Heavy perfume in medical facilities, or anywhere, really

Posted by chicagomichelle @chicagomichelle, Jan 19, 2017

How do we get through to people that this could actually cause great respiratory distress? Even death.

I told a hotel guest the other day, in the kindest way possible, that I was allergic to her and she needed to understand what her chemical scent could do to those with respitory issues. She was headed to Mayo. I imagined the poor patients with even more severe conditions. It was the first time I ever said that to anyone’s face, but felt it needed to be said.

I’ve experienced this a great deal this week, even with clinic staff. To date, I’ve had 0 complaints about MC, but I hope they are listening now and will work to make their buildings perfume free.

@jamienolson

@chicagomichelle, @peggyj4411 and @ladycat, Hello and Thank you for starting this important discussion on a topic that we could all benefit from addressing and discussing.

After I was personally addressed at work by another coworker who was offended (and also has respiratory issues) by a scent that I love to wear. I read our work policy and put some thought into how to address this issue. You see, I use an essential oil that helps me focus (something that I struggle with daily) and believe has benefit to me throughout my work day. After talking with supervision I came to the realization of what kind of burden this was posing on others people as well. I had no idea how it was effecting others in our work group. I was able to do some research and found alternative ways to address my focus issues without any smells…which makes for a happy work group! 🙂

Looking into our dress and decorum work policy, I found it reads as is- “It is unacceptable for employees to smell of cigarette smoke or other strong perfumes or odors while at work. Employees who arrive in the work area with the smell of cigarette smoke or other strong smells on their clothing will be required to change before entering the work area”. This is something that is given to all employees when they start here.

In our Allergy and Pulmonary areas there is verbiage on the patients itinerary that kindly asks for patients and attending family members to please avoid perfume and smells in these areas, which is great.

I also looked into our patient education center thinking this would be a good place to have educational material on those that suffer from respiratory issues and what happens when those patients come into contact with strong perfume smells. I found nothing. I then looked for a courtesy sign or something that states information for patient awareness to no avail. The positive spin…. these are all areas with room for improvement! Thank you for helping Mayo Clinic become an even better place for others.

Do any of you have ideas or thoughts for others reading this post on how to politely approach someone that may have an offensive or threatening perfume on? @chicagomichelle, what was the response you received from the hotel guest?

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And virtual hugs back to you! Thank you Rosemary, for saying such kind things about me when you are struggling with your own problems! I have tried previously to warn some aspirin-popping people who were already complaining about side effects, but to no avail. There may be a genetic link in my aspirin problems, since so many of my relatives on my mom’s side of the family can’t tolerate aspirin. My older sister had bad bleeding also when she was in college, with purpura and bruises too..The doc in the college infirmary told my sister to stop taking aspirin, she did, and thank God escaped the hospital. There are so many chemicals out there–we can’t possibly avoid them all..Poisonous vapors, to us, come floating in with the air. As for drugs, we ususally have a choice if we are lucky. I hope you are doing well, Rosemary, and feel better now that the days are growing longer. Gee, do I dare mention those Spring allergies on the horizon? I am finding more relief from noxious vapors (overly perfumed employees) by sleeping with oxygen and using my nebulizer 3 times a day. I sure was surprised at the relief oxygen provides! Have a great week, and may you breathe slow and easy! Hugs again, Peggy

REPLY
@jamienolson

@chicagomichelle, @peggyj4411 and @ladycat, Hello and Thank you for starting this important discussion on a topic that we could all benefit from addressing and discussing.

After I was personally addressed at work by another coworker who was offended (and also has respiratory issues) by a scent that I love to wear. I read our work policy and put some thought into how to address this issue. You see, I use an essential oil that helps me focus (something that I struggle with daily) and believe has benefit to me throughout my work day. After talking with supervision I came to the realization of what kind of burden this was posing on others people as well. I had no idea how it was effecting others in our work group. I was able to do some research and found alternative ways to address my focus issues without any smells…which makes for a happy work group! 🙂

Looking into our dress and decorum work policy, I found it reads as is- “It is unacceptable for employees to smell of cigarette smoke or other strong perfumes or odors while at work. Employees who arrive in the work area with the smell of cigarette smoke or other strong smells on their clothing will be required to change before entering the work area”. This is something that is given to all employees when they start here.

