Share this:
MENTOR
Errol, Volunteer Mentor
@duvie

Posts: 83
Joined: Nov 18, 2012

The Use of a Trilogy Machine

Posted by @duvie, Fri, Mar 2 3:29pm

Hello Everyone, Pt diagnosed with COPD and congestive heart failure this time last year. Has been readmitted 1/19/18 to 1/31/18 out for about 2 weeks and admitted again for 4 days for shortness of breath and slight fever. Went to the PCP Tues. for follow-up and there was talk of placing her on a triolgy machine. She currently uses an oxygen cannula during the day and a Bipap at night.

My questions are;
1)…Is this almost the same as a Bipap?
2)…How is it different?
3)…Do they prescribe this for end stage COPD?
4)…Does the use of a Triolgy machine mean permanent use?
5)…What are the pros and cons of use?
6)…How do patients feel about use it?
7)…Any questions to ask the pulmonary Dr next Friday?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

REPLY

Duvie… I just googled "triology machine"…. I believe you can both expand your knowledge, but also answer some of your questions. https://aeroflowinc.com › Respiratory Equipment https://aeroflowinc.com/respiratory/trilogy-ventilator/

I'm tagging @Liebchen50 @robertjr @ppeschke and @desirea on this discussion to see if they have any experience with a Trilogy ventilator for lung issues.

No none at all .. as a matter of fact when i read it i had to go on google to look it up..

I am sorry @colleenyoung but I have no knowledge of the Trilogy ventilator.

Hello Everyone,
Perhaps we can all learn together in case someone else could use some info on possible benefits of using a Trilogy machine.

The Trilogy machine, after approval, was started in 2009. From members of another site, the Trilogy machine is much like a Bipap but can be more finely calibrated and adjusted to meet individual needs. Where as, a Bipap can be set at two separate flow rates, the Trilogy not only can be set at two separate flow rates but can also sense a person's breathing difficulties and adjust automatically to that particular patient's needs. It is also equipped with several different alarms so patient or caregiver can be alerted of possible dangers of problems.

I have awaken to find her mask on the floor getting NO oxygen using the Bipap and NO alarm sounding.
There was one member who says he would be dead if not for his Trilogy machine. He says, when he falls to sleep his BPM rate drops then breathing stops. The Trilogy machine detects this automatically and starts filling his lungs with air.

According to Respironics can be used for many different diseases and conditions including COPD. It is a ventilator and can be used with a trach or a mask.
With more sophisticated technology also comes more expensive costs. I've seen prices for a unit from over $17,000 to just over $100. Supposedly some insurances pay most of it, if not all the cost. Some have a co-pay that can vary in monthly prices.

Tomorrow we have a visit with her Pulmonary Dr. Don't now yet if the PCP has spoken to him in regards to a Trilogy machine or not.
Guess we will find out tomorrow.

Thanks to all for their comments and a special thanks to @waterboy for posting the links.

I'd like to also mention that the Trilogy machine has a 3 hr internal battery and a 3 hr pull out battery making it easy to use while on the go.
Our Bipap unit has NO battery backup at all. Being concerned for patients safety with all the bad weather conditions, having a battery backup makes it easier to evacuate if necessary in emergencies.

This is just to inform members of the availability of a Trilogy machine for pulmonary uses along with some info I've found out so far.
I am in no way implying that anyone should switch to a Trilogy machine.without first checking with their pulmonary team.
I'm sure with each new device there are also unknown risks. So far, I don't know of any of the possible risks that may possibly be involved with a Trilogy machine.

Wishing Everyone the Best Breathing

@duvie

Hello Everyone,
Perhaps we can all learn together in case someone else could use some info on possible benefits of using a Trilogy machine.

The Trilogy machine, after approval, was started in 2009. From members of another site, the Trilogy machine is much like a Bipap but can be more finely calibrated and adjusted to meet individual needs. Where as, a Bipap can be set at two separate flow rates, the Trilogy not only can be set at two separate flow rates but can also sense a person's breathing difficulties and adjust automatically to that particular patient's needs. It is also equipped with several different alarms so patient or caregiver can be alerted of possible dangers of problems.

I have awaken to find her mask on the floor getting NO oxygen using the Bipap and NO alarm sounding.
There was one member who says he would be dead if not for his Trilogy machine. He says, when he falls to sleep his BPM rate drops then breathing stops. The Trilogy machine detects this automatically and starts filling his lungs with air.

According to Respironics can be used for many different diseases and conditions including COPD. It is a ventilator and can be used with a trach or a mask.
With more sophisticated technology also comes more expensive costs. I've seen prices for a unit from over $17,000 to just over $100. Supposedly some insurances pay most of it, if not all the cost. Some have a co-pay that can vary in monthly prices.

