Spinal stenosis: Relief through exercise

Posted by rayreich3 @rayreich3, Tue, Aug 13 7:15am

Diagnosed with deteriorating discs and stenosis lower back looking for relief through exercise any suggestions?

Liked by sparklegram

Good morning @rayreich3. Your Physical Therapist can give you exercises and/or steer you towards a class that can help. Sometimes, if I'm diligent about it, walking helps me. Regularly working out at the gym helps me, too.

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Hello @rayreich3. I'd like to invite @wilcy, @brendakaye, @rjireland, @ttcase, @zorrospouse, @dorisena, @baxtersmom, and @peggyn to this conversation as they have all discussed spinal stenosis as well and perhaps have found some exercises that help relieve the pain.

@rayreich3, have you met with or asked about meeting with a physical therapist like @sparklegram suggested to get some potential exercises?

Liked by sparklegram

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@JustinMcClanahan

Hello @rayreich3. I'd like to invite @wilcy, @brendakaye, @rjireland, @ttcase, @zorrospouse, @dorisena, @baxtersmom, and @peggyn to this conversation as they have all discussed spinal stenosis as well and perhaps have found some exercises that help relieve the pain.

@rayreich3, have you met with or asked about meeting with a physical therapist like @sparklegram suggested to get some potential exercises?

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I was x-rayed and told I had spinal stenosis and terrible arthritis in my back but nothing was suggested except anti-inflammatories which I took for years but my back only got worse. The doctor said there was nothing I could do, but I stayed active and gardened every year. I did massage and some gym exercise when I could afford it, but gave up in discouragement. Sometimes at the gym I would lie on the floor and cry from the pain. It helped when the trainer pushed my legs with knees bent, pumping the muscles a little at a time and holding the stretch. The massages gave a little temporary relief. When I lost weight from treating the diabetes, that gave some relief. Finally the pain was constant every day and the doctor wanted me to be on addictive pain meds for an entire winter before further evaluation. I couldn't bear that, so I talked my way into a surgeon's office. The surgery was very serious, and I have a metal cage in my back. It was high risk but I had to resort to surgery which took three years for recovery. I can still garden a little and walk short distances. Dorisena

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@JustinMcClanahan

Hello @rayreich3. I'd like to invite @wilcy, @brendakaye, @rjireland, @ttcase, @zorrospouse, @dorisena, @baxtersmom, and @peggyn to this conversation as they have all discussed spinal stenosis as well and perhaps have found some exercises that help relieve the pain.

@rayreich3, have you met with or asked about meeting with a physical therapist like @sparklegram suggested to get some potential exercises?

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I have found gentle yoga type stretches do help greatly, am working with a new therapist who has helped me with balance issues. You might have to look hard to find a therapist who understands chronic spinal conditions rather than a therapist who works mainly with sport and surgical recovery.

Liked by trishanna

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You are correct about the yoga moves, but I got to the point where I could not do them. I learned some years ago when I went annually to a spa which gave wonderful individual help and I also did stretch band exercises and water aerobics. After the surgery I have had balance problems, which makes a problem with falling. I used to be known for my wonderful balance on one foot in the gym, but two knee replacements took that away from me. Once in a while I work on the balance issues, but would do better if I had a partner, trainer, or someone to encourage me. I really like water aerobics if you get an arthritis trained teacher rather than a "Miss Bouncy, Bouncy," as I call the young teachers. The important thing is to just keep at doing something. Dorisena

Liked by lioness

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@JustinMcClanahan

Hello @rayreich3. I'd like to invite @wilcy, @brendakaye, @rjireland, @ttcase, @zorrospouse, @dorisena, @baxtersmom, and @peggyn to this conversation as they have all discussed spinal stenosis as well and perhaps have found some exercises that help relieve the pain.

@rayreich3, have you met with or asked about meeting with a physical therapist like @sparklegram suggested to get some potential exercises?

Jump to this post

Will do thanks Ray

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Walking & stretching help me alot…

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Thanks 🙏

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In reply to @rayreich3 "Thanks 🙏" + (show)
@rayreich3

Thanks 🙏

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One morning last October, I awakened with excruciating pain in my hip and right leg. X-rays, a CT, and an MRI revealed four vertebral fractures (one vertebrae completely compressed, another 50% compressed). The pain manifested in my hip and leg, not in my back. I could barely sleep at night, and could not put any weight on the leg and walk. I have severe osteoporosis, but had not fallen.

Pain pills, lidocaine patches, and in-home physical therapy were prescribed. The myofascial massages given by an excellent physical therapist (three times a week) helped with the pain more than anything else. He also got me going with leg exercises and walking with a walker to get the blood flowing in my legs. I soon took myself off the prescribed pain-killers (which cause constipation), and used only ibuprofen and/or tylenol when absolutely necessary. The massages hurt somewhat, but always made me feel better within 24 hours.

At this time, I walk without the walker except to practice walking for several minutes, I continue the exercises, and rarely use ibu or tylenol. The PT had told me my condition would stabilize, and he was right. I have had other therapists in the past, but some were not very good; so be sure you get one who has extensive knowledge of the body and explains what he/she is doing. My therapist had helped me another time after release from a hospital, so I specifically requested him for this experience. I hope this message is of help to others. God bless all.