In our Allergy and Pulmonary areas there is verbiage on the patients itinerary that kindly asks for patients and attending family members to please avoid perfume and smells in these areas, which is great.

I also looked into our patient education center thinking this would be a good place to have educational material on those that suffer from respiratory issues and what happens when those patients come into contact with strong perfume smells. I found nothing. I then looked for a courtesy sign or something that states information for patient awareness to no avail. The positive spin…. these are all areas with room for improvement! Thank you for helping Mayo Clinic become an even better place for others.

Do any of you have ideas or thoughts for others reading this post on how to politely approach someone that may have an offensive or threatening perfume on? @chicagomichelle, what was the response you received from the hotel guest?

Jump to this post

Hi Michelle! Thank you so much for the incredible letter; yes, we have to be crusaders and keep talking till we are blue in the face! Most important, you are you doing with your heart? I am very worried about you! Since I have to cut this reply short for now, yes, there were 2 doctors in the hospital, my internist and hematologist, only said it COULD have been aspirin, then decided that I had a rare virus that attacked my immune system!! I just couldn’t believe it! I guess a rare virus looked better than plain aspirin on the insurance forms! Lord Have Mercy! Get well soon, Michelle!

Liked by ladycat

REPLY
@jamienolson

@chicagomichelle, @peggyj4411 and @ladycat, Hello and Thank you for starting this important discussion on a topic that we could all benefit from addressing and discussing.

After I was personally addressed at work by another coworker who was offended (and also has respiratory issues) by a scent that I love to wear. I read our work policy and put some thought into how to address this issue. You see, I use an essential oil that helps me focus (something that I struggle with daily) and believe has benefit to me throughout my work day. After talking with supervision I came to the realization of what kind of burden this was posing on others people as well. I had no idea how it was effecting others in our work group. I was able to do some research and found alternative ways to address my focus issues without any smells…which makes for a happy work group! 🙂

Looking into our dress and decorum work policy, I found it reads as is- “It is unacceptable for employees to smell of cigarette smoke or other strong perfumes or odors while at work. Employees who arrive in the work area with the smell of cigarette smoke or other strong smells on their clothing will be required to change before entering the work area”. This is something that is given to all employees when they start here.

In our Allergy and Pulmonary areas there is verbiage on the patients itinerary that kindly asks for patients and attending family members to please avoid perfume and smells in these areas, which is great.

I also looked into our patient education center thinking this would be a good place to have educational material on those that suffer from respiratory issues and what happens when those patients come into contact with strong perfume smells. I found nothing. I then looked for a courtesy sign or something that states information for patient awareness to no avail. The positive spin…. these are all areas with room for improvement! Thank you for helping Mayo Clinic become an even better place for others.

Do any of you have ideas or thoughts for others reading this post on how to politely approach someone that may have an offensive or threatening perfume on? @chicagomichelle, what was the response you received from the hotel guest?

Jump to this post

@peggyj4411, so interesting, they are telling me I have a nurovirus, sepsis and pneumonia. When I got to the room Tuesday night, I asked them about the ventricle. They asked what I was talking about and tried to convInce me if I had that, I’d be much sicker! The next morning, I asked a doctor who only became angry at me and screamed at the nurse to print out what was in the computer so I don’t think he’s lying to me! Dude!! I’m not lying to you either!! I don’t give a crap what’s in the computer, I was present for the ultrasound and they very directly told me. By the wee hours of Thursday morning, I was becoming more and more furious, so I found the email for the hospital president and explained this all to him. By Thursday morning, THEY SENT IN A SHRINK!! He seemed to find me very credible, because I am. I did not get angry, even though I was, I just kept repeating the same story, over and over. By Thursday afternoon, the floor supervisor was in here apologizing profusely. The ER FORGOT TO INCLUDE THE ULTRASOUND REPORT!! I lay here for 48 hours knowing I had a collapsed ventricle and no one wanted to believe me, but they finally tracked down the US, so they now had no choice!! I came to a completely different hospital too, though I really wanted to go to St Marys. I just didn’t think I could handle the 6 hour drive and there was no way I could fly. My heart rate was 150+. They were going to release me today and my pharmacy calls. They were about to give me an antibiotic that could potentially kill me! It has very bad side effects and the pharmacist caught that I had a reaction to it in 2005. If all of this doesn’t kill me, nothing will. They did do another untrasound late in the day Thursday and the V had opened up. The ER said it was likely due to dehydration when I came in and should open back up. They didn’t let me go tonight after hearing of the prior issue with the drug they were about to prescribe and they still have me on a IV antibiotic, one they tell me is “mild” yet my ankles still feel broken right now. If I use the use of my legs again, I’ll lose my mind. This is truly a nightmare and I wish so bad I had rolled the dice and went to Mayo.

