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Travis J Griffin
@travisjgriffin

Posts: 1
Joined: Oct 13, 2018

Chronic dizziness due to vestibular issues.

Posted by @travisjgriffin, Sat, Oct 13 2:51pm

How does someone deal with chronic dizziness when nothing seems to help?

REPLY

Have you been to see a vestibular rehab specialist (VRT)? Check into it in your area. And stick with it. The ex’s can be tedious and provoke symptoms, but if you see it through to the end, you’ll be glad you did.

Since you’ve been diagnosed, you are seeing a dr. The above advice sounds good. You could ask your dr. about any breathing techniques that might help especially when you’re having a dizzy episode.

I could also suggest a physical therapist who works with cervical spine surgery patients. I had some dizziness prior to my cervical spine surgery when muscle spasms were moving C1 & C2 around. They were rotating or tilting because one side of my neck was tighter, and if the alignment was off, all I had to do to cause dizziness was to look upward. My PT was able to work on the muscles and get the vertebrae into better alignment which stopped the dizziness. Since I had a cervical fusion surgery, it doesn't happen anymore. You might want to ask for MRI imaging so they can see what is happening. They also need to know if there is any instability before a PT works on you as it can be risky if there is instability. I'm still in physical therapy because of thoracic outlet syndrome and working on the tighter side of my neck while strengthening the muscles that oppose the tight ones carefully. I also work to rebuild muscle that was lost due to the spine issue and build core strength which helps everything.

Liked by DELIA SANDERSON

Hi, one thing that has helped is Florinef 0.1mg x 1 daily for orthostatic hypotension which my doctor diagnosed in 2016 but did nothing about? But it did not get rid of the daily dizziness so I had to start all over. I found out that chronic right lateral and posterior cerebellar infarcts, which are small strokes cause dizziness. I also found a syndrome called PICA. After I read the symptoms one stood out, HICCUPS. I clearly remember having horrific hiccups that made me want to kill myself because they were so persistent and would not go away. Luckily, my husband was a witness to them during the time that I believe I had my last bit of mini strokes that started this new onset of crazy dizziness. I am starting Vestibular therapy next week, ordered by my Neurologist. I have a follow up appt with her next week also, which means that my husband will have to go and be my backup person so that she believes that I am not making the hiccup story up. It all makes sense because I have the hiccups a lot. I have a super horrific migraine today with awful visuals in between both eyes. Oh, but here is what I have been doing every morning in order to get out of bed…two 20mg of adderall and two Fiorcet pills with a bottle of (white) Gatorade along with the Florinef and one Zofran for nausea. I have a paradoxical effect to meds whereas Aderrall makes me sleepy and Zofran and Fiorcet make me hyper. If your dizziness is caused by mini strokes I have read that we cannot do anything about it except control our blood pressure and cholesterol. Since starting Repatha my cholesterol dropped from 354 to 204. I am a tiny person who is unable to eat a healthy diet so to gastroperisis, lemmel's syndrome, sphincter's that do not work, etc…and depend on ensure and lots of liquid vitamins to keep me healthy. And, I have never smoked. I have multiple health problems do to Heavy metal toxicity poisoning shutting down my system from elemental mercury toxicity vapors while working at a Biotech company from 2010. The MRI results are from a diagnosis for Trigeminal Neuralgia. I also have severe Peripheral Neuralgia, just to name a few reasons for having vertigo aka severe dizziness. I hope this helps. Krissy

@krissylamb

Hi, one thing that has helped is Florinef 0.1mg x 1 daily for orthostatic hypotension which my doctor diagnosed in 2016 but did nothing about? But it did not get rid of the daily dizziness so I had to start all over. I found out that chronic right lateral and posterior cerebellar infarcts, which are small strokes cause dizziness. I also found a syndrome called PICA. After I read the symptoms one stood out, HICCUPS. I clearly remember having horrific hiccups that made me want to kill myself because they were so persistent and would not go away. Luckily, my husband was a witness to them during the time that I believe I had my last bit of mini strokes that started this new onset of crazy dizziness. I am starting Vestibular therapy next week, ordered by my Neurologist. I have a follow up appt with her next week also, which means that my husband will have to go and be my backup person so that she believes that I am not making the hiccup story up. It all makes sense because I have the hiccups a lot. I have a super horrific migraine today with awful visuals in between both eyes. Oh, but here is what I have been doing every morning in order to get out of bed…two 20mg of adderall and two Fiorcet pills with a bottle of (white) Gatorade along with the Florinef and one Zofran for nausea. I have a paradoxical effect to meds whereas Aderrall makes me sleepy and Zofran and Fiorcet make me hyper. If your dizziness is caused by mini strokes I have read that we cannot do anything about it except control our blood pressure and cholesterol. Since starting Repatha my cholesterol dropped from 354 to 204. I am a tiny person who is unable to eat a healthy diet so to gastroperisis, lemmel's syndrome, sphincter's that do not work, etc…and depend on ensure and lots of liquid vitamins to keep me healthy. And, I have never smoked. I have multiple health problems do to Heavy metal toxicity poisoning shutting down my system from elemental mercury toxicity vapors while working at a Biotech company from 2010. The MRI results are from a diagnosis for Trigeminal Neuralgia. I also have severe Peripheral Neuralgia, just to name a few reasons for having vertigo aka severe dizziness. I hope this helps. Krissy

