Adults On The Autism Spectrum

Posted by Mamacita, Volunteer Mentor @mamacita, Apr 29, 2018

Maybe you were really shy as a child. Perhaps you took home a huge stack of books from the school library, read them, and returned them the next day. Or did your best friend find you crying in your closet, unable to answer the question “Why?” At any rate, your life could be traced to the Self-Help section of the local bookstore. Unfortunately, most of the books were not much help. ADHD seemed to fit, at times. Your shrink said you might be Bi-Polar, although she wasn’t really certain. All you knew was that you rarely fit in, anywhere. One day at work, it hit you square in the face: I don’t speak these people’s language! Really, it was like you were all playing this game, and everyone knew the rules but you. You couldn’t tell a joke, and you never “got” any joke your co-worker tried to tell you. People started getting annoyed with you, because you had a memory like a steel trap. They didn’t appreciate it when you called them on the carpet. Who knew? This was my life, and worse. I finally aced several tests that pointed me to the answer to my questions. The Autism Spectrum. Guess what? Little kids with Autism grow up to be Adults with Autism. Diagnosed late in life? This is the place for you!

My IT guy is thirteen and amazing!!!! But he has to complete his assignments!!! LOL

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@mamacita

My IT guy is thirteen and amazing!!!! But he has to complete his assignments!!! LOL

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I really like your post and your IT guy!! When I'm helping people in my day job over the phone and they are computer challenged when I'm trying to get them to locate a setting or specific screen my first question is do you have a computer savvy son, daughter, grandkid that is available? You would be surprised how many folks have family IT guys (and girls!).

John

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@mamacita

My IT guy is thirteen and amazing!!!! But he has to complete his assignments!!! LOL

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@johnbishop , I don't know what I would do without my IT guy. He's been on computers since nursery school. I would have to watch a lot of YouTube videos if I didn't have him. He says he wants to be a veterinarian when he grows up. But he really could do anything. He's been helping Papa take very good care of me since the foot surgery. I'm healing just fine. I've been checking in on different groups, trying not to miss anything. Thanks for the support and encouragement! Talk to you soon

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@mamacita

My IT guy is thirteen and amazing!!!! But he has to complete his assignments!!! LOL

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They are special those IT kids! When my daughter started elementary school I had been letting her play on my old IBM Ambra computer and she was really good on the keyboard. It had Windows 3.1 on it so was really in the early days of the Windows version of the graphical user interface. So when we went to a parent teacher conference at the school the teacher raved how much she knew about computers. She helped the teacher in the schools computer lab – mainly showing the teacher how to use the mouse and keyboard. I got a little chuckle out it. Dad still knows more about computers but it's not even close if we are talking about texting speed. I've never seen thumbs type that fast on a phone.

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@sirgalahad

where dear mama

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Hi @mamacita

I found the website, but couldn't find the article on self care. Teresa

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Teresa, I couldn't find the article on self care either. But I'm not giving up. I'm not used to this itty bitty new phone, and my Grand has to use the PC to finish up some assignments for school. Acck! But I'm going to try my husband's lap top later in the day. Really, I just Googled self care/ how to motivate , or something like that. We'll find it! Self care is the best care!

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@hopeful33250

@mamasitalucita

I appreciate your starting this discussion of the Spectrum. This could be very enlightening for many of our adults who have problems that seem to be beyond treatment.

Could you share a bit more about how the Spectrum diagnosis came about? Was it a professional who diagnosed you? If so, what in particular led to this diagnosis?

Once again, when sharing personal experiences on this online community, please feel free to share only as you are comfortable doing so.

Teresa

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@hopeful33250 , sirgalahad has so much to offer our group. He will be a huge asset to the community. Thank you, for all your encouragement and words of wisdom. Wish you lived down the street from me. You, and all the wonderful folks I have met here. What a blessing you all are!

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@mamacita

Teresa, I couldn't find the article on self care either. But I'm not giving up. I'm not used to this itty bitty new phone, and my Grand has to use the PC to finish up some assignments for school. Acck! But I'm going to try my husband's lap top later in the day. Really, I just Googled self care/ how to motivate , or something like that. We'll find it! Self care is the best care!

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@mamacita Thanks, I'll try to just google it as well! Let me know if you find it first. Teresa

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@mamacita and @hopeful33250 is one of these articles the one you are looking for?

A Review of Self-Help Skills for People with Autism: A Systematic Teaching Approach, by Stephen R. Anderson, Amy L. Jablonski, Marcus L. Thomeer, and Vicki Madaus Knapp
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2854062/

Autism Study Associates Self-Care Skills with Success in Adulthood
https://www.autismspeaks.org/science/science-news/autism-study-associates-self-care-skills-success-adulthood

John

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@johnbishop

@mamacita and @hopeful33250 is one of these articles the one you are looking for?

