdomen. Hubby called the doc's emergency number and he suggested I met him back at the hospital ER. Returned and could not lay flat for CT, screaming in agony. The CT was done on left side only due to that, and it showed that the "puck" part had migrated into the left Harrington rod and had caused a blood clot there. Neurosurgeon removed the SCS and removed the blood clot. If you have hardware on thoracic and/or upper lumbar region I DEFINITELY would not recommend the SCS trial… Horrible, horrible experience.

Jump to this post

@metalneck Welcome back to Mayo Clinic Connect, a place to give and get support. You have a lot of experience members can benefit from.

@donaldjames1 has had a similar experience to you and you would not recommend the SCS trial.

May I ask if you are also looking for particular information on Connect or looking to connect with members that have similar experience to you.

REPLY
@esperanza22

Anyone had the veriflex superion implant

Jump to this post

I had 2 implanted about 4 months ago it has helped with the back of my legs and slightly help with the spinal stenosis I have but I still have enough pain that I take tramadol and Tylenol

REPLY
@jwhite59

A couple years ago I decided on a scs, Boston scientific. Trial was with one type device, went well but trial was only for a few days. I had the Boston Scientific with paddle leads placed. No relief in the area I had back pain. After many adjustments and a year later, I had the thing removed. It may help some but I’ve heard of more people having it removed, unsatisfied with the lack of pain control expected. Just because it didn’t work out for me doesn’t mean it won’t for you. Personally, I think it’s more about the company making money and the doctor more than willing to place them.

Jump to this post

I had two foot surgeries, 2016 and 2018.and as a result the nerves were damaged and possibly scar tissue. As a result I have chronic pain in the toes of my right foot. I tried all traditional remedies with negative result. I was told by a doctor that perhaps SCS but be helpful. Late last spring I had the 5 day trial of Medtronic made by Boston Scientific.The pain from the implantation of the leads were very painful and may have camoflouged the pain in my toes. I was kind of talked into by the surgeon and the rep that the Medtronic has helped people with chronic foot pain and they in of pressured me to get a permanent put in. I I only got a slight relief from the pain in the toes and I think the device was causing back pain. So, about 7 or 8 weeks later I had it removed. After researching it. I don't think the Medtronic is effective for the feet. I am now talking to a doctor who does the DRG (dorsal root ganglion) made by Abbott. That is suppose to be more effective for the legs and possibly the feet which are controlled by L-5 and S-1. That's were the leads are suppose to be placed. But, the drawback as mentioned by earlier statements. MRI's only for the head and extremities. The generator/battery is supposed to be guarenteed for five years.

Liked by Hank

REPLY
@martyk

I had two foot surgeries, 2016 and 2018.and as a result the nerves were damaged and possibly scar tissue. As a result I have chronic pain in the toes of my right foot. I tried all traditional remedies with negative result. I was told by a doctor that perhaps SCS but be helpful. Late last spring I had the 5 day trial of Medtronic made by Boston Scientific.The pain from the implantation of the leads were very painful and may have camoflouged the pain in my toes. I was kind of talked into by the surgeon and the rep that the Medtronic has helped people with chronic foot pain and they in of pressured me to get a permanent put in. I I only got a slight relief from the pain in the toes and I think the device was causing back pain. So, about 7 or 8 weeks later I had it removed. After researching it. I don't think the Medtronic is effective for the feet. I am now talking to a doctor who does the DRG (dorsal root ganglion) made by Abbott. That is suppose to be more effective for the legs and possibly the feet which are controlled by L-5 and S-1. That's were the leads are suppose to be placed. But, the drawback as mentioned by earlier statements. MRI's only for the head and extremities. The generator/battery is supposed to be guarenteed for five years.

Jump to this post

@martyk
I'd advise caution in proceeding further with the DRG until you read about @lorirenee1 Lori Renee's experience with hers (also from Abbott). She has written extensively about it this past 6 months or so. I believe she got hers back in July and has had poor performance from it. She has new pain now in different areas than she had originally and she believes it is from the DRG. Please do your research (or at least look for Lori's posts) before going ahead.

One more point I'd like to make along these lines, and what I am going to say is my own theory, which might be incorrect. I know that when I research something and read different reviews from people, I tend to find significantly more negative reviews than positive, I think because it is human nature to feel disposed toward writing a review if one is unhappy rather than if they are happy customers. And one may tend to get a view of something that is skewed to the downside because of this. It might be the case that in reality more people are helped by a thing than might be inferred by the preponderance of this more negative-leaning feedback. I guess my point is one should neither go forward full steam ahead or put on the brakes immediately based on reading a few reviews. I know my feeling about having a stimulator implanted (for my wife) is that she should NOT have one done and she feels the same, because it seems like what I have read about them on Connect is about 90% failures. But for someone who is seriously in need of a solution for their intolerable pain, it's best to read EVERYTHING you can get your hands on before deciding. Fortunately for my wife, she is not at a level of desperation that she feels the need of doing that much research, and she is very reticent to have any surgery for implantation of any such stimulator device.

