Adults On The Autism Spectrum

Posted by Mamacita, Alumna Mentor @mamacita, Apr 29, 2018

Maybe you were really shy as a child. Perhaps you took home a huge stack of books from the school library, read them, and returned them the next day. Or did your best friend find you crying in your closet, unable to answer the question “Why?” At any rate, your life could be traced to the Self-Help section of the local bookstore. Unfortunately, most of the books were not much help. ADHD seemed to fit, at times. Your shrink said you might be Bi-Polar, although she wasn’t really certain. All you knew was that you rarely fit in, anywhere. One day at work, it hit you square in the face: I don’t speak these people’s language! Really, it was like you were all playing this game, and everyone knew the rules but you. You couldn’t tell a joke, and you never “got” any joke your co-worker tried to tell you. People started getting annoyed with you, because you had a memory like a steel trap. They didn’t appreciate it when you called them on the carpet. Who knew? This was my life, and worse. I finally aced several tests that pointed me to the answer to my questions. The Autism Spectrum. Guess what? Little kids with Autism grow up to be Adults with Autism. Diagnosed late in life? This is the place for you!

While we were on vacation recently, my youngest daughter and I watched a documentary called the Magic Pill. It features a lovely little girl who is on the Autism Spectrum and also has seizures. While I am in no way at all a nutritional advisor or medical professional, I have to say that I do heartily recommend the dietary changes this film recommends. I personally have seen the benefits in my own life. I have had chronic pain and depression, Fibromyalgia, Degenerative Disc Disease, Spinal Stenosis, to mention a few. At the age of sixty-six, I am in better shape than I have been most of my life. Changes in diet should always be discussed with one's PCP. My family physician is all on board with my decision to stay as low carb as possible. I also have Type Two Diabetes, and this way of eating has helped me weigh the lowest I have weighed since my thirty-two year old was born. The Father in the film has a blog, and I think you can also find him on Facebook. If you or someone you know has problems with sensory overload, meltdowns, communication issues or any other health related issues common to those on the Spectrum, take a look at this documentary. Remember, always continue any medications until your Physician says it's time to back off a bit. Do not self medicate or make drastic changes until you have studied it like your life depends on it. Because it does. Peace and love, MamacitaLucita.

REPLY

Are our comments here visible outside of connect.mayoclinic.org?
In other words, if someone does a Yahoo, Webcrawler, or Google search, will our comments show up?

Thank you.

REPLY

I have noticed that Asperger's, which I have, is something that doctors do not like to talk about. 🙂 I don't know what it feels like to JUST have Asperger's, but I have read that it makes the individual more likely to have other mental illnesses also, and I have them! That's me! Unfortunately! LOL.

Asperger's, along with the other mental illnesses I have, is something that I wouldn't wish on ANY human being. I'll go more in to detail later.

By the way, how come there is not a live chat room here for Mayo patients? It needs to happen!

REPLY

Good questions, @usernameca
Mayo Clinic Connect is a public website. It is discoverable on internet search engines. We made it publicly available for all to help as many people as possible. Because it is a public site, we allow people to register without using their real name if they choose, such as you have. Choosing a picture or using a real name is optional. There is also a private messaging function should members wish to share privately.

You can read more about why and how we moderate Connect (https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/about-connect/tab/moderators/) and the Community Guidelines that help keep the Mayo Clinic Connect community safe, supportive, inclusive, and respectful (https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/about-connect/tab/community-guidelines/).

REPLY
@mamacita

While we were on vacation recently, my youngest daughter and I watched a documentary called the Magic Pill. It features a lovely little girl who is on the Autism Spectrum and also has seizures. While I am in no way at all a nutritional advisor or medical professional, I have to say that I do heartily recommend the dietary changes this film recommends. I personally have seen the benefits in my own life. I have had chronic pain and depression, Fibromyalgia, Degenerative Disc Disease, Spinal Stenosis, to mention a few. At the age of sixty-six, I am in better shape than I have been most of my life. Changes in diet should always be discussed with one's PCP. My family physician is all on board with my decision to stay as low carb as possible. I also have Type Two Diabetes, and this way of eating has helped me weigh the lowest I have weighed since my thirty-two year old was born. The Father in the film has a blog, and I think you can also find him on Facebook. If you or someone you know has problems with sensory overload, meltdowns, communication issues or any other health related issues common to those on the Spectrum, take a look at this documentary. Remember, always continue any medications until your Physician says it's time to back off a bit. Do not self medicate or make drastic changes until you have studied it like your life depends on it. Because it does. Peace and love, MamacitaLucita.

Jump to this post

@mamasitalucita
Such good advice! I am glad that you brought up the healthy eating topic. We can't talk too much about the importance of eating right. I have recently cut down carbs to a bare minimum and feel so, so, so much better. I am borderline diabetic (A1C of only 6) but high carb foods were really doing a number on me and I would feel terrible. While I miss the taste, I'm glad not to have the highs and lows of fatigue and sleepiness that go with too many carbs! Teresa

REPLY
@usernameca

I have noticed that Asperger's, which I have, is something that doctors do not like to talk about. 🙂 I don't know what it feels like to JUST have Asperger's, but I have read that it makes the individual more likely to have other mental illnesses also, and I have them! That's me! Unfortunately! LOL.