A Review of Self-Help Skills for People with Autism: A Systematic Teaching Approach, by Stephen R. Anderson, Amy L. Jablonski, Marcus L. Thomeer, and Vicki Madaus Knapp
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2854062/

Autism Study Associates Self-Care Skills with Success in Adulthood
https://www.autismspeaks.org/science/science-news/autism-study-associates-self-care-skills-success-adulthood

John

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@johnbishop Thanks, John. I'm not sure if this is what @mamacita was referring to but they both look good. Thanks for the research. Teresa

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@johnbishop

@mamacita and @hopeful33250 is one of these articles the one you are looking for?

A Review of Self-Help Skills for People with Autism: A Systematic Teaching Approach, by Stephen R. Anderson, Amy L. Jablonski, Marcus L. Thomeer, and Vicki Madaus Knapp
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2854062/

Autism Study Associates Self-Care Skills with Success in Adulthood
https://www.autismspeaks.org/science/science-news/autism-study-associates-self-care-skills-success-adulthood

John

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@johnbishop , this isn't it, but it looks really good. Thanks for your research !

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@johnbishop, Have you ever heard of the term that refers to when an Autie is totally innervated, still, and cannot manage to do a thing? It's not catatonic or coma. The name escapes me. I saw it recently in one of my groups. Guess I will have to go back to those groups and pursue it further. Or, if anyone on here has a clue, please pass it on. I would like for us to address it for a bit. This is something that has to be dealt with on a fairly regular basis. I would appreciate any comments of a respectful nature. I will start by saying that for me, large blocks of unstructured time are ripe for emotional disaster. And guess what today is? Sunday! I have only two or three things at the most that HAVE to be done. So, this morning, I was the poster child for whatever the word is. I sat there on the sofa, waiting for the dark cloud to lift. It didn't. But my husband, God bless him, made a comment about my finishing a project I started. …..a while ago. Well, that made me mad. Doesn't he know how I feel? No, actually, he doesn't. And I'm not going to tell him, either. Not until I figure this out. I did get up off the sofa and worked a lot on several projects. I do feel better. The sun is shining again.

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Hi @mamacita, I'm sorry I'm not familiar with a term that could be used to describe when someone is totally innervated. I can relate to unstructured time through my adult son who lives with us. He is always willing to help me with something around the house or yard as long as I let him know ahead of time so that he can plan for it. He does like his time structured. I did some searching for different terms used with autism but I'm guessing this is more of a term or phrase used by people with autism versus a term describing something about autism? I did find an interesting website with a Glossary of Terms on AutismSpeaks.org.

https://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/video-glossary/glossary-terms

John

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@johnbishop

Hi @mamacita, I'm sorry I'm not familiar with a term that could be used to describe when someone is totally innervated. I can relate to unstructured time through my adult son who lives with us. He is always willing to help me with something around the house or yard as long as I let him know ahead of time so that he can plan for it. He does like his time structured. I did some searching for different terms used with autism but I'm guessing this is more of a term or phrase used by people with autism versus a term describing something about autism? I did find an interesting website with a Glossary of Terms on AutismSpeaks.org.

https://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism/video-glossary/glossary-terms

John

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Thanks, John. I appreciate your help. I will get back on here later when I have asked my groups about the term.

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@mamacita and @johnbishop I googled the terms of innervation and autism and it took me to a list of books regarding Autism. I've listed them below. I'm not sure I completely understand this but it appears to be a neuromuscular problem (?) What do you think?

Secrets to Success for Professionals in the Autism Field: An …

https://books.google.com/books?isbn=1849053707
Gunilla Gerland – 2012 – ‎Preview – ‎More editions
An Insider's Guide to Understanding the Autism Spectrum, the Environment and Your Role Gunilla Gerland … and the feeling of fullness are not quite part of perception, but are controlled by such things as hormones and innervation. … feeling totally lost in the dark, not being able to feel where or how their body is positioned.
Autism Spectrum Disorders – Page 904

https://books.google.com/books?isbn=0195371828
David Amaral, ‎Geraldine Dawson, ‎Daniel Geschwind – 2011 – ‎Preview – ‎More editions
Differential requirement for MuSK and dystroglycan in generating patterns of neuromuscular innervation. Proceedings of the … Totally tubular: the mystery behind function and origin of the brain ventricular system. Bioessays, 31, 446–458.
Body by Darwin: How Evolution Shapes Our Health and Transforms Medicine

https://books.google.com/books?isbn=022605991X
Jeremy Taylor – 2015 – ‎Preview – ‎More editions
In fact, as Jeremy Taylor shows in Body by Darwin, we can trace the roots of many medical conditions through our evolutionary history, revealing what has made us susceptible to certain illnesses and ailments over time and how we can use …
The Neurology of Autism

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