Best, Hank

REPLY
@jesfactsmon

@martyk
I'd advise caution in proceeding further with the DRG until you read about @lorirenee1 Lori Renee's experience with hers (also from Abbott). She has written extensively about it this past 6 months or so. I believe she got hers back in July and has had poor performance from it. She has new pain now in different areas than she had originally and she believes it is from the DRG. Please do your research (or at least look for Lori's posts) before going ahead.

One more point I'd like to make along these lines, and what I am going to say is my own theory, which might be incorrect. I know that when I research something and read different reviews from people, I tend to find significantly more negative reviews than positive, I think because it is human nature to feel disposed toward writing a review if one is unhappy rather than if they are happy customers. And one may tend to get a view of something that is skewed to the downside because of this. It might be the case that in reality more people are helped by a thing than might be inferred by the preponderance of this more negative-leaning feedback. I guess my point is one should neither go forward full steam ahead or put on the brakes immediately based on reading a few reviews. I know my feeling about having a stimulator implanted (for my wife) is that she should NOT have one done and she feels the same, because it seems like what I have read about them on Connect is about 90% failures. But for someone who is seriously in need of a solution for their intolerable pain, it's best to read EVERYTHING you can get your hands on before deciding. Fortunately for my wife, she is not at a level of desperation that she feels the need of doing that much research, and she is very reticent to have any surgery for implantation of any such stimulator device.

Best, Hank

Jump to this post

Thanks Hank. I read an article by a Jason M. Highsmith, M.D. who states that he does over 100 SCS surgeries stated SCS is useful in treating complex regional pain syndrome which is relatively uncommon for of chronic pain.
Patients with CRPS, SCS should be used soon after diagnosis because the success rates plummet if pain persists for more than a year. This is because the pain pathways become rewired in people who have CRPS for more than a year or two years, making it harder to reverse the condition. Marty

Liked by Hank

REPLY
@quark

Hoping this is the correct forum for me. I have had chronic abdominal pain since my cystectomy, and then the following year, 2015, my inguinal hernia repair. Just about everything has been tried on me so far, and barely managing with Vicodin 7.5 tid. My pain mgmt doc has brought up the Stim Wave intervention, and I have tried researching it, but most is from the company itself. Has anyone had this done?, know much about it? Thanx in advance. Quark

Jump to this post

I'm interested in Stimwave SCS too. The battery is not implanted. It's worn out side of your body,.I heard you have to take it off before showering and swimming. Marty

REPLY
@pattivi330

I’ve had a Medtronic SCS since 2011 and it’s been a god send for my leg pain following two back surgeries. You would be first given a trial to see if the device is effective for your pain before a permanent device would be implanted. If it doesn’t help your pain then you’ll know not to proceed with a permanent implant.

Jump to this post

Thank you Patti. I'm glad it worked for you.

REPLY
@quark

Thanx patti, and I had the trial with the Boston one a couple of years ago and didn’t help my abdominal pain. Am trying what they call Stim Wave beginning of April for my pain

Jump to this post

Hi Quark, did you have the Stimwave implanted? If so, how is working for your pain? Marty

REPLY
@sanderosa

my Dr wants me to get a ABBOTT nerve stimulator implanted, and I am so undecided as all actions up till now have failed to help stop the pain, there is one that might last 10 years on low, and must have battery recharged each day with a belt, and the other with 5 year battery that must be replaced in 5 years, I use a tens unit now and it helps a little but they say the wires all the way to the spine is a lot better, I read up on i and they are ok for MRI, has anyone had a ABBOTT ProclaimXR implanted? Please let me know as I must make my decision soon…am 85, had this pain since surgery in 1983, cant be up more than about 12 minutes without terrible pain,, I do need help.

Jump to this post

I'm considering the Abbott Proclaim XR for the chronic pain I have in my toes from two foot surgeries. Has anyone used one and what are your recommendations? Thanks, Marty

REPLY
@elsa

Thanks for your post. I'm currently in the process of deciding between Boston Scientific's Wave Writer and Nevro's HF-10. Unfortunately, the doctor who's doing the trial has not provided much guidance. 🙁 I think I'm going with the HF-10 and your post validates this direction.

Jump to this post

I tried Boston Scientific I believe the wave writer. It only reduced my foot pain by about 10% and caused a little back pain. I had it removed after about 7 to 8 weeks. I'm now researching other companies who manufacture SCS's.

REPLY
Please login or register to post a reply.