Liked by ladycat, peggyj4411

REPLY

I go to one of the pools in Sun City West and the perfumed people scent wafts over the water like big raft. And lingers.
I would not impose my perfume in movies or on planes etc.
I was not offended when a friend could not walk near me cause of my perfume. I respected her needs.
When I told someone I was allergic to their perfume they were insulted and I was told I should not have said anything. And this was at volleyball on the beach. She still stunk. But, others thought I should just be quiet.
I can get a headache after being next to someone with the wrong perfume.

I sat next to a friend at a movie and the smell of his cats affected my EYES and headache – I had to move away – he later apologized.

What should we do, speak up of just bear it?

Liked by ladycat, peggyj4411

REPLY
@jamienolson

@chicagomichelle, @peggyj4411 and @ladycat, Hello and Thank you for starting this important discussion on a topic that we could all benefit from addressing and discussing.

After I was personally addressed at work by another coworker who was offended (and also has respiratory issues) by a scent that I love to wear. I read our work policy and put some thought into how to address this issue. You see, I use an essential oil that helps me focus (something that I struggle with daily) and believe has benefit to me throughout my work day. After talking with supervision I came to the realization of what kind of burden this was posing on others people as well. I had no idea how it was effecting others in our work group. I was able to do some research and found alternative ways to address my focus issues without any smells…which makes for a happy work group! 🙂

Looking into our dress and decorum work policy, I found it reads as is- “It is unacceptable for employees to smell of cigarette smoke or other strong perfumes or odors while at work. Employees who arrive in the work area with the smell of cigarette smoke or other strong smells on their clothing will be required to change before entering the work area”. This is something that is given to all employees when they start here.

In our Allergy and Pulmonary areas there is verbiage on the patients itinerary that kindly asks for patients and attending family members to please avoid perfume and smells in these areas, which is great.

I also looked into our patient education center thinking this would be a good place to have educational material on those that suffer from respiratory issues and what happens when those patients come into contact with strong perfume smells. I found nothing. I then looked for a courtesy sign or something that states information for patient awareness to no avail. The positive spin…. these are all areas with room for improvement! Thank you for helping Mayo Clinic become an even better place for others.

Do any of you have ideas or thoughts for others reading this post on how to politely approach someone that may have an offensive or threatening perfume on? @chicagomichelle, what was the response you received from the hotel guest?

Jump to this post

20 years ago, after allergy testing – I was given papers with what brands I Could buy without being allergic. Does Mayo offer this list?

I don’t like being told to avoid certain ingredients – then with every cosmetic and product I buy – I’m supposed to carry around of list of chemicals I’m allergic to. And to put some in a baggie to be tested at Drs. – then go back to see if there is a reaction.
What has your experience been?
And could you recommend Allergist in either So Bay, CA or West Valley, AZ?

REPLY
@jamienolson

@chicagomichelle, @peggyj4411 and @ladycat, Hello and Thank you for starting this important discussion on a topic that we could all benefit from addressing and discussing.

After I was personally addressed at work by another coworker who was offended (and also has respiratory issues) by a scent that I love to wear. I read our work policy and put some thought into how to address this issue. You see, I use an essential oil that helps me focus (something that I struggle with daily) and believe has benefit to me throughout my work day. After talking with supervision I came to the realization of what kind of burden this was posing on others people as well. I had no idea how it was effecting others in our work group. I was able to do some research and found alternative ways to address my focus issues without any smells…which makes for a happy work group! 🙂

Looking into our dress and decorum work policy, I found it reads as is- “It is unacceptable for employees to smell of cigarette smoke or other strong perfumes or odors while at work. Employees who arrive in the work area with the smell of cigarette smoke or other strong smells on their clothing will be required to change before entering the work area”. This is something that is given to all employees when they start here.

In our Allergy and Pulmonary areas there is verbiage on the patients itinerary that kindly asks for patients and attending family members to please avoid perfume and smells in these areas, which is great.