Asperger's, along with the other mental illnesses I have, is something that I wouldn't wish on ANY human being. I'll go more in to detail later.

By the way, how come there is not a live chat room here for Mayo patients? It needs to happen!

Jump to this post

Even my precious, kind, intelligent doctor kind of shuffles his feet and stares at the floor. I'm not sure how much he understands about the characteristics of persons on the Autism Spectrum. But he listens to me, and tries his best to help me. By the way, I am not just an Aspie, either. The very fact that we are on the Spectrum hints to me that there are sensitivities and exceptionalities intertwined within our Superpower!!! Thank you for sharing, @usernameca. I would love for you to elaborate on that.

REPLY
@usernameca

I have noticed that Asperger's, which I have, is something that doctors do not like to talk about. 🙂 I don't know what it feels like to JUST have Asperger's, but I have read that it makes the individual more likely to have other mental illnesses also, and I have them! That's me! Unfortunately! LOL.

Asperger's, along with the other mental illnesses I have, is something that I wouldn't wish on ANY human being. I'll go more in to detail later.

By the way, how come there is not a live chat room here for Mayo patients? It needs to happen!

Jump to this post

Doctors don't really like discussing weight loss with their overweight patients. They don't like having to deal with depression in clients who never completely get well. Many dislike having to listen to patients with panic attacks and anxiety in social situations. But here we are. Our conditions are just as real as diabetes and high blood pressure. One day I hope there will no longer be a stigma regarding mental illnesses. No one wakes up one morning and decides to attach to a laundry list of painful symptoms. I went through many different diagnoses before I got the right one. Aspergers. Which went right along with ADHD, Anxiety, and Depression. With this understanding, everything began to make sense.

REPLY
@colleenyoung

Good questions, @usernameca
Mayo Clinic Connect is a public website. It is discoverable on internet search engines. We made it publicly available for all to help as many people as possible. Because it is a public site, we allow people to register without using their real name if they choose, such as you have. Choosing a picture or using a real name is optional. There is also a private messaging function should members wish to share privately.

You can read more about why and how we moderate Connect (https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/about-connect/tab/moderators/) and the Community Guidelines that help keep the Mayo Clinic Connect community safe, supportive, inclusive, and respectful (https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/about-connect/tab/community-guidelines/).

Jump to this post

When I write on here I have a tendency to "change the names to protect the innocent." I think that came from an old TV show… Anyway, I change things around so that most people are not aware of any particular person I am talking about. The information I share here is common knowledge to the people I talk to on social media. What I talk about is meant to help, not harm. I try very hard to be respectful and not share anyone else's story. That is their story to tell. I am here to encourage and lift up. I feel that you can say what you want to here at Mayo Clinic Connect and feel safe doing so.

REPLY

Forgive me for not getting back on here for awhile. I have had an under the weather husband and the situation with the Immigrant Children has me totally floored. Friends on social media have basically gone behind my back to imply that my thoughts are irrational, stupid, and that I just need to shut up. It hurts my soul on so many levels. But at least steps were taken today that hopefully will lessen the suffering of these children. Autistics do feel. We do care. I am not a political person at all. I'm just a person. Hope that more people on the Spectrum will respond. We need to talk.

REPLY

@mamasitalucita

Yes, your statement is not political – just human and caring. I'm sure many of us have heavy hearts as you do. People with Autism do care and do feel for others.

Are there any other groups where you could invite adults on the Spectrum to join this discussion on Connect? I too, would love to have more Members and sharing.

Teresa

REPLY
@hopeful33250

@mamasitalucita

Yes, your statement is not political – just human and caring. I'm sure many of us have heavy hearts as you do. People with Autism do care and do feel for others.

Are there any other groups where you could invite adults on the Spectrum to join this discussion on Connect? I too, would love to have more Members and sharing.

Teresa

Jump to this post

Yes, there are. I will begin today.

REPLY
@hopeful33250

@mamasitalucita

I appreciate your starting this discussion of the Spectrum. This could be very enlightening for many of our adults who have problems that seem to be beyond treatment.

Could you share a bit more about how the Spectrum diagnosis came about? Was it a professional who diagnosed you? If so, what in particular led to this diagnosis?

Once again, when sharing personal experiences on this online community, please feel free to share only as you are comfortable doing so.

Teresa

Jump to this post

greetings and salutations from a 60 year old Autistic my handle are Sir Galahad and I am an Australian.In regards to Autism its a physiological condition which occurs at the end of the 1st trimester of the development of a new Baby. This is when the brain is laid down to change the zygote into a baby and its a genetic condition with the brain being rewired and biochemically different and hormonally different from a Neurotypical.I have recently doing self-observation as a 60-year autistic, I am a biomedical scientist by education and work history As we age the primitive brain is flooded more often by the adrenaline hormone Epinephrine and this increase anxieties and depression in the amygdala and hippocampus. My name is John and I am a friend of Mamamasitalucita. In terms of Empathy, Autistic are extremely empathetic and we do have feelings its due to the bullying intimidation and denigration we revert to our core autistic acts to calm and stabilize us. I am Australian and a senior hospital scientist Westmead children's hospital Sydney Australia .i say good day and greetings and salutations .

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.
  Request Appointment