Cricoid Chondrosarcoma

Posted by deborahe @deborahe, Feb 25, 2017

I am currently being treated for this rare cancer at Mayo Rochester. Anyone else with this condition?

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When my surgeon Dr. Eric Moore shared that my voice would never be the same, I asked him if he could make it a blend between Barry White and Luther Vandross. The good news is that I still have a voice and unfortunately could not carry a tune in a paper bag. God luck with your next surgery and keep us informed.

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@jeffk

When my surgeon Dr. Eric Moore shared that my voice would never be the same, I asked him if he could make it a blend between Barry White and Luther Vandross. The good news is that I still have a voice and unfortunately could not carry a tune in a paper bag. God luck with your next surgery and keep us informed.

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Jeff, I could maybe do a little Bob Dylan 😉 I was recently back at Mayo for my annual CT scan, and all is good! As a result, my next scan will be in 2 years instead of 1. I also had a consult with Dr Bayan who specializes in voice disorders to see if anything could be done to improve the quality of my voice; she did not feel there were any great options that would be worth the risk of compromising my airway. It was worth checking out, though. Hope all is well with you! -Deb

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Deb, I'm so glad all was good on your CT scan! Thank you for sharing that. @jeffk , sorry you didn't get the best of Barry and Luther. Were you able to sing before? I've been singing tenor in the choir with my husband for the last several years. I really miss singing along to the car radio too. But the airway is more important. It is rather unsettling to think that my voice will be different. I will let you know what happens!

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@deborahe

Jeff, I could maybe do a little Bob Dylan 😉 I was recently back at Mayo for my annual CT scan, and all is good! As a result, my next scan will be in 2 years instead of 1. I also had a consult with Dr Bayan who specializes in voice disorders to see if anything could be done to improve the quality of my voice; she did not feel there were any great options that would be worth the risk of compromising my airway. It was worth checking out, though. Hope all is well with you! -Deb

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Deb, I am so happy for you that your CT scan was all good and you are 2 years out from the next. My voice consult yielded the same answer. I was actually more interested in the breathing aspect given I was a marathon runner. The consensus was that the paralyzed vocal cord was in a great position to allow the functional one to open and close which provided total functionality. The risk in trying to open the airway could easily compromise swallowing, breathing and talking. I chose to keep it blocking 50% of my airway and learning to deal with it. Good news is that I am still running shorter distances, but all good! I never could sing anyway, my priest actually asked me to not sing in church way before I was diagnosed.

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@deborahe

Good luck with your next surgery and take good care of yourself. Let us know how it goes!

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Hi Deb and @jeffk , just letting you know that my vocal chord surgery went quite well. The surgeon used one of my muscles to attach the Gore-Tex wedge, as the trachea was too friable. He's expecting the muscle to atrophy such that the chord will be in the right position in a couple months. I feel so fortunate, as COVID policies were changing rapidly during the two days I was in the hospital. I was still able to have my follow-up bronchoscope last week, which showed that the airway looks great. I was allowed to start practicing with my voice a couple days ago. It's small and raspy, and it takes a few tries to get started, like a stubborn lawn mower. But I do think it will sound like the old me. The cats and my husband are thrilled to hear it. I think singing will be possible too. Hoping all is well with you and your loved ones. Take care!

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@julie010

Hi Deb and @jeffk , just letting you know that my vocal chord surgery went quite well. The surgeon used one of my muscles to attach the Gore-Tex wedge, as the trachea was too friable. He's expecting the muscle to atrophy such that the chord will be in the right position in a couple months. I feel so fortunate, as COVID policies were changing rapidly during the two days I was in the hospital. I was still able to have my follow-up bronchoscope last week, which showed that the airway looks great. I was allowed to start practicing with my voice a couple days ago. It's small and raspy, and it takes a few tries to get started, like a stubborn lawn mower. But I do think it will sound like the old me. The cats and my husband are thrilled to hear it. I think singing will be possible too. Hoping all is well with you and your loved ones. Take care!

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Julie, What fantastic news! I’m so glad you were able to have your procedure done and have such an excellent outcome. All the best to you as you continue to heal and find your voice again. Keep us posted on your progress! -Deb

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Julie, thank for sharing such a bright spot amongst all the concern. So delighted that you were able to have the procedure and more importantly that it was successful. Hope that your voice continues it's path back to a new normal. I believe that it sound's like you will be joining Deb and I on the other side of all of this. I assure that at the end of the very painful journey is an unbelievable feeling of gratitude and appreciation for each and every day that we have with full functionality and life! Be safe and as Deb said, keep us informed we are cheering and praying for you! Jeff

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@deborahe

Julie, What fantastic news! I’m so glad you were able to have your procedure done and have such an excellent outcome. All the best to you as you continue to heal and find your voice again. Keep us posted on your progress! -Deb

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Hi Deb and @jeffk, I've been thinking about you often and hoping all is well with you. It's been 2 years since the Gore-Tex implant to prop up my paralyzed vocal cord. About 10 months ago, I had another surgery, this time to take lipids from my abdomen and inject them into my vocal cord to plump it up and make better contact with the other one. It made my voice less raspy and gave me a little more volume. The benefits are expected to fade over time. On a good day, my singing range is half an octave in the baritone range, but I played my clarinet with the alumni band at a football game last fall, and it felt exactly like normal (even while marching). Good to have some endurance back. Continuing to be grateful for you and your inspiration! Take care. -Julie

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@julie010

Hi Deb and @jeffk, I've been thinking about you often and hoping all is well with you. It's been 2 years since the Gore-Tex implant to prop up my paralyzed vocal cord. About 10 months ago, I had another surgery, this time to take lipids from my abdomen and inject them into my vocal cord to plump it up and make better contact with the other one. It made my voice less raspy and gave me a little more volume. The benefits are expected to fade over time. On a good day, my singing range is half an octave in the baritone range, but I played my clarinet with the alumni band at a football game last fall, and it felt exactly like normal (even while marching). Good to have some endurance back. Continuing to be grateful for you and your inspiration! Take care. -Julie

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That is wonderful! Continued good health to you, Julie.
-Deb

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@julie010

Hi Deb and @jeffk, I've been thinking about you often and hoping all is well with you. It's been 2 years since the Gore-Tex implant to prop up my paralyzed vocal cord. About 10 months ago, I had another surgery, this time to take lipids from my abdomen and inject them into my vocal cord to plump it up and make better contact with the other one. It made my voice less raspy and gave me a little more volume. The benefits are expected to fade over time. On a good day, my singing range is half an octave in the baritone range, but I played my clarinet with the alumni band at a football game last fall, and it felt exactly like normal (even while marching). Good to have some endurance back. Continuing to be grateful for you and your inspiration! Take care. -Julie

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Julie, thank you for sharing yet another successful leg of your journey. I am so happy that all of the prayers that everyone has said for you are being answered. As a runner, with comprised breathing because of my paralyzed vocal cord I have huge admiration for you being able to play the clarinet while marching. God bless and God speed!

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