I also looked into our patient education center thinking this would be a good place to have educational material on those that suffer from respiratory issues and what happens when those patients come into contact with strong perfume smells. I found nothing. I then looked for a courtesy sign or something that states information for patient awareness to no avail. The positive spin…. these are all areas with room for improvement! Thank you for helping Mayo Clinic become an even better place for others.

Do any of you have ideas or thoughts for others reading this post on how to politely approach someone that may have an offensive or threatening perfume on? @chicagomichelle, what was the response you received from the hotel guest?

Jump to this post

I thought the same. Change Drs.

REPLY
@jamienolson

@chicagomichelle, @peggyj4411 and @ladycat, Hello and Thank you for starting this important discussion on a topic that we could all benefit from addressing and discussing.

After I was personally addressed at work by another coworker who was offended (and also has respiratory issues) by a scent that I love to wear. I read our work policy and put some thought into how to address this issue. You see, I use an essential oil that helps me focus (something that I struggle with daily) and believe has benefit to me throughout my work day. After talking with supervision I came to the realization of what kind of burden this was posing on others people as well. I had no idea how it was effecting others in our work group. I was able to do some research and found alternative ways to address my focus issues without any smells…which makes for a happy work group! 🙂

Looking into our dress and decorum work policy, I found it reads as is- “It is unacceptable for employees to smell of cigarette smoke or other strong perfumes or odors while at work. Employees who arrive in the work area with the smell of cigarette smoke or other strong smells on their clothing will be required to change before entering the work area”. This is something that is given to all employees when they start here.

In our Allergy and Pulmonary areas there is verbiage on the patients itinerary that kindly asks for patients and attending family members to please avoid perfume and smells in these areas, which is great.

I also looked into our patient education center thinking this would be a good place to have educational material on those that suffer from respiratory issues and what happens when those patients come into contact with strong perfume smells. I found nothing. I then looked for a courtesy sign or something that states information for patient awareness to no avail. The positive spin…. these are all areas with room for improvement! Thank you for helping Mayo Clinic become an even better place for others.

Do any of you have ideas or thoughts for others reading this post on how to politely approach someone that may have an offensive or threatening perfume on? @chicagomichelle, what was the response you received from the hotel guest?

Jump to this post

Whoops, I just noticed a second ago I have been spelling your name wrong! I apologize profusely! I have Rapid Advancing Wet Macular Degeneration in both eyes and cataracts, so my vision kind of sucks. Still, I should have been more careful, Rosemarya! Again, my most sincere apologies! Virtual hugs from New York, Peggy

REPLY
@jamienolson

@chicagomichelle, @peggyj4411 and @ladycat, Hello and Thank you for starting this important discussion on a topic that we could all benefit from addressing and discussing.

After I was personally addressed at work by another coworker who was offended (and also has respiratory issues) by a scent that I love to wear. I read our work policy and put some thought into how to address this issue. You see, I use an essential oil that helps me focus (something that I struggle with daily) and believe has benefit to me throughout my work day. After talking with supervision I came to the realization of what kind of burden this was posing on others people as well. I had no idea how it was effecting others in our work group. I was able to do some research and found alternative ways to address my focus issues without any smells…which makes for a happy work group! 🙂

Looking into our dress and decorum work policy, I found it reads as is- “It is unacceptable for employees to smell of cigarette smoke or other strong perfumes or odors while at work. Employees who arrive in the work area with the smell of cigarette smoke or other strong smells on their clothing will be required to change before entering the work area”. This is something that is given to all employees when they start here.

In our Allergy and Pulmonary areas there is verbiage on the patients itinerary that kindly asks for patients and attending family members to please avoid perfume and smells in these areas, which is great.

I also looked into our patient education center thinking this would be a good place to have educational material on those that suffer from respiratory issues and what happens when those patients come into contact with strong perfume smells. I found nothing. I then looked for a courtesy sign or something that states information for patient awareness to no avail. The positive spin…. these are all areas with room for improvement! Thank you for helping Mayo Clinic become an even better place for others.

Do any of you have ideas or thoughts for others reading this post on how to politely approach someone that may have an offensive or threatening perfume on? @chicagomichelle, what was the response you received from the hotel guest?