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@nancyguy

One morning last October, I awakened with excruciating pain in my hip and right leg. X-rays, a CT, and an MRI revealed four vertebral fractures (one vertebrae completely compressed, another 50% compressed). The pain manifested in my hip and leg, not in my back. I could barely sleep at night, and could not put any weight on the leg and walk. I have severe osteoporosis, but had not fallen.

Pain pills, lidocaine patches, and in-home physical therapy were prescribed. The myofascial massages given by an excellent physical therapist (three times a week) helped with the pain more than anything else. He also got me going with leg exercises and walking with a walker to get the blood flowing in my legs. I soon took myself off the prescribed pain-killers (which cause constipation), and used only ibuprofen and/or tylenol when absolutely necessary. The massages hurt somewhat, but always made me feel better within 24 hours.

At this time, I walk without the walker except to practice walking for several minutes, I continue the exercises, and rarely use ibu or tylenol. The PT had told me my condition would stabilize, and he was right. I have had other therapists in the past, but some were not very good; so be sure you get one who has extensive knowledge of the body and explains what he/she is doing. My therapist had helped me another time after release from a hospital, so I specifically requested him for this experience. I hope this message is of help to others. God bless all.

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P.S. I also have spinal stenosis.

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@rayreich3. Have to agree with nancyguy. I have degenerative stenosis with pain in my legs. Without my award-winning physical therapist, I'd be walking at the very least with a cane. She has overridden doctor's diagnosis and been correct. I also would urge you to avoid those therapists who specialize in sports injuries.

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Hi who and where isYour award-winning physical therapist? I am in New York City

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My resume: s-curve scoliosis, severe, stenosis, spondylolisthesis, RA-like arthritis, and fibromyalgia. And a few I'm forgetting. I had been relying on ice, heat, non-narcotic pain relievers, and body movement of my own design (gentle stretching, range of motion, constant repositioning). I'm a nurse. What I discovered a few months ago is the value of a good physical therapist. She has helped me gradually improve three key areas: balance, flexibility, and strength. My pain has decreased and I credit PT for this. Caution: A person can't just show up for the sessions – I did that a little bit. Doing the recommended exercises at home, consistently, and communicating what's working and not working, is what works. (I do only about 15 minutes of exercising every day – it's not a big deal).

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I definitely agree that I should have done more physical therapy years ago with the right person but instead I went to a massage therapist once a week and also some weight lifting in that gym which was all I could afford. Perhaps I should have been going three times a week, but the distance traveled and the cost and the time involved were prohibitive. My doctor didn't recommend anything but the prescription which did little for me after a few years. When I managed to lose some weight that always helped, but the two knee replacements slowed down any hope of big improvement in my back. I lasted longer than anyone thought I could with the pain, and managed to keep up the gardening until this disastrous year. Yes, I recommend the therapy above everything else and I would add working on reduction in stress which happened after my husband died. You definitely need a teammate or supporter to make better progress.
Being alone is very difficult for everyone except the tough and independent type. My grandchildren are amazed at what I can think and do compared to others my age. That encourages me more than anything. So I amaze them with my mending skills and bake treats which they like that aren't so fattening.
Three of them call me or check in on me every week and I feel good about them seeking little bits of help when they need it. It's a life. Dorisena

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@nancyguy

One morning last October, I awakened with excruciating pain in my hip and right leg. X-rays, a CT, and an MRI revealed four vertebral fractures (one vertebrae completely compressed, another 50% compressed). The pain manifested in my hip and leg, not in my back. I could barely sleep at night, and could not put any weight on the leg and walk. I have severe osteoporosis, but had not fallen.

Pain pills, lidocaine patches, and in-home physical therapy were prescribed. The myofascial massages given by an excellent physical therapist (three times a week) helped with the pain more than anything else. He also got me going with leg exercises and walking with a walker to get the blood flowing in my legs. I soon took myself off the prescribed pain-killers (which cause constipation), and used only ibuprofen and/or tylenol when absolutely necessary. The massages hurt somewhat, but always made me feel better within 24 hours.

At this time, I walk without the walker except to practice walking for several minutes, I continue the exercises, and rarely use ibu or tylenol. The PT had told me my condition would stabilize, and he was right. I have had other therapists in the past, but some were not very good; so be sure you get one who has extensive knowledge of the body and explains what he/she is doing. My therapist had helped me another time after release from a hospital, so I specifically requested him for this experience. I hope this message is of help to others. God bless all.

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Hi.
It’s great to hear you have been finding relief in various ways. I’m very happy to hear that your MFR sessions have gone as well as they have. I have tried so many different types of therapies and injections, spinal stimulator etc, and MFR has been the most effective by far in helping with my pain and CRPS issues. The other therapies maybe help for the day at most. MFR has lessened my pain for 4-5 days of the week which I was ecstatic about !!
I have several spinal issues too and have found in the last month or 2 that having MFR sessions with a highly qualified therapist that specializes in this has really helped with my pain and movement in general. It’s not a quick fix so sticking to it is the best therapy. I have been going once a week, but am trying a 2nd session Friday in the same week to see how much/ if any/ additional relief I get that lasts.
I’ll keep you posted. Mitch

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