SI Joint injections

Posted by ashby1947 @ashby1947, Fri, Oct 4 8:59am

Does anyone have experience with SI Joint Injections? I have spinal stenosis, osteoarthritis, herniated discs, and 73 years of wear and tear on my back. I usually do pretty well and am able to walk every day and keep up with strengthening and weight bearing exercises. I’ve had an SI injection previously and it helped for quite a while. I’m not sure the “regular” injection will work and wonder what are other options going forward. I have tried to take Tramadol when the pain is really bad; however, it makes me nauseous. Does anyone have a suggestion about other pain meds that are effective but without the side effects? I hope this is a good day for each of you! Sue

Hello @ashby1947, I'd like to invite @sharon2000, @jmweissler, @lastchance33, @scruffy1, @eifeltower, @pines, and @gldnrtrvrlvr who have all discussed SI Joint issues and various routes of addressing the issues. I'd also like the following discussion @jmweissler started on SI Joint Pain and Fusion, https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/sacroilliac-joint-pain-fusion/. Here are a few more discussions you may find valuable based on some of the other diagnoses you shared:

Group > Spine Health > Spinal Stenosis: Relief through exercise > https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/spinal-stenosis-3/
Group > Spine Health > T.E.N.S. for spinal stenosis pain > https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/t-e-n-s-for-spinal-stenosis-pain/
Group > Spine Health > Herniated disc > https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/herniated-disc-1/

@ashby1947, were any other pain alternatives suggested to you? You mentioned you are able to stay up with exercises and strength training, which is great, does that help or does it make your symptoms worse?

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In April of this year I had three injections in the spine. At the time of these injections, I was not able to lay down without extreme pain. Over the next 3 weeks, the pain subsided and I was able to again lay down and start a moderate spine exercise program recommended by a therapist at Dan Abrams Healthy Living Center in Rochester, MN. I have been diagnosed with advanced degenerative osteoarthritis. My spine, neck, shoulder and knees are the principle locations of frequent discomfort. I have had approximately 10 injections over the years. For the spine, I have found tai chi and Qi quong to be helpful. One movement in particular focused on the “posture of infinity”. I do both Tai Chi and Qi Quong daily. The mindfulness exercises in these have helped to pull the my focus to something other than the joint discomfort. I have used Tylenol Arthritis with some help, but don’t like the feeling I get after taking it. Several other prescribed pain meds have also left me feeling worse than without taking them. Currently, Tylenol arthritis is the only one I will take.
Good luck to a fellow 73 year old.

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@mickeyb2

In April of this year I had three injections in the spine. At the time of these injections, I was not able to lay down without extreme pain. Over the next 3 weeks, the pain subsided and I was able to again lay down and start a moderate spine exercise program recommended by a therapist at Dan Abrams Healthy Living Center in Rochester, MN. I have been diagnosed with advanced degenerative osteoarthritis. My spine, neck, shoulder and knees are the principle locations of frequent discomfort. I have had approximately 10 injections over the years. For the spine, I have found tai chi and Qi quong to be helpful. One movement in particular focused on the “posture of infinity”. I do both Tai Chi and Qi Quong daily. The mindfulness exercises in these have helped to pull the my focus to something other than the joint discomfort. I have used Tylenol Arthritis with some help, but don’t like the feeling I get after taking it. Several other prescribed pain meds have also left me feeling worse than without taking them. Currently, Tylenol arthritis is the only one I will take.
Good luck to a fellow 73 year old.

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Hi Mickeyb2 – Thanks for sharing your experiences. I had forgotten about tai chi, but think I'll grab a YouTube and get back into it after my si joint injection on Wednesday. I know being active helps – physically, mentally, and spiritually – but the last few days, I have not been able to do anything other than get around and go to the store. I have always exercised, and at 73, look and feel great…. it's just these annoying issues that I have to deal with! Hope this is a good day for you, Sue

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@ashby1947 I've had three back surgeries and I was scheduled for surgery to have my SI joint screwed to my pelvic bone. This was three years ago and I canceled the surgery the day after I went in for the pre-op. I told them I didn't want to have that done until I can no longer walk. It's a surgery that I've heard so many pros and cons so I'm happy that I didn't follow through with the surgery. My joint slips out and I have a great chiropractor that puts it back in place. I live with back pain every day and standing for long periods or walking any distance bring on more pain. I'm not one to take pain pills and usually only take Advil. I have muscle relaxers from my last surgery that I've taken every couple months, usually after doing too much gardening. The pills are 5 years old and I'm not sure how effective they are. I've done numerous injections and have quit doing those. I could only have 3 a year and they started wearing off after just a couple weeks. I'm 71 and had my first back surgery for a herniated disc when I was 56. The second surgery was to put in rods and screws and the last surgery was to put in a cage at the top of my rods. I can truly relate to what you're going through. Back pain can be so debilitating and I refuse to let it stop me but it sure has slowed me down.

Liked by sue225

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@pines

@ashby1947 I've had three back surgeries and I was scheduled for surgery to have my SI joint screwed to my pelvic bone. This was three years ago and I canceled the surgery the day after I went in for the pre-op. I told them I didn't want to have that done until I can no longer walk. It's a surgery that I've heard so many pros and cons so I'm happy that I didn't follow through with the surgery. My joint slips out and I have a great chiropractor that puts it back in place. I live with back pain every day and standing for long periods or walking any distance bring on more pain. I'm not one to take pain pills and usually only take Advil. I have muscle relaxers from my last surgery that I've taken every couple months, usually after doing too much gardening. The pills are 5 years old and I'm not sure how effective they are. I've done numerous injections and have quit doing those. I could only have 3 a year and they started wearing off after just a couple weeks. I'm 71 and had my first back surgery for a herniated disc when I was 56. The second surgery was to put in rods and screws and the last surgery was to put in a cage at the top of my rods. I can truly relate to what you're going through. Back pain can be so debilitating and I refuse to let it stop me but it sure has slowed me down.

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Hi Pines – You're still doing some gardening! Good for you. I had to give that up years ago and truly miss it. Oh well, we all make adaptations to our activities. I had L4-5 disc removed at 26 when it ruptured. I had pretty good years thereafter with a few exacerbations. I've always been an athlete and have exercised in one form or another daily. Now, it is pretty much just walking; however, I love to walk and it helps to keep my body, mind, and soul nourished. Over the past year, I've gone from a walk of 45 minutes/day to not walking. I hope after the injection tomorrow, I can rebuild my strength and get back to walking. Of course, at this age, we never get back to where we were but rather create a new normal. It is difficult to have such limitations because of my body… it used to do whatever I wanted it to! But I just want to be the best that I can be and gain as much function as possible. So, I, and I think we all, have to be positive and optimistic as we explore what options we have available to us. But we must be vigilant and aggressive with the medical community, because ultimately, we are responsible for ourselves. I hope this is a good day! Sue

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