Jump to this post

Oh Michelle, you are going through pure Hell! What a horrible experience when you are so sick! The pneumonia alone could have killed you—and having sepsis and that wicked norovirus on top of it, yeeech! I never heard of that ventricle problem before, geez Michelle, that experience is positively awful. God must want you to live for a really good reason–to teach the medical profession a thing or two. You are an incredibely brave person. Start getting better, ya hear? We need you on this wonderful site! Love, Peggy

REPLY
@jamienolson

@chicagomichelle, @peggyj4411 and @ladycat, Hello and Thank you for starting this important discussion on a topic that we could all benefit from addressing and discussing.

After I was personally addressed at work by another coworker who was offended (and also has respiratory issues) by a scent that I love to wear. I read our work policy and put some thought into how to address this issue. You see, I use an essential oil that helps me focus (something that I struggle with daily) and believe has benefit to me throughout my work day. After talking with supervision I came to the realization of what kind of burden this was posing on others people as well. I had no idea how it was effecting others in our work group. I was able to do some research and found alternative ways to address my focus issues without any smells…which makes for a happy work group! 🙂

Looking into our dress and decorum work policy, I found it reads as is- “It is unacceptable for employees to smell of cigarette smoke or other strong perfumes or odors while at work. Employees who arrive in the work area with the smell of cigarette smoke or other strong smells on their clothing will be required to change before entering the work area”. This is something that is given to all employees when they start here.

In our Allergy and Pulmonary areas there is verbiage on the patients itinerary that kindly asks for patients and attending family members to please avoid perfume and smells in these areas, which is great.

I also looked into our patient education center thinking this would be a good place to have educational material on those that suffer from respiratory issues and what happens when those patients come into contact with strong perfume smells. I found nothing. I then looked for a courtesy sign or something that states information for patient awareness to no avail. The positive spin…. these are all areas with room for improvement! Thank you for helping Mayo Clinic become an even better place for others.

Do any of you have ideas or thoughts for others reading this post on how to politely approach someone that may have an offensive or threatening perfume on? @chicagomichelle, what was the response you received from the hotel guest?

Jump to this post

@peggyj4411, Peggy, you spelled my name correctly. It is Rosemary. I do not have a sensitivity to heavy perfume smells, other than an intense dislike for some fragrances. When I read some of these replies, I begin to learn how terrible it must be for you with sensitivity to fragrances.
Have you had an opportunity to speak with your Social Worker yet?
Have you considered speaking with one of the nurses or aides with whom you have a good relationship. Perhaps if you appeal for help from one of them, your concerns might be heard and maybe acted upon.
Rosemary

Liked by ladycat, peggyj4411

REPLY
@jamienolson

@chicagomichelle, @peggyj4411 and @ladycat, Hello and Thank you for starting this important discussion on a topic that we could all benefit from addressing and discussing.

After I was personally addressed at work by another coworker who was offended (and also has respiratory issues) by a scent that I love to wear. I read our work policy and put some thought into how to address this issue. You see, I use an essential oil that helps me focus (something that I struggle with daily) and believe has benefit to me throughout my work day. After talking with supervision I came to the realization of what kind of burden this was posing on others people as well. I had no idea how it was effecting others in our work group. I was able to do some research and found alternative ways to address my focus issues without any smells…which makes for a happy work group! 🙂

Looking into our dress and decorum work policy, I found it reads as is- “It is unacceptable for employees to smell of cigarette smoke or other strong perfumes or odors while at work. Employees who arrive in the work area with the smell of cigarette smoke or other strong smells on their clothing will be required to change before entering the work area”. This is something that is given to all employees when they start here.

In our Allergy and Pulmonary areas there is verbiage on the patients itinerary that kindly asks for patients and attending family members to please avoid perfume and smells in these areas, which is great.

I also looked into our patient education center thinking this would be a good place to have educational material on those that suffer from respiratory issues and what happens when those patients come into contact with strong perfume smells. I found nothing. I then looked for a courtesy sign or something that states information for patient awareness to no avail. The positive spin…. these are all areas with room for improvement! Thank you for helping Mayo Clinic become an even better place for others.

Do any of you have ideas or thoughts for others reading this post on how to politely approach someone that may have an offensive or threatening perfume on? @chicagomichelle, what was the response you received from the hotel guest?

