Heart Palpitations

Posted by mikeyp @mikeyp, Nov 25, 2016

Hi Everyone, whew, where do I start ? I’ve been to 6 cardiologists, ( 2 were electrophysiologists ) over the last 11 months and basically I have them all scratching their heads on why I get REALLY bad heart palps, and I mean BAD ones to where it feels like someone punched you in the chest an hour ago, that’s how it feels if you can imagine having that happen to you and then I get light-headed and disorientated to where I just want to sit and not talk or move for an hour or more until I get back to normal, usually this takes a few hours. Yes I get them THAT bad. I’m hoping that this group can help me because I’m at the end of my rope. One electrophysiologist said what I described to him was ” impossible ” to be happening, I’m really starting to wonder if I was born on another planet, I can’t be the only person in the world with the heart palps that I have.

Mine basically come in two stages, I feel a pressure on the left side of my heart and then a strong thump in the heart itself, this happens within 2 seconds and then it’s gone until the next time, no it doesn’t happen all day, mine come as fast as they go but when them come it’s like a Mike Tyson punch. I usually get these about once or twice a day. I’ve done every test imaginable, Nuclear Stress Test, Treadmill Stress Test, 2 heart & neck angiograms, 2 twenty four hour Holter Monitors, Echocardiogram, and numerous EKG’s and blood tests and every single test comes back absolutely normal, so ( as one cardiologist put it ) ” If we can’t diagnose what’s wrong we can’t treat it ” That makes sense but I’m still going through this with no new info, no meds, no nothing, I have the same knowledge that I have of whats wrong with me that I did when this all started 11 months ago and that is NOTHING at all, no more knowledge, no meds, nothing.

Here’s more info on me, I ” had ” CLL, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, (13q14 deletion ) they caught it fast and treated it with FCR chemo and within 3 months ( not 6 months which is standard ) I was in full remission, if you don’t understand what this means I’ll just put it this way, if you HAD to get leukemia then this is the one you want to get, it’s the most common and most treatable out of all the leukemia’s and as much as oncologists ” can’t ” say that I’m cured from this they pretty much say ( in your ear ) that you’re cured. Now with that said, every Dr, Oncologist and Cardioligist all agree that this is not the cause of my palps, could it be from the chemo ? Yes possibly but I was diagnosed with CLL in April 2016, the palps started in December 2015 and I did the chemo in May 2016 so you see it doesn’t match up.

The ONLY relief I get from the palps is when I take Magnesium Citrate, I tried Magnesium Taurate ( which they say is more for the heart ) but I’ve noticed that the Citrate works a lot better. Ok so you’re saying why are you on here then, just take the Mag.Citrate right ? Well there’s a problem, when you take Mag.Citrate on a regular basis you literally have to run to the restroom like 10 to 15 times a day, and when I say run I mean RUN !!!!! From what my last cardiologist said ” They give Mag Citrate to people who are about to have a colonoscopy to clean them out ” and trust me I believe him. So my question is does anyone know what else I can do to alleviate these palps without running to the restroom all day long ? My quality of life has sunk, I either have palps so bad that I can’t enjoy life or I’m running to the restroom every half hour, I don’t know which one is worse. I’ve also tried taking potassium and CoQ10, neither works or am I not taking the right dosage ?

Lastly, does anyone have any knowledge of the ” Vagus Nerve ” ? It’s a nerve that pretty much connects your heart to other parts of the body and I’m thinking when the bad palps hit me it’s ” short circuiting ” the Vagus Nerve and that’s what makes me light headed. Any help would be greatly appreciated folks. I’m thinking that with the right supplements I can live with this, but what are the right ones and the right dosage ?

Thanks

Mikey P

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Heart Rhythm Conditions group.

