Bronchiectasis and diet

Posted by ckscoville @ckscoville, Sun, Jul 26 2:06pm

I’ve heard and read conflicting views and recommendations regarding the best diet for those of us with Bronchiectasis, esp. regarding dairy products and whether they contribute to mucus production. What have you found out regarding diet and foods that trigger problems?

@ckscoville I have read that it just thickens the mucus so we notice it more rather than making more mucus.

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@heathert

@ckscoville I have read that it just thickens the mucus so we notice it more rather than making more mucus.

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Yes. I agree with your comment. It coats the mucous giving the impression it increases production

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@ckscoville I have always heard that, but never noticed it myself, unless I consume a lot of dairy in a single day, then my saliva seems more "slimy". It seems not to affect the mucus I clear from my lungs using either the airway device or neb.
Sue

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Hi CK, you’ve likely heard about, perhaps read about the recognition over the relatively recent past of the outsized role our gut health plays in the regulation of our overall health, including the so-called gut-lung axis. Happily it turns out that actions on our part that foster gut health do the same for overall health. A real “win/win! The ticket: plenty of dietary fiber in the food you chow down. You can amp it a bit more by adding some fermented stuff like unpasteurized sauerkraut and/or kimchi (found in the refrigerator case at the grocery). Amp it even further by ditching all animal protein. Warning: make this change at the risk of becoming as startlingly handsome as me. Don

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I was diagnosed with bronchiectasis about 2years ago. I had never heard of it . Glad to find others with it. Thumperguy – while I have always heard of kimchi, I've known nothing about it. Do you eat it as is or do you put it in a recipe?

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@barbb

I was diagnosed with bronchiectasis about 2years ago. I had never heard of it . Glad to find others with it. Thumperguy – while I have always heard of kimchi, I've known nothing about it. Do you eat it as is or do you put it in a recipe?

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As is. Probably 2 to 3 ounces daily. I make it myself.

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Would you share your recipe for kimchi and let us know how you manage to eat 2-3 ounces a day? Thanks!

I also try to drink kombucha every day, kefir when I can and I keep a good supply of probiotics capsules to take every day. I’ve basically given up dairy, gluten, sugar and alcohol except for the odd glass of red wine. I was never much of a meat eater so that’s been easy. My beverages of choice have become filtered water with apple cider vinegar and/or tea made from fresh lemon juice and ginger root.

Since this is a thread on diet, I won’t even start on other ways I’ve changed my life since I decided to try to take control of my “recovery”. Thanks again to everyone on this forum for all the helpful information that has enabled me to do this.

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@thumperguy

Hi CK, you’ve likely heard about, perhaps read about the recognition over the relatively recent past of the outsized role our gut health plays in the regulation of our overall health, including the so-called gut-lung axis. Happily it turns out that actions on our part that foster gut health do the same for overall health. A real “win/win! The ticket: plenty of dietary fiber in the food you chow down. You can amp it a bit more by adding some fermented stuff like unpasteurized sauerkraut and/or kimchi (found in the refrigerator case at the grocery). Amp it even further by ditching all animal protein. Warning: make this change at the risk of becoming as startlingly handsome as me. Don

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Don, I concur with the gut-lung axis theory. I have been on a WFPB (whole food plant based) diet for a couple of years now, and recommend it for general good health. We have been trained for decades to believe animal protein is essential to good health, not true in my opinion. There are a couple of good books out there that explains the WFPB diet very well, "How Not to Die" and "The China Study". Also a good documentary is "The Game Changers" on Netflix. Bill

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Thanks for the references; I’ll check them out

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@poodledoc

Don, I concur with the gut-lung axis theory. I have been on a WFPB (whole food plant based) diet for a couple of years now, and recommend it for general good health. We have been trained for decades to believe animal protein is essential to good health, not true in my opinion. There are a couple of good books out there that explains the WFPB diet very well, "How Not to Die" and "The China Study". Also a good documentary is "The Game Changers" on Netflix. Bill

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@poodledoc Yes, that is a good documentary. My son Pete (age 42) recommended it to me to watch. He and his lovely Portuguese wife do only plant based and feel quite well on it. My son is a prime candidate for MAC due to having had chest surgery at age three (pectus excavatum )and chronic sinus infections. Since going plant based his sinus infections have decreased in amount and severity. He is a math and physics teacher working in an old school building (until Covid19). Plant based is a healthy way to eat! irene5

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@poodledoc

Don, I concur with the gut-lung axis theory. I have been on a WFPB (whole food plant based) diet for a couple of years now, and recommend it for general good health. We have been trained for decades to believe animal protein is essential to good health, not true in my opinion. There are a couple of good books out there that explains the WFPB diet very well, "How Not to Die" and "The China Study". Also a good documentary is "The Game Changers" on Netflix. Bill

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Hi @poodledoc …I am in total agreement with your approach to health and am currently on my 3rd read of The China Study. There is so much good information in that book. For anyone reading this post…I too have had excellent results with my health since transitioning from a vegetarian diet to a vegan diet several years ago. My shortness of breath is barely discernable, mucus is down and I have had no illness or even a cold since embracing a vegan, Whole Food Plant-Based Diet. I must admit the positives from the elimination of dairy and eggs have been very noticeable but the true reason for my change was to do no harm to any living animal. As I look at my cats and dog I know all living creatures deserve compassion….and I could no longer pay for someone else to do carnage.
Anyway, for me….no sugar, a very small amount of oil sourced from avocado or olive, no alcohol, gluten-free and total plant-based. I do cheat and have a little of Amy's gluten-free vegan pizza once a week. Ha! Gotta have some fun!! I have been wanting to tune into the Game Changers and will look that up now at your recommendation. Thank you…Bill!
Kate

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@kathyhg

Would you share your recipe for kimchi and let us know how you manage to eat 2-3 ounces a day? Thanks!

I also try to drink kombucha every day, kefir when I can and I keep a good supply of probiotics capsules to take every day. I’ve basically given up dairy, gluten, sugar and alcohol except for the odd glass of red wine. I was never much of a meat eater so that’s been easy. My beverages of choice have become filtered water with apple cider vinegar and/or tea made from fresh lemon juice and ginger root.

Since this is a thread on diet, I won’t even start on other ways I’ve changed my life since I decided to try to take control of my “recovery”. Thanks again to everyone on this forum for all the helpful information that has enabled me to do this.

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Thanks Kahyhg for asking my questions re Kimchi! Is having bronchiectasis your primary motivator for the diet you speak of?

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Bronchiecstasis and MAC. I’ve just ordered the books mentioned in an earlier post too. I’ll see if I can try a vegan diet or start on that road.
Thanks

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Some dairy is actually beneficial. Most of the organic cheeses are "raw" or "unpasteurized". This is different or safer somehow than raw milk but still contains all of the lung benefits of raw dairy. Also organic whey protein powder is one of the best food sources of glutathione. Glutathione is something I learned about in this group as being a powerhouse for the lungs.

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@kathyhg

Bronchiecstasis and MAC. I’ve just ordered the books mentioned in an earlier post too. I’ll see if I can try a vegan diet or start on that road.
Thanks

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What is MAC?

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