Jump to this post

Hi Rosemary! Thank you for all those great replies; it is so encouraging to communicate with someone who is so sympathetic to me! No, I haven’t spoken with my Social Worker yet but I am due to see her early next week anyway. I am trying to work up conversations with the nurses and aides, but it is difficult. I tell them they smell great (actually, most of them do!) but it’s kind of hard for me to breathe without the oxygen when I am around a lot of those (quote) “luscious smells”. So far I have been ignored or given a dirty look, so I drop the subject. Any approach to perfumes and my respiratory problems usually get ignored, so at the moment I am rather discouraged. I never came out and said I am allergic to your scents; could you please go easy on the perfumes. Another problem, Rosemary, is that these ladies also use a lot of different–smelling hair spray and other hair goop, like gels, mousse, coconut oil, etc. I am violently allergic to all things coconut! Fortunately, not many of these girls saturate themselves with it. I will get back to you for some help on still another allergy misery, perfumed strips in fashion magazines! Gotta go, thank you again for all the many nice things you’ve helped mw with!

Liked by peggyj4411

REPLY

I would order magazines without perfume or when I get a magazine that way I rip out those pages. I agree with u – they stink.

Liked by ladycat, peggyj4411

REPLY
@jamienolson

@chicagomichelle, @peggyj4411 and @ladycat, Hello and Thank you for starting this important discussion on a topic that we could all benefit from addressing and discussing.

After I was personally addressed at work by another coworker who was offended (and also has respiratory issues) by a scent that I love to wear. I read our work policy and put some thought into how to address this issue. You see, I use an essential oil that helps me focus (something that I struggle with daily) and believe has benefit to me throughout my work day. After talking with supervision I came to the realization of what kind of burden this was posing on others people as well. I had no idea how it was effecting others in our work group. I was able to do some research and found alternative ways to address my focus issues without any smells…which makes for a happy work group! 🙂

Looking into our dress and decorum work policy, I found it reads as is- “It is unacceptable for employees to smell of cigarette smoke or other strong perfumes or odors while at work. Employees who arrive in the work area with the smell of cigarette smoke or other strong smells on their clothing will be required to change before entering the work area”. This is something that is given to all employees when they start here.

In our Allergy and Pulmonary areas there is verbiage on the patients itinerary that kindly asks for patients and attending family members to please avoid perfume and smells in these areas, which is great.

I also looked into our patient education center thinking this would be a good place to have educational material on those that suffer from respiratory issues and what happens when those patients come into contact with strong perfume smells. I found nothing. I then looked for a courtesy sign or something that states information for patient awareness to no avail. The positive spin…. these are all areas with room for improvement! Thank you for helping Mayo Clinic become an even better place for others.

Do any of you have ideas or thoughts for others reading this post on how to politely approach someone that may have an offensive or threatening perfume on? @chicagomichelle, what was the response you received from the hotel guest?

Jump to this post

@peggyj4411 Oh dear Peggy, I am so sorry you are going through this. It’s so hard to get those who wear heavy scents to understand. Maybe you can find some back up articles on line and have them ready for when you meet with your social worker. They have to take you seriously. Please do not worry about offending those wearing the scents, they are polluting your fresh air and this is wrong. You would think that in 2017, people should be acutely aware of this.

Today, I hired a “task rabbit” to wash 3 loads of clothes and put fresh sheets on my bed. When she showed up, I could smell her perfume! My heart sank and I unfortunately said nothing. I guess I was pretty desperate for clean sheets. I will never hire someone again without stating no perfumes please. I’m hoping my bedding did not get too terribly tainted.

If you would like some help with talking to the social worker, you are welcome to have them call me. You can say I’m a friend who suffers from the same issue. Maybe 2 voices can be stronger than one here. In any case, please do not give up, you have the right to fresh air. Please stay strong and keep fighting for this and if you would like me to help you, let me know and I will send you my number. xo Michelle

Liked by ladycat, peggyj4411

REPLY
@jamienolson

@chicagomichelle, @peggyj4411 and @ladycat, Hello and Thank you for starting this important discussion on a topic that we could all benefit from addressing and discussing.