@predictable

@mikeyp, your magnesium deficiency suggests that you might have a kidney problem — or a dysfunctional hormone generator such as thyroid or adrenal gland. You might consider asking a nephrologist and an endocrinologist for their diagnoses. My problem was resolved in that way; I had potassium deficiency that cardiologists, internists, and another nephrologist decided was “essential” and of unknown cause or importance. My second nephrologist cared about finding both primary and secondary causes and enlisted an endocrinologist in the search. Together, they found an inherited kidney dysfunction (Liddle Syndrome) that let the potassium get away but gave lab results of a fake (“pseudo”) hormone condition. My mystery and yours seem familiar, and I hope you find the answer soon.

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You know you really have me thinking that because my kidney stones were so small ( I had 6 in my left and 5 in my right kidneys ) and the Urologist wanted them to pass on their own ( and they didn’t ) back in June that now I may have even more stones and they are really irritating my kidneys to the point to where they’re not functioning correctly. Every day I have ” discomfort ” in my kidneys and I told my cardiologist AND primary care Dr. and both of them dismissed it as any crucial, great Dr.’s huh ? Yes I will definitely ask that a Nephrologist is brought on board. I really want to thank you, I looked up hyperkalemia and now all of these pieces of the puzzle are starting to come together.

Thanks a lot Predictable

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@predictable

@mikeyp, your magnesium deficiency suggests that you might have a kidney problem — or a dysfunctional hormone generator such as thyroid or adrenal gland. You might consider asking a nephrologist and an endocrinologist for their diagnoses. My problem was resolved in that way; I had potassium deficiency that cardiologists, internists, and another nephrologist decided was “essential” and of unknown cause or importance. My second nephrologist cared about finding both primary and secondary causes and enlisted an endocrinologist in the search. Together, they found an inherited kidney dysfunction (Liddle Syndrome) that let the potassium get away but gave lab results of a fake (“pseudo”) hormone condition. My mystery and yours seem familiar, and I hope you find the answer soon.

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I get that done by a Hematologist every 3 months because I’m in remission of Leukemia but believe it or not when they do the electrolyte test on your blood they don’t check for Magnesium, so the last time I was there ( Oct. 2016 ) I asked that the next one check my Magnesium levels and so she wrote that in to test for that too. But what I’m wondering is since I’m taking Magnesium now for all this time will the levels show as normal on the next test ?

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@predictable

@mikeyp, your magnesium deficiency suggests that you might have a kidney problem — or a dysfunctional hormone generator such as thyroid or adrenal gland. You might consider asking a nephrologist and an endocrinologist for their diagnoses. My problem was resolved in that way; I had potassium deficiency that cardiologists, internists, and another nephrologist decided was “essential” and of unknown cause or importance. My second nephrologist cared about finding both primary and secondary causes and enlisted an endocrinologist in the search. Together, they found an inherited kidney dysfunction (Liddle Syndrome) that let the potassium get away but gave lab results of a fake (“pseudo”) hormone condition. My mystery and yours seem familiar, and I hope you find the answer soon.

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It may depend on what’s going on in your body. I have Prinzmetal Angina. The more spasms I have the more iron, magnesium and potassium is used. I (like other Prinzmetal patients) have unexplained low iron anemia- my body doesn’t absorb iron so I have iron IV’S when it gets low

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@predictable

@mikeyp, your magnesium deficiency suggests that you might have a kidney problem — or a dysfunctional hormone generator such as thyroid or adrenal gland. You might consider asking a nephrologist and an endocrinologist for their diagnoses. My problem was resolved in that way; I had potassium deficiency that cardiologists, internists, and another nephrologist decided was “essential” and of unknown cause or importance. My second nephrologist cared about finding both primary and secondary causes and enlisted an endocrinologist in the search. Together, they found an inherited kidney dysfunction (Liddle Syndrome) that let the potassium get away but gave lab results of a fake (“pseudo”) hormone condition. My mystery and yours seem familiar, and I hope you find the answer soon.

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Lisa from what all the tests and Dr.’s are telling me, I’m fine, all tests are normal except that my BUN is somewhat high, that means kidney issues which I do have kidney stones in both kidney’s. From what I’m researching if the kidneys are not functioning properly ( ie the stones ) they can cause the kidneys to not excrete potassium and magnesium properly therefore disrupting the heart rhythms, I’m really starting to think there’s a connection with my kidney issues and my heart palps thanks to Predictable, he’s a member on here also.

