Prognosis: What does chronic mean?

Posted by tinadish @tinadish, Dec 3, 2018

@lisalucier Do you know what the word chronic means with a diagnosis of chronic cerebral small vessel ischemic disease? I thought I was a young 59-year-old, but this year I feel like I have aged a lot. Problems with balance, memory, spelling, strange body sensations etc. My neurologist doesn’t seem to explain things very well to me. Or maybe it’s just me. I also have PTSD, major recovery and depressive disorder, and anxiety. All seem to be getting worse. I need some answers and advice. Please help

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Stroke & Cerebrovascular Diseases Support Group.

I thought I would reply since you have not gotten an answer. Chronic simply means ongoing. It is not something that comes and then disappears.

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@johnhans

I thought I would reply since you have not gotten an answer. Chronic simply means ongoing. It is not something that comes and then disappears.

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Thank you for the reply @johnhans

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Hi, @tinadish – welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. That is tough to feel that you have aged a lot from your condition.

I wanted to recommend a couple Connect groups in addition to the Brain & Nervous system one in which you posted, based on your mention of PTSD, major recovery and depressive disorder, and anxiety:

– Mental Health group https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/mental-health/

– Depression & Anxiety group https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/depression-anxiety/ (these topics were large enough that we created a group just on these two mental health topics)

If you go to the group pages here, you might scroll down through the discussions and see if there are any that might interest you for reading or posting.

Are you now taking medication for the symptoms you mentioned, like problems with balance, memory, spelling, strange body sensations?

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@lisalucier

Hi, @tinadish – welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. That is tough to feel that you have aged a lot from your condition.

I wanted to recommend a couple Connect groups in addition to the Brain & Nervous system one in which you posted, based on your mention of PTSD, major recovery and depressive disorder, and anxiety:

– Mental Health group https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/mental-health/

– Depression & Anxiety group https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/depression-anxiety/ (these topics were large enough that we created a group just on these two mental health topics)

If you go to the group pages here, you might scroll down through the discussions and see if there are any that might interest you for reading or posting.

Are you now taking medication for the symptoms you mentioned, like problems with balance, memory, spelling, strange body sensations?

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@lisalucier I was advised by my neurologist to take an 81 mg aspirin every day, take blood pressure med., eat healthy and exercise everyday for 30 minutes. I am also going to physical therapy for left side weakness. Is this all I can do?? Doesn’t help with memory, weird body sensations or driving or for finding my words or confusion. Will this lead to demitasse? She didn’t address that. Thanks for any info.

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@tinadish

@lisalucier I was advised by my neurologist to take an 81 mg aspirin every day, take blood pressure med., eat healthy and exercise everyday for 30 minutes. I am also going to physical therapy for left side weakness. Is this all I can do?? Doesn’t help with memory, weird body sensations or driving or for finding my words or confusion. Will this lead to demitasse? She didn’t address that. Thanks for any info.

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@lisalucier I meant Demetis…..

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@tinadish

@lisalucier I meant Demetis…..

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Hi, @tinadish – I'm understanding that your doctor has you taking 81 mg aspirin and blood pressure meds as well as exercise daily, plus do PT and eat healthy for your chronic cerebral small vessel ischemic disease. Yet, you are still noting memory issues, weird body sensations, issues finding words and confusion. Is this correct?

While I am not a medical professional and cannot offer medical advice, I can connect you to some others who may have some input for you, like @hopeful33250 @jenniferhunter and @johnbishop.

Have you had the opportunity to talk to the nursing staff or send an electronic portal message to your doctor/his office about your concerns about these remaining symptoms and how they will be addressed, and any possibilities of where they may lead?

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Hello @tinadish, I was not familiar chronic cerebral small vessel ischemic disease but I did a search and found an article that I hope may be helpful.

Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: What to Know & What to Do
https://betterhealthwhileaging.net/cerebral-small-vessel-disease/

I agree with @lisalucier that I would talk with your nursing staff to see if they can help.

John

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@lisalucier

Hi, @tinadish – I'm understanding that your doctor has you taking 81 mg aspirin and blood pressure meds as well as exercise daily, plus do PT and eat healthy for your chronic cerebral small vessel ischemic disease. Yet, you are still noting memory issues, weird body sensations, issues finding words and confusion. Is this correct?

While I am not a medical professional and cannot offer medical advice, I can connect you to some others who may have some input for you, like @hopeful33250 @jenniferhunter and @johnbishop.

Have you had the opportunity to talk to the nursing staff or send an electronic portal message to your doctor/his office about your concerns about these remaining symptoms and how they will be addressed, and any possibilities of where they may lead?

Jump to this post

@lisalucier Thank you for your reply.

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Hi @tinadish

Here is the Webster definition for the word, "chronic": "continuing or occurring again and again for a long time." So a chronic condition is something that will be with you for a longer time than an "acute disorder" like appendicitis where surgery will cure you from the appendicitis. Therefore, chronic disorders need time to adjust to and the realization that this will be with you for an extended period of time.

@tinadish, It sounds like you are doing some wonderful things: the meds, the PT, the daily exercise, the healthy eating are all just great! Remember it may take some time to notice improvements, if they are going to occur. Until then, you may have to adapt to a poorer memory by making "to-do" lists, posting reminders on your phone, your calendar or on post-it-notes. Continue to work on PT exercises to strengthen the left side of your body. If need be, use assistive devices (walkers, canes, etc.) to help you not fall when you have balance problems and you are in areas where falling might occur.

In addition, ALWAYS remember that it is your right to get a second opinion if you have concerns that your current medical team are not addressing to your satisfaction.

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