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boilerman
@boilerman

Posts: 2
Joined: Jul 03, 2018

Have others had heart problems after having teeth removed for Dentures

Posted by @boilerman, Tue, Jul 3 8:03am

Shortly after having my teeth pulled for dentures I began to retain water and after awhile went to my doctor and found out my heart was in A-fib. After seeing a Cardiologist and he had an echo cardiogram done he said it looked like Amyloidosis had started to thicken my heart walls. I went through several test and the results were mixed as if I have this or not. My blood tests showed no signs of it and after a month of tests my blood tests started to look better than they first looked. I've been thinking about what may have started this and I really wonder if the dentist who had stated I had some gum disease but he never treated my for it, if this release of disease when my teeth were pulled had caused my blood to start producing the protein that Amyloidosis is from and put my heart into A-fib? Tests have been sent to the Mayo Clinic for them to review to see if I should go to the clinic and they find the tests as being questionable as to being positive to Amyloidosis and would probably run many of the tests again , But they can not see me until Aug or maybe even Sept. Well I can not wait that long to get help due to the shortness of breath, not getting enough blood to my lungs when doing just simple things at work or home. Just walking is getting much tougher to do. Has anyone heard of having there heart go into A-fib after having removal of teeth?

REPLY

Hello. I'm sorry to hear about the problems you had after your teeth were extracted. I can not give you an answer to your question but I can tell you that I have cardiac symptoms (shortness of breath, fatigue, fluid retention) which remain a mystery to my doctors. The symptoms are always much worse after any type of dental procedure……even just a cleaning. My doctors can not explain this. I do know that large amounts of bacteria are released into the blood stream during any type of dental procedure. These bacteria can cause a blood infection (septicemia) which is very serious. These bacteria also seem to attach to tissue in the body that is not healthy. Maybe you had an underlying heart issue prior to the teeth extractions. Many people have to be pre-medicated with antibiotics prior to dental procedures if they have conditions that make them susceptible to infections such as mechanical heart valve, diseased valve, joint replacements, etc. It's good that you are with the Mayo clinic. Possibly your local doctor can get you seen sooner if he calls them directly? Have you tried the other Mayo Clinic locations? Also, have they told you what your ejection fraction is? An echocardiagram estimates this measurement which tells you the strength of the hearts ability to pump blood to the rest of the body. Generally a value of greater than 50% is considered normal.

No one else has had any problems with heart disease after dental work?

@maryd

Hello. I'm sorry to hear about the problems you had after your teeth were extracted. I can not give you an answer to your question but I can tell you that I have cardiac symptoms (shortness of breath, fatigue, fluid retention) which remain a mystery to my doctors. The symptoms are always much worse after any type of dental procedure……even just a cleaning. My doctors can not explain this. I do know that large amounts of bacteria are released into the blood stream during any type of dental procedure. These bacteria can cause a blood infection (septicemia) which is very serious. These bacteria also seem to attach to tissue in the body that is not healthy. Maybe you had an underlying heart issue prior to the teeth extractions. Many people have to be pre-medicated with antibiotics prior to dental procedures if they have conditions that make them susceptible to infections such as mechanical heart valve, diseased valve, joint replacements, etc. It's good that you are with the Mayo clinic. Possibly your local doctor can get you seen sooner if he calls them directly? Have you tried the other Mayo Clinic locations? Also, have they told you what your ejection fraction is? An echocardiagram estimates this measurement which tells you the strength of the hearts ability to pump blood to the rest of the body. Generally a value of greater than 50% is considered normal.

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Dental issues can lead to Cardiac problems.Exact reason is not known.I had heart attack at 58.Suffered many dental issues in child hood and then even in last 10 years before heart attack.Best is to take care of Dental problems right now for kids .Minimum Sugar is good for teeth and heart also.

Hi @boilerman,

The American Dental Association (ADA) and American Heart Association (AHA) have acknowledged the relationship between gum disease and heart disease. Gum disease may increase the risk of heart disease because inflammation in the gums and bacteria may eventually lead to narrowing of important arteries, but more research is needed.
http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/Dental-Health-and-Heart-Health_UCM_459358_Article.jsp#.W0aqXS3MxhB

I'm tagging @2011panc and Mentor @windwalker as they've both mentioned heart-related conditions after dental work. You might also wish to see this discussion, "Getting dentures" https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/still-at-it/ on Connect.

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