Post-Intensive Care Syndrome (PICS) - Let's talk

Have you heard of Post-Intensive Care Syndrome? Sometimes it’s called post ICU syndrome or PICS. PICS is defined as new or worse health problems after critical illness. These problems can affect your mind, body, thoughts, and/or feelings.

On Connect we would like to bring together people who have been affected by critical illness, and hopefully lighten the burden you bear. Patients and family members welcome.

Grab a cup of tea, or beverage of your choice, and let’s chat. Why not start by introducing yourself?

Hello,

I was reading this discussion, and couldn’t help but notice the strength in all the messages, despite your difficult times, struggles and experiences.

I’ve never been in the ICU, but many years ago, I learned that life’s turbulent phases do serve a purpose: they make us stronger, more determined and definitely more patient.
There’s a saying: “A smooth sea never made a skillful mariner…” and I just wanted to say that I see that reflected so often, here on Connect.
Thank you.

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@elizabethbryant

Sending you a big hug. My surgery was in April and I cried for no reason, the drama of it all and more surgery the doc said to come.
Then two weeks before Christmas my husband abandoned He wasn’t up for the situation
as he became confused and we think he had a stroke during my surgery days he won’t eat or drink. I turned to my faith in desperation. By the grace of God I was able not be moved emotionally when I had lunch with him and my grandchildren during Christmas. When you walk through this with the
ones you love, we are blessed. Sharing on this site. “We light each others candle” with hope and helpful medical information.

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Elizabeth I get where you are coming from “I am the same on the inside”
Sometimes I forget (or don’t want to admit) the toll this cancer has taken. I make plans to work in the garden …but my oxygen cord doesn’t reach far…I take off the oxygen (yes I cheat 🙂 and I can’t work very long…but in my head I am still able to do everything I could before. I am still surprised when I look in the mirror and see the oxygen tubing, it is all I see. The point is sometimes we put the burden of what we can or can not do on our selves. We see ourselves as still being 100% and refuse to work with the limitations we have. If we take an honest look at our own lives it is easier for others to see us as we are now. Don’t know if this makes any sense but it is my perspective.

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@hopeful33250

@milindohope83 I also appreciate your kind and compassionate attitude, Anita. There is no doubt in my mind that you bless your patients and their families! Teresa

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Thank you so much, Anita

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@kanaazpereira

Hello,

I was reading this discussion, and couldn’t help but notice the strength in all the messages, despite your difficult times, struggles and experiences.

I’ve never been in the ICU, but many years ago, I learned that life’s turbulent phases do serve a purpose: they make us stronger, more determined and definitely more patient.
There’s a saying: “A smooth sea never made a skillful mariner…” and I just wanted to say that I see that reflected so often, here on Connect.
Thank you.

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I loved your response and well taken!! Anita

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I’m a ICU nurse and this morning as I was looking over protocols for convergence I had a flash back to a code situation that related to the protocol I had been reviewing. Definitely took my breath away for a moment and reminded me PICS affects everyone involved with the patient. Thanks for starting the conversations!

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@heids8390

I’m a ICU nurse and this morning as I was looking over protocols for convergence I had a flash back to a code situation that related to the protocol I had been reviewing. Definitely took my breath away for a moment and reminded me PICS affects everyone involved with the patient. Thanks for starting the conversations!

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@heids8390, Welcome to Connect. And thank you for sharing with us about your flashback incident. In addition to PICS, this demonstrates to me how powerful is the connection between caregiver and patient in the midst of our most critical situations.
Please come back anytime.
For what you do everyday in the ICU, I’m sending you a thank-you and a hug,
Rosemary

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@heids8390

I’m a ICU nurse and this morning as I was looking over protocols for convergence I had a flash back to a code situation that related to the protocol I had been reviewing. Definitely took my breath away for a moment and reminded me PICS affects everyone involved with the patient. Thanks for starting the conversations!

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Thanks for sharing your experience @heids8390. It is a powerful experience in the ICU. And as caregivers in this setting we have somewhat of an immunity to it, yet we are still vulnerable to the effects. It really makes you realize how intensely it can effect our patients and family members who are not at all accustomed to that environment!

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After you or your loved one was transferred out of ICU and no longer considered “critically ill,” what was the one thing that surprised you the most?

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@andreab

After you or your loved one was transferred out of ICU and no longer considered “critically ill,” what was the one thing that surprised you the most?

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What a great question, Annie. @patrassi @lupedelarosa12 @sistergoldenhair @tfcassidy @vivian88 @janicepike @lamborama @contentandwell @coastalgirl and @2011panc I’m wondering if you might like to participate in this discussion about post-intensive care?
Annie asks, “After you or your loved one was transferred out of ICU and no longer considered “critically ill,” what was the one thing that surprised you the most?”

Liked by Annie Johnson

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I guess all the tubes still inserted. But they are extraordinary spectacular at getting you moving, and sitting up, eating, and going to the bathroom / with assistance.

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@janicepike

I guess all the tubes still inserted. But they are extraordinary spectacular at getting you moving, and sitting up, eating, and going to the bathroom / with assistance.

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It always amazes and inspires me to see the strength of people walking the hallways of the hospital with the various poles, tube, wires, etc.! Were you surprised at how much assistance you needed? I often hear from people that they didn’t know they would get so weak so quickly.

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@andreab

After you or your loved one was transferred out of ICU and no longer considered “critically ill,” what was the one thing that surprised you the most?

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When my son was transferred out of ICU , I realized how lucky we were… How thankful we must be… How great were the Mayo doctors and the staff … How my dreams were coming true.

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@colleenyoung I guess I really do not feel qualified to have any helpful input to this. I was in ICU simply because they do that after transplant but it really was not much different from the care I got afterward in the transplant unit. I was just glad to be out of ICU because those rooms did not have bathrooms!
JK

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@andreab yes, I was surprised at feeling as weak as I did and sort of weaving a bit. A couple of rounds around the halls and I was ready to settle back down again. Thankfully things improved quickly though.
JK

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@contentandwell

@colleenyoung I guess I really do not feel qualified to have any helpful input to this. I was in ICU simply because they do that after transplant but it really was not much different from the care I got afterward in the transplant unit. I was just glad to be out of ICU because those rooms did not have bathrooms!
JK

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My son is doing now that he has been home feeling blessed , I hope all is good with you , and thank you

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