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Dear Krissy, I wouldn’t worry about your dr.. not believing about your non-stop hiccup incidents. You know yourself, just believe in yourself as it’s you he’ll be treating and it’s your input that’s crucial and your feedback that helps him in creating a successful healing regimen for you. Compassion starts with trusting yourself, caring for yourself and it looks like you’re putting your focus in the right corner asking your husband to support you and setting up the appointment with your neurologist. I hope healing comes soon, God bless you.

@deliasanderson

Dear Krissy, I wouldn’t worry about your dr.. not believing about your non-stop hiccup incidents. You know yourself, just believe in yourself as it’s you he’ll be treating and it’s your input that’s crucial and your feedback that helps him in creating a successful healing regimen for you. Compassion starts with trusting yourself, caring for yourself and it looks like you’re putting your focus in the right corner asking your husband to support you and setting up the appointment with your neurologist. I hope healing comes soon, God bless you.

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Thx,Lisa

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Yes, chronic dizziness. Had my condition for over 3 years. Plus research on my part, advocate, files and articles. I was fortunate, when I had my initial symptoms, able to drive(fortunately, never lost my ability for safe driving), and fortunately, had an insightful compassionate young physician at the ER of a mid sized hospital. Did a professional neurological assessment and CAT scan to brain. Soon later had an MRI to discount any critical changes in cerebral area. Again, an insightful physician at same hospital, at mid night. I am not really sure of the diagnosis but that physician did his best, my dx: bppv positional vertigo(my symptoms were not consistent with positional changes). Later a smaller hospital, not impressed with the physician there, lacked a neurological assessment only a brief talk about vestibular dynamics(and useless prescribe of ativert(meclizine: same useless cheaper cover). As I coped with my condition, constant research , first one must do is define the symptoms most likely and use the proper term. Dizziness is usually a lay useless term. I did find the best summary of balance problems/vertigo at Brightham & Women's hospital, I believe the chief neurologist: D. Samuels. Vertigo, yes, can be associated with vestibular area, anxiety, or central areas of the brain. I did have a second opinion of my MRI to selected neurologist to validate that image. Then go from there, log the symptoms and signs, research the better options of physicians and other resources(herbal: ginger, Quercetin, etc.)…plus ultimately a holistic integrated approach. Luckily my symptoms has not worsen and a load full of information and insightful professionals on subject.

Liked by DELIA SANDERSON

@jczarkowski1270

Yes, chronic dizziness. Had my condition for over 3 years. Plus research on my part, advocate, files and articles. I was fortunate, when I had my initial symptoms, able to drive(fortunately, never lost my ability for safe driving), and fortunately, had an insightful compassionate young physician at the ER of a mid sized hospital. Did a professional neurological assessment and CAT scan to brain. Soon later had an MRI to discount any critical changes in cerebral area. Again, an insightful physician at same hospital, at mid night. I am not really sure of the diagnosis but that physician did his best, my dx: bppv positional vertigo(my symptoms were not consistent with positional changes). Later a smaller hospital, not impressed with the physician there, lacked a neurological assessment only a brief talk about vestibular dynamics(and useless prescribe of ativert(meclizine: same useless cheaper cover). As I coped with my condition, constant research , first one must do is define the symptoms most likely and use the proper term. Dizziness is usually a lay useless term. I did find the best summary of balance problems/vertigo at Brightham & Women's hospital, I believe the chief neurologist: D. Samuels. Vertigo, yes, can be associated with vestibular area, anxiety, or central areas of the brain. I did have a second opinion of my MRI to selected neurologist to validate that image. Then go from there, log the symptoms and signs, research the better options of physicians and other resources(herbal: ginger, Quercetin, etc.)…plus ultimately a holistic integrated approach. Luckily my symptoms has not worsen and a load full of information and insightful professionals on subject.