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@martishka

Hi Mikeyp,
You say that the doctors cannot find anything wrong even though you have had several tests. I have a question about the two
24 hour Holter monitors that you had. I am assuming that when you were wearing the monitors you did not experience an “episode”
and that your heart was in normal sinus rhythm. I am wondering why you don’t try a two week monitor or month long monitor. I have had both
since my electrophysiologist could not “see” the problem I was describing since I didn’t experience it in the 24 hour period that I was
wearing the Holter Monitor. I had SVT all my life and in my 50’s I developed AF. I am now free of any rate or rhythm problems after a successful PVA (pulmonary vein ablation). I also had a standing order for an EKG so I could walk into a lab or hospital and have an EKG when I was experiencing symptoms. It sounds like your EKG showed no rhythm or rate disturbances. If you get these episodes once or twice a day, I am assuming that when you wore the monitor you could hit the “episode button” and then record your symptoms. Did this happen the two times you wore the monitor? If you were symptom free during those two times, it would seem to make sense to ask for a monitor that you can wear for a week or two to ensure that you can document the problem. What do you think?
Martishka

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Hi, I was told by a health shop proprietor here in Oz that you should always ask for the Magnesium without the oxide ingredient to lessen the likelihood of stomach upsets. Good luck – I haven’t tried it myself as I decided not to take any Magnesium. I am on Rifad, Ethambutol and Clarithromycin for Mac and Sarcoidosis. Jo

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@martishka

Hi Mikeyp,
You say that the doctors cannot find anything wrong even though you have had several tests. I have a question about the two
24 hour Holter monitors that you had. I am assuming that when you were wearing the monitors you did not experience an “episode”
and that your heart was in normal sinus rhythm. I am wondering why you don’t try a two week monitor or month long monitor. I have had both
since my electrophysiologist could not “see” the problem I was describing since I didn’t experience it in the 24 hour period that I was
wearing the Holter Monitor. I had SVT all my life and in my 50’s I developed AF. I am now free of any rate or rhythm problems after a successful PVA (pulmonary vein ablation). I also had a standing order for an EKG so I could walk into a lab or hospital and have an EKG when I was experiencing symptoms. It sounds like your EKG showed no rhythm or rate disturbances. If you get these episodes once or twice a day, I am assuming that when you wore the monitor you could hit the “episode button” and then record your symptoms. Did this happen the two times you wore the monitor? If you were symptom free during those two times, it would seem to make sense to ask for a monitor that you can wear for a week or two to ensure that you can document the problem. What do you think?
Martishka

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Hi Jo,

My Dr.’s can’t put me on any meds because they can’t diagnose why I get these severe palps so I’m basically ” stuck ” using Magnesium, it seems to be the only thing that works, someone said to try the Magnesium Glycinate so I’m going to try that. Also, I have an appointment with my Urologist because due to the kidney stones that I have ( and I have a lot of them ) and my BUN levels higher than normal because of the stones and I think there’s a correlation with my heart not getting the right potassium & magnesium amounts hence giving me these palps.

REPLY
@martishka

Hi Mikeyp,
You say that the doctors cannot find anything wrong even though you have had several tests. I have a question about the two
24 hour Holter monitors that you had. I am assuming that when you were wearing the monitors you did not experience an “episode”
and that your heart was in normal sinus rhythm. I am wondering why you don’t try a two week monitor or month long monitor. I have had both
since my electrophysiologist could not “see” the problem I was describing since I didn’t experience it in the 24 hour period that I was
wearing the Holter Monitor. I had SVT all my life and in my 50’s I developed AF. I am now free of any rate or rhythm problems after a successful PVA (pulmonary vein ablation). I also had a standing order for an EKG so I could walk into a lab or hospital and have an EKG when I was experiencing symptoms. It sounds like your EKG showed no rhythm or rate disturbances. If you get these episodes once or twice a day, I am assuming that when you wore the monitor you could hit the “episode button” and then record your symptoms. Did this happen the two times you wore the monitor? If you were symptom free during those two times, it would seem to make sense to ask for a monitor that you can wear for a week or two to ensure that you can document the problem. What do you think?
Martishka