After I was personally addressed at work by another coworker who was offended (and also has respiratory issues) by a scent that I love to wear. I read our work policy and put some thought into how to address this issue. You see, I use an essential oil that helps me focus (something that I struggle with daily) and believe has benefit to me throughout my work day. After talking with supervision I came to the realization of what kind of burden this was posing on others people as well. I had no idea how it was effecting others in our work group. I was able to do some research and found alternative ways to address my focus issues without any smells…which makes for a happy work group! 🙂

Looking into our dress and decorum work policy, I found it reads as is- “It is unacceptable for employees to smell of cigarette smoke or other strong perfumes or odors while at work. Employees who arrive in the work area with the smell of cigarette smoke or other strong smells on their clothing will be required to change before entering the work area”. This is something that is given to all employees when they start here.

In our Allergy and Pulmonary areas there is verbiage on the patients itinerary that kindly asks for patients and attending family members to please avoid perfume and smells in these areas, which is great.

I also looked into our patient education center thinking this would be a good place to have educational material on those that suffer from respiratory issues and what happens when those patients come into contact with strong perfume smells. I found nothing. I then looked for a courtesy sign or something that states information for patient awareness to no avail. The positive spin…. these are all areas with room for improvement! Thank you for helping Mayo Clinic become an even better place for others.

Do any of you have ideas or thoughts for others reading this post on how to politely approach someone that may have an offensive or threatening perfume on? @chicagomichelle, what was the response you received from the hotel guest?

Jump to this post

I ask cleaners to wash the perfume off. One person who objected to this wound up being a nut job. They usually are sympathetic.
I don’t like having allergies – can’t do anything about it, in spite of urging that I get used to the smell of picking up dog waste. Do you think its possible to get used to offending smells?

Liked by ladycat, peggyj4411

REPLY
@jamienolson

@chicagomichelle, @peggyj4411 and @ladycat, Hello and Thank you for starting this important discussion on a topic that we could all benefit from addressing and discussing.

After I was personally addressed at work by another coworker who was offended (and also has respiratory issues) by a scent that I love to wear. I read our work policy and put some thought into how to address this issue. You see, I use an essential oil that helps me focus (something that I struggle with daily) and believe has benefit to me throughout my work day. After talking with supervision I came to the realization of what kind of burden this was posing on others people as well. I had no idea how it was effecting others in our work group. I was able to do some research and found alternative ways to address my focus issues without any smells…which makes for a happy work group! 🙂

Looking into our dress and decorum work policy, I found it reads as is- “It is unacceptable for employees to smell of cigarette smoke or other strong perfumes or odors while at work. Employees who arrive in the work area with the smell of cigarette smoke or other strong smells on their clothing will be required to change before entering the work area”. This is something that is given to all employees when they start here.

In our Allergy and Pulmonary areas there is verbiage on the patients itinerary that kindly asks for patients and attending family members to please avoid perfume and smells in these areas, which is great.

I also looked into our patient education center thinking this would be a good place to have educational material on those that suffer from respiratory issues and what happens when those patients come into contact with strong perfume smells. I found nothing. I then looked for a courtesy sign or something that states information for patient awareness to no avail. The positive spin…. these are all areas with room for improvement! Thank you for helping Mayo Clinic become an even better place for others.

Do any of you have ideas or thoughts for others reading this post on how to politely approach someone that may have an offensive or threatening perfume on? @chicagomichelle, what was the response you received from the hotel guest?

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The problem is when it’s permeated the persons clothing, it can’t really be wiped off then.

For me, it is worse when I have a respitory infection. My senses become heightened and I react to everything. I believe the infection I currently have has been brewing since I last left Mayo. I needed to stay in a Minneapolis hotel that was brand new and still smelled of paint. My eyes burned the entire time there. When I came home, I tried to drink from a bottle of water in my fridge. It was a plastic Gatorade bottle and I could literally taste the chemicals in the plastic. That probably should have been my first clue. It’s a terrible thing to have to live with, especially when it’s not well understood.

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Dear members, @mari, @chicagomichelle, @peggyj4411, @ladycat, @katemn, It appears to me that along with the fragrance and scent allergies and reactions, that there is also a severe reaction to certain medications. So I am wondering if any of you wear a medical alert ID to inform medical care response team in case of an emergency. I wear one, it is on a very nice bracelet that I selected specifically for that purpose. Mine is in case of emergency to alert due to my immunosuppression for transplant medications. It also comes in handy to show to a doubting ER intake person!
Sending you warm thoughts today. And hope of sunshine tomorrow.
Rosemary

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