Tomorrow we have a visit with her Pulmonary Dr. Don't now yet if the PCP has spoken to him in regards to a Trilogy machine or not.
Guess we will find out tomorrow.

Thanks to all for their comments and a special thanks to @waterboy for posting the links.

Jump to this post

Thank you for the information. I need to check this out. I've had a portable O2 concentrator since 2011 – OXUS Plus by drive and having a 3+ hour battery allows for freedom from the cord (the other cord that is:) ) . The Trilogy machine sounds very interesting and as my COPD progress I may need to switch over. When I see my Pulmonary Dr I will ask him about it and his opinion. I let everyone know what he says and what I discover. I'm also interested if Medicare covers the cost or a percentage.,

Sorry took so long to write in.Been in hos.with ankle surgery.Trilogy sounds like portable bipap with battery.useing mask seems ok ,but putting tube in me by someone other than nurse or doctormames me nervous,i ve been on ve tillator 5times.All at hospital.Infuture i most likely will need a trilogy,close toend stage now but right now bipap helps alot and can use during days..

I have been on 24 hr oxygen and bi pap at night. After numerous wild ambulance rides to the hospital in the last few months, my pulmonologist is now planning me on the trilogy next week. I have co2 retention with my copd which goes over 100 and shifts down breathing, heart and kidneys. I will let you all know after I get fitted next week

I started using a trillogy machine about two weeks ago passively with a mask as I have End Stage COPD being clusticforbic (sp) I have problem with the mask at time. But my question is this if this helps you breathe and helps reduce your trapped carbon dioxide from your lungs don't you just reinhale it the next breath you take. Where does the expelled carbon dioxide go if your wearing your mask like you should

Hi @brucerhowell. Welcome to Connect!

I don’t use the a breathing device myself, but I understand that the air exchange of the Trilogy machine works on a similar principle as BiPAP technology. The machines are equipped with an exhalation device or non rebreather valve that gets rid of the carbon dioxide. This study shows that that some CO2 rebreathing may occur, the amount depends on the exhalation aid used with the machine.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7697242

Bruce, this sounds like it would be a good question to talk to your pulmonary specialist about and make sure the device fits and works properly for you.

I’d be interested in hearing the experiences of @dawn_giacabazi @duvie and @waterboy about minimizing the rebreathing of carbon dioxide with the Triology or BiPAB machines.

Bruce, you also mentioned problems with the mask. Can you explain further? Is it uncomfortable?”

@ethanmcconkey , I was just told today that the Pulm. Dr. wants me to try the trilogy machine to help blow off my carbon dioxide in my severe COPD/ ILD Respiratory Bronchiolitis. We are pretty much maxed out on medications and nebulizer meds. I never heard of this machine and am doing some research on it. I have seen CPap and Bipap machines, but this is new to me. Is this new machine a lot better than those? It is more beneficial or does it just depend on your diagnosis? I am already on O2 24-7 and have "flare ups" way too often now. Also have several different other problems such as an ASD, and PH. Thank you for any information you may give me.

@sulaha143

@ethanmcconkey , I was just told today that the Pulm. Dr. wants me to try the trilogy machine to help blow off my carbon dioxide in my severe COPD/ ILD Respiratory Bronchiolitis. We are pretty much maxed out on medications and nebulizer meds. I never heard of this machine and am doing some research on it. I have seen CPap and Bipap machines, but this is new to me. Is this new machine a lot better than those? It is more beneficial or does it just depend on your diagnosis? I am already on O2 24-7 and have "flare ups" way too often now. Also have several different other problems such as an ASD, and PH. Thank you for any information you may give me.

Jump to this post

I’ve never herd of this Machine I use my Cpap 10-12 Hours a day! Thanks I see my Dr on Tuesday!

@johnbuckler

I’ve never herd of this Machine I use my Cpap 10-12 Hours a day! Thanks I see my Dr on Tuesday!

Jump to this post

Thank you for replying to me, @johnbuckler . As I am seeing it, I guess it is similar to a BiPap. Still researching it.

@sulaha143

Thank you for replying to me, @johnbuckler . As I am seeing it, I guess it is similar to a BiPap. Still researching it.

Jump to this post

Hi @sulaha143 I personally do not use the machine but from what I have understood in my research is that it works similar to a bipap machine. You can find some information on how bipap machines work in the study that I mentioned in my previous post.
Here's a link to that study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7697242

Also due to the research from @duvie as you can see above, the Trilogy machine has various benefits:
– It's portable
– Has the ability to be calibrated more exact than a bipap machine
– Adjust to your breathing
The full post containing this information is at this link, also note the post below it for more information: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/the-use-of-a-triolgy-machine/?pg=1#comment-95147

As for you, what information have you found? Also, you mentioned you have flare up way to often, how often are they?

Please login or register to post a reply.