Chronic dizziness due to vestibular issues.

Posted by Travis J Griffin @travisjgriffin, Oct 13, 2018

How does someone deal with chronic dizziness when nothing seems to help?

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One of the suggestions for me was to cut out salt. This is really hard for me but it helped not only the dizzy but lowered the sound level of tinnitus . I know when I have used too much salt. Dizzy and screaming ears.

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@gloriajean

hello – you mention breathing techniques to help with dizziness. This is the first I've heard about this –
what is it all about? Tks Gloria

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Taking a few deep breaths through your nose, slowly and breathing out, through your nose, as slow as you can, a few times helps bring more oxygen to the body (brain). This helps with balance and equilibrium. Closing ones eyes helps the focusing of breathing deep from the lower abs and releasing from the lower abs. This brings focus to the whole body working as one. Even out walking in nature and stretching out one arm into tree trunk with palm outstretched while pressing into its beautiful natural bark, with eyes open, and taking 2 deep breaths and repeat on the other side with the other arm. For me, if I do at least 7 deep breaths a day, it clears my head. Breathing from lower abs makes me mindful of how my stomach feels and to nurture it with healthy foods. Dodir in post below talks about controlling salt, yes, that’s wise! A certain amount of salt can irritate the ears and cause dizziness. That’s my personal experience. Eating only what the body needs to function optimally can be seen a lot more clearly when we practice deep ab breathing. It’s hard to breathe if the stomach is overloaded. If we had a little X-ray machine in front of us showing how our organs function while breathing, while eating, while exercising, it would help us to become more aware of how our systems are so dependent on each other. The only x-Ray we have, is how we feel when we breathe in slowly and out slowly. This exercise really puts us in touch with our own bodies. It slows us down and increases our awareness.

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@dodir

One of the suggestions for me was to cut out salt. This is really hard for me but it helped not only the dizzy but lowered the sound level of tinnitus . I know when I have used too much salt. Dizzy and screaming ears.

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I agree wholeheartedly.

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Vestibular dysfunction— dizziness

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@larry35

Vestibular dysfunction— dizziness

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Hello Larry @larry35, Welcome to Connect. You will notice that we changed the title of your discussion so that other members will know what the discussion is about and will be able to join in and share their experience or suggestions. From what I have read, dizziness and trouble with your balance are the most common symptoms of vestibular dysfunction.

Have you been diagnosed with vestibular dysfunction? Do you have specific questions you are trying to get answered?

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@johnbishop

Hello Larry @larry35, Welcome to Connect. You will notice that we changed the title of your discussion so that other members will know what the discussion is about and will be able to join in and share their experience or suggestions. From what I have read, dizziness and trouble with your balance are the most common symptoms of vestibular dysfunction.

Have you been diagnosed with vestibular dysfunction? Do you have specific questions you are trying to get answered?

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I have been diagnosed with vestibular dysfunction one year ago without concussion and have been going to therapy for one year with improvements—still can not be around loud talking or loud tv and being in big box stores is a real challenge— will it ever get completely better—

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@larry35

I have been diagnosed with vestibular dysfunction one year ago without concussion and have been going to therapy for one year with improvements—still can not be around loud talking or loud tv and being in big box stores is a real challenge— will it ever get completely better—

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@larry35, I wished I had an answer for your question. I know I would probably be asking the same thing if it were me. There are some tips that might help you some on the Vestibular.Org site — Living with a Vestibular Disorder – VeDA: https://vestibular.org/article/coping-support/living-with-a-vestibular-disorder/

@lioness, @nurseheadakes and others have posted about sensitivity to loud noises and may have some information or suggestions on your question.

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@johnbishop

@larry35, I wished I had an answer for your question. I know I would probably be asking the same thing if it were me. There are some tips that might help you some on the Vestibular.Org site — Living with a Vestibular Disorder – VeDA: https://vestibular.org/article/coping-support/living-with-a-vestibular-disorder/

@lioness, @nurseheadakes and others have posted about sensitivity to loud noises and may have some information or suggestions on your question.

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Ah…the world of the brain and everything centralized vestibular malfunction-dysfunction and syndromes that come from the microscopic area within the cochlear. While researchers and scientists know about this region and are now studying it with great interest, they have few answers as to how to treat anything related to any of the multiple functional disorders that center in and around this area. I have had hearing loss since birth – no known reason but suspect genetic. Over the years since I was not diagnosed until I was 48 years old, I encountered and was involved in three MVA, was diagnosed with two anerysms of the Circle of Willis – inorperable, have fallen from 20+ feet resulting in compound fractures of left leg. and complete fracture of left foot, have had COVID, and Influenzas twice, almost died from C-diff sepsis and have a compromised immune system. I have been diagnosed with centralized vertigo, vestibular migraines, hypercusis, and vision changes of the right eye. With these symptoms, I micromanage my care with my physicians 50/50%. I am a retired nurse – so I have learned how to care for myself and worked to learn about these difficulties. They didn't just all happen at the same time. They started a little at a time and great to be monster that needed to be tamed. Trial and error in med management, hearing aids and sound mufflers helped. I stopped going out – avoiding loud places – I reported them by giving my opinion on all places I visited – giving bad reviews wherever I encountered TOO much noise. People stayed away and the businesses noticed and changed their ways. I speak my mind and if they don't like it – I am a consumer and will take my business else where. I am a leader with HLAA and show them the TALK/WALK. This goes for doctors and health care workers as well. Even my own. If they don't like it – I find another doctor. Truth may hurt but it helps. I have a plan that works for me now because I have meds that work for me as my diseases advance as I am aging. I have memory loss because my brain is atrophying – no help with my brain in early life to hear. We must help our kids understand this before they are like me. It is too late for me but not for them Kids today have grandparents damage to their ears already. It's a shame. There is no catching up for them.
The best thing you can do is work with your doctors and learn about each of your brain diseases. Search the research organizations that are actually looking at this right now. Stay tuned to their studies. Ask for what is currently being treated for your symptoms – give them a try. Diary you symptoms like I do and have for many years. That is the only way you can see what is happening. Mine are tracked by 5 different organizations including the Alzheimes org. because I have it. I have two university systems waiting for my brain when I die. I am a hot tomato! Anyway… Hearing Health Foundation is an excellent organization that tracks many of our brain disorders – you can check out their website and receive their magazine. Eloise

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