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Are you in an area with fluoride in the water. It is not only in the water, but in just about every liquid you purchase. It is even in some depression tablets. Check it out

REPLY

@mikeyp, I ran across some added questions to raise with your cardiologist-led medical team. The questions were suggested by a symptom-checker on the WebMD web site. Here’s the extract relating to “aortic dissection” in which the lining of the aorta (or a major artery near the heart or kidneys) separates from the wall of the vessel:

“Virtually everyone who has an aortic dissection experiences pain—typically sudden, excruciating pain, often described as tearing or ripping. Some people may faint as a result of the pain. Most commonly, the pain is felt across the chest but is often also felt in the back between the shoulder blades.

“The distinctive symptoms of an aortic dissection usually make the diagnosis obvious to doctors . . . In about two thirds of people with aortic dissection, pulses in the arms and legs are diminished or absent. Depending on the location of the dissection along the aorta, there may be a difference in blood pressure between the right and left arm. A dissection that is moving backward toward the heart may cause a murmur that can be heard through a stethoscope.

“Chest x-rays are the first step in detecting aortic dissection. X-rays show a widened aorta in 90% of people with symptoms. However, this finding may be due to other disorders. Computed tomography (CT) done after injecting a contrast agent (dye) can quickly and reliably detect aortic dissection and thus is useful in an emergency. Standard or transesophageal echocardiography or magnetic resonance angiography can also reliably detect aortic dissections, even very small ones.”

Have you had 1) transesophageal echocardiography or 2) standard transesophageal echocardioigraphy or 3) magnet resonance angiography (MRA) to check out the major arteries on and around your heart?

REPLY
@predictable

@mikeyp, I ran across some added questions to raise with your cardiologist-led medical team. The questions were suggested by a symptom-checker on the WebMD web site. Here’s the extract relating to “aortic dissection” in which the lining of the aorta (or a major artery near the heart or kidneys) separates from the wall of the vessel:

“Virtually everyone who has an aortic dissection experiences pain—typically sudden, excruciating pain, often described as tearing or ripping. Some people may faint as a result of the pain. Most commonly, the pain is felt across the chest but is often also felt in the back between the shoulder blades.

“The distinctive symptoms of an aortic dissection usually make the diagnosis obvious to doctors . . . In about two thirds of people with aortic dissection, pulses in the arms and legs are diminished or absent. Depending on the location of the dissection along the aorta, there may be a difference in blood pressure between the right and left arm. A dissection that is moving backward toward the heart may cause a murmur that can be heard through a stethoscope.

“Chest x-rays are the first step in detecting aortic dissection. X-rays show a widened aorta in 90% of people with symptoms. However, this finding may be due to other disorders. Computed tomography (CT) done after injecting a contrast agent (dye) can quickly and reliably detect aortic dissection and thus is useful in an emergency. Standard or transesophageal echocardiography or magnetic resonance angiography can also reliably detect aortic dissections, even very small ones.”

Have you had 1) transesophageal echocardiography or 2) standard transesophageal echocardioigraphy or 3) magnet resonance angiography (MRA) to check out the major arteries on and around your heart?

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Hi Predictable,

Yes I’ve had echo cardiograms and 2 CTA’s of my heart and surrounding vessels and up into my neck area, as one cardiologist said ” If all my patients had your heart I’d be out of business ” so I’m still thinking that my kidneys are not producing the adequate Magnesium / Potassium and that’s where this is all stemming from. I mean if 6 cardiologists, numerous tests including blood & electrolyte tests and Xrays can’t find anything wrong then it has to be an imbalance somewhere.