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Thankyou for sharing your personal research journey. Your optimism and self-determination to be part of the solution in communicating as precisely as possible with your drs. is reflective of a self-trust culminating in a trust in the drs. Also, your path of integrating holistic medicine and studying it shows your awareness of yourself throughout your fear and pain. It seems your pain has caused you to grow in research and understanding. You are aware that your condition has stabilized and do everything within your power to keep it there. Standing back from your suffering and asking the question, what attitude will I choose towards my physical reality….. and there are only 2 answers: the first is to feel helpless and hopeless and angry at yourself and everyone who attempts to help, as a result, you share this anger not with them but at them and the second answer, which you’ve chosen, is to operate from your permanent joyous self that may get shrouded by pain, physical and emotional from time to time but is always there. Only courage (belief in the real self, born of wisdom) can summon it up, in the darkest hours. Aristotle, Socrates, Plato, Confucius, Buddha, etc…all the highly so-named enlightened ones condensed all knowledge to “know thyself and to thine own self be true”. You are a beacon of courage (laying aside self-doubt about your own painful experience and forging ahead inspite of your condition for the best possible outcome). Acceptance helps us wake the next day and our attitude in difficult, trying, painful circumstances allows us to rise above it and be proactive in whatever way we feel we can. You have remained stable and, it would appear, very independent. You have been responsible in expanding your conscious world and it would seem, continue to do so. You have acknowledged good drs. and professionals along the way with gratitude. Furthermore, you chose to share your coping strategies with this group with the goal of helping others. Yes, you’ve voiced the odd complaint (discernment can be a gift) but you don’t allow it to weaken or dominate your positive attitude, as a matter of fact, it fueled you; you became more driven to define your symptoms and better understand what was happening and communicate as transparently as possible your own physical experience with your healthcare professionals so as to enhance diagnosis and treatment. You bring a positive message to encourage others to believe in themselves. You have highlighted that healing in this field of sensations requires teamwork. The patient is on one team, as she’s the source of changing effects within her body and the translator of such symptoms. The healthcare professionals (many drs. work together with naturopaths) are on the same team. If you and the others on your healing team work against each other, it’s sabotage and healing takes a backseat in lieu of ego. Co-operation with each member, mutual respect, listening with 2 ears, explaining so as to be heard, results in the strongest team. When all members of the team stay on the same course of intention, i.e., reducing pain and optimizing a desired quality of life through proper diagnosis and careful well-examined follow-up treatment, this combines all relevant research and knowledge for this particular patient (and she is ever so mindful that she is part of her healing team) and thus, treatments and/or procedures are custom-made to fit the cause and effects of her condition(s). I know hospitals and doctors’ offices are very busy and patients can feel like they are just a number but you didn’t forget your name and the team you carefully chose to be on hasn’t forgotten your name. You have coordinated your health resources and connected them to serve you satisfactorily. Thx again for being a light in promoting the importance of a patient’s belief in the crucial role of proactive honest input and authentic communication with healthcare professionals in seeking cure/healing when, unfortunately, afflicted. Suffering, whether emotional and/or physical is global and how to deal with it, at either level, is key to optimum recovery and the same, finding calm within the storm.

Liked by Jennifer Hunter

@deliasanderson

Since you’ve been diagnosed, you are seeing a dr. The above advice sounds good. You could ask your dr. about any breathing techniques that might help especially when you’re having a dizzy episode.

Jump to this post

hello – you mention breathing techniques to help with dizziness. This is the first I've heard about this –
what is it all about? Tks Gloria

One of the suggestions for me was to cut out salt. This is really hard for me but it helped not only the dizzy but lowered the sound level of tinnitus . I know when I have used too much salt. Dizzy and screaming ears.

Liked by DELIA SANDERSON

@gloriajean

hello – you mention breathing techniques to help with dizziness. This is the first I've heard about this –
what is it all about? Tks Gloria

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Taking a few deep breaths through your nose, slowly and breathing out, through your nose, as slow as you can, a few times helps bring more oxygen to the body (brain). This helps with balance and equilibrium. Closing ones eyes helps the focusing of breathing deep from the lower abs and releasing from the lower abs. This brings focus to the whole body working as one. Even out walking in nature and stretching out one arm into tree trunk with palm outstretched while pressing into its beautiful natural bark, with eyes open, and taking 2 deep breaths and repeat on the other side with the other arm. For me, if I do at least 7 deep breaths a day, it clears my head. Breathing from lower abs makes me mindful of how my stomach feels and to nurture it with healthy foods. Dodir in post below talks about controlling salt, yes, that’s wise! A certain amount of salt can irritate the ears and cause dizziness. That’s my personal experience. Eating only what the body needs to function optimally can be seen a lot more clearly when we practice deep ab breathing. It’s hard to breathe if the stomach is overloaded. If we had a little X-ray machine in front of us showing how our organs function while breathing, while eating, while exercising, it would help us to become more aware of how our systems are so dependent on each other. The only x-Ray we have, is how we feel when we breathe in slowly and out slowly. This exercise really puts us in touch with our own bodies. It slows us down and increases our awareness.

@dodir

One of the suggestions for me was to cut out salt. This is really hard for me but it helped not only the dizzy but lowered the sound level of tinnitus . I know when I have used too much salt. Dizzy and screaming ears.

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I agree wholeheartedly.

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