REPLY
@martishka

Hi Mikeyp,
You say that the doctors cannot find anything wrong even though you have had several tests. I have a question about the two
24 hour Holter monitors that you had. I am assuming that when you were wearing the monitors you did not experience an “episode”
and that your heart was in normal sinus rhythm. I am wondering why you don’t try a two week monitor or month long monitor. I have had both
since my electrophysiologist could not “see” the problem I was describing since I didn’t experience it in the 24 hour period that I was
wearing the Holter Monitor. I had SVT all my life and in my 50’s I developed AF. I am now free of any rate or rhythm problems after a successful PVA (pulmonary vein ablation). I also had a standing order for an EKG so I could walk into a lab or hospital and have an EKG when I was experiencing symptoms. It sounds like your EKG showed no rhythm or rate disturbances. If you get these episodes once or twice a day, I am assuming that when you wore the monitor you could hit the “episode button” and then record your symptoms. Did this happen the two times you wore the monitor? If you were symptom free during those two times, it would seem to make sense to ask for a monitor that you can wear for a week or two to ensure that you can document the problem. What do you think?
Martishka

Jump to this post

I’m not sure, but I don’t drink tap water.

REPLY
@predictable

@mikeyp, I ran across some added questions to raise with your cardiologist-led medical team. The questions were suggested by a symptom-checker on the WebMD web site. Here’s the extract relating to “aortic dissection” in which the lining of the aorta (or a major artery near the heart or kidneys) separates from the wall of the vessel:

“Virtually everyone who has an aortic dissection experiences pain—typically sudden, excruciating pain, often described as tearing or ripping. Some people may faint as a result of the pain. Most commonly, the pain is felt across the chest but is often also felt in the back between the shoulder blades.

“The distinctive symptoms of an aortic dissection usually make the diagnosis obvious to doctors . . . In about two thirds of people with aortic dissection, pulses in the arms and legs are diminished or absent. Depending on the location of the dissection along the aorta, there may be a difference in blood pressure between the right and left arm. A dissection that is moving backward toward the heart may cause a murmur that can be heard through a stethoscope.

“Chest x-rays are the first step in detecting aortic dissection. X-rays show a widened aorta in 90% of people with symptoms. However, this finding may be due to other disorders. Computed tomography (CT) done after injecting a contrast agent (dye) can quickly and reliably detect aortic dissection and thus is useful in an emergency. Standard or transesophageal echocardiography or magnetic resonance angiography can also reliably detect aortic dissections, even very small ones.”

Have you had 1) transesophageal echocardiography or 2) standard transesophageal echocardioigraphy or 3) magnet resonance angiography (MRA) to check out the major arteries on and around your heart?

Jump to this post

If you had symptoms from an aortic dissection — you would only have them once — with a very high likelihood of death following.

REPLY
@predictable

@mikeyp, I ran across some added questions to raise with your cardiologist-led medical team. The questions were suggested by a symptom-checker on the WebMD web site. Here’s the extract relating to “aortic dissection” in which the lining of the aorta (or a major artery near the heart or kidneys) separates from the wall of the vessel:

“Virtually everyone who has an aortic dissection experiences pain—typically sudden, excruciating pain, often described as tearing or ripping. Some people may faint as a result of the pain. Most commonly, the pain is felt across the chest but is often also felt in the back between the shoulder blades.

“The distinctive symptoms of an aortic dissection usually make the diagnosis obvious to doctors . . . In about two thirds of people with aortic dissection, pulses in the arms and legs are diminished or absent. Depending on the location of the dissection along the aorta, there may be a difference in blood pressure between the right and left arm. A dissection that is moving backward toward the heart may cause a murmur that can be heard through a stethoscope.

“Chest x-rays are the first step in detecting aortic dissection. X-rays show a widened aorta in 90% of people with symptoms. However, this finding may be due to other disorders. Computed tomography (CT) done after injecting a contrast agent (dye) can quickly and reliably detect aortic dissection and thus is useful in an emergency. Standard or transesophageal echocardiography or magnetic resonance angiography can also reliably detect aortic dissections, even very small ones.”

Have you had 1) transesophageal echocardiography or 2) standard transesophageal echocardioigraphy or 3) magnet resonance angiography (MRA) to check out the major arteries on and around your heart?

Jump to this post

Yes I’m pretty sure I don’t have that Jiggle

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