Osteoporosis

Posted by grandmabubblestwin @grandmabubblestwin, Nov 11, 2016

I’ve been reading about osteoporosis and this is what I’ve seen so far: An individual builds bone until about age 30 then they begin to lose bone. Osteo meds do not help you build bone, they may actually prevent the natural bone building process but they do help you retain the bone you have but can make bone brittle. Correct?

Liked by jo54, lioness, Leonard

@betterbones

To Beckyc- Yes, as posted on 6/19, I am on a Tymlos– a bone builder– . It is is self- injected, which is not as easy as taking a pill, but not as bad as I had feared. I was quite surprised when, during the education appointment at my doctor's, I did not even feel much of a prick when I watched as I put the needle into my skin. Once you get used to it the injection was not a big deal. The first few times I had, maybe power of suggestion from reading of the bad reactions, a kind of headache for 5 minutes, but that stopped after a few injections. I also started injecting my self while sitting or lying down so I did not have dizziness that I had read about. Both Forteo and Tymlos are PTH (parathyroid hormone) analogs– so some of the initial reaction may be the body adjusting to pth changes. if your own body has a short spike of pth, it does make your heart beat faster. Anyway, my doctor's analysis plus my reading the literature on the positive effects on done density led me to start Tymlos. I am 60, so I want to put more "bone in the bank" now ,starting from a base less-degraded by age. And my worst scores are in the spine, where Tymlos results were greatest. I do also consume calcium and exercise, but the attractive aspect of Forteo/Tymlos is that they do not just stave off loss but have increased bone density. Each person needs to make the positive/negative analysis with their doctor. I have been on Tymlos for 5 months now, and I do not feel much negative at all after injecting. Tymlos is the newer one, does not have to be refrigerated after first use. The needles, same ones apparently used for insulin, are very thin and the abdomen does not have a lot of nerves, so the injections are not for me painful, except twice when I went to far– into muscle not fat. My instructor advised me (depends on one's fleshiness) to grab a pinch of flesh, which reduces liklihood of hitting muscle.
Good luck with whatever you decide. If you do start injecting, I would recommend sitting or lying for 5 min afterward, and giving it a trial for 2 weeks to see if your body adjusts to it. Mine did.

Jump to this post

thanks for sharing. Is this better than Prolia. I have been considering Prolia injection since I was diagnosed with severe osteoporosis 3 months ago after a bad fall and a spinal fracture.

REPLY

My understanding is this…prolia will maintain your bone density, Tymlos will help grow additional bone.

REPLY
@leacy

My understanding is this…prolia will maintain your bone density, Tymlos will help grow additional bone.

Jump to this post

I googled it and don't think it would be something I would want.

REPLY

evysar26- If I were you, I would ask your doctor why she/he selected Prolia. I know that it is a monoclonal antibody, and think it is often prescribed for patients who cannot sit up for 30 minutes or do not tolerate bisphonsphonates. Prolia may be more effective for osteoporosis caused by certain body conditions. Certain drugs have been more effective for the spine, certain for other areas. Prolia I think is given twice a year, whereas Tymlos and Forteo require daily injections. Certain conditions that I do not have would preclude use of Tymlos/Forteo. For me, the opportunity to build not just save bone is made these the PTH analog durgs worth the risks. Seems like most osteo drugs have a long list of side effects. For me, the possible risks of the effects of osteoporosis were worse than the listed possible side effects of Tymlos. In particular, I understand that if ones spine is weakened by osteoporosis, one can get painful compression fractures just by coughing. Friends whose moms (decades older than I am) have osteoporosis in the spine told me that their moms were in great pain. What risks to bear is a personal decision. Luckily, with Tymlos, I have not had the leg pain or other bad side effects mentioned here. I understand that vitamins and exercise have worked for some people; they have not for me staved off bone loss.

REPLY
@betterbones

To Beckyc- Yes, as posted on 6/19, I am on a Tymlos– a bone builder– . It is is self- injected, which is not as easy as taking a pill, but not as bad as I had feared. I was quite surprised when, during the education appointment at my doctor's, I did not even feel much of a prick when I watched as I put the needle into my skin. Once you get used to it the injection was not a big deal. The first few times I had, maybe power of suggestion from reading of the bad reactions, a kind of headache for 5 minutes, but that stopped after a few injections. I also started injecting my self while sitting or lying down so I did not have dizziness that I had read about. Both Forteo and Tymlos are PTH (parathyroid hormone) analogs– so some of the initial reaction may be the body adjusting to pth changes. if your own body has a short spike of pth, it does make your heart beat faster. Anyway, my doctor's analysis plus my reading the literature on the positive effects on done density led me to start Tymlos. I am 60, so I want to put more "bone in the bank" now ,starting from a base less-degraded by age. And my worst scores are in the spine, where Tymlos results were greatest. I do also consume calcium and exercise, but the attractive aspect of Forteo/Tymlos is that they do not just stave off loss but have increased bone density. Each person needs to make the positive/negative analysis with their doctor. I have been on Tymlos for 5 months now, and I do not feel much negative at all after injecting. Tymlos is the newer one, does not have to be refrigerated after first use. The needles, same ones apparently used for insulin, are very thin and the abdomen does not have a lot of nerves, so the injections are not for me painful, except twice when I went to far– into muscle not fat. My instructor advised me (depends on one's fleshiness) to grab a pinch of flesh, which reduces liklihood of hitting muscle.
Good luck with whatever you decide. If you do start injecting, I would recommend sitting or lying for 5 min afterward, and giving it a trial for 2 weeks to see if your body adjusts to it. Mine did.

Jump to this post

Thank you. I am taking Vit D– I drink milk which is fortifed with D, and I use the Costco multivites which have D. My Dr. regularly tests my D level, and while it is normal, it is on the lower end, so I have started taking more. I have not tried magnesium, but I do eat a lot of spinach, which has magnesium. I read on a couple sites, however, that the calcium in spinach is less available to the body because of the oxalic acid spinach contains. I don't know if that is accurate, but I have kept eating it as spinach is an easy to keep around vegetable, and has many other nutrients. Thanks again for your concern.

REPLY
@betterbones

evysar26- If I were you, I would ask your doctor why she/he selected Prolia. I know that it is a monoclonal antibody, and think it is often prescribed for patients who cannot sit up for 30 minutes or do not tolerate bisphonsphonates. Prolia may be more effective for osteoporosis caused by certain body conditions. Certain drugs have been more effective for the spine, certain for other areas. Prolia I think is given twice a year, whereas Tymlos and Forteo require daily injections. Certain conditions that I do not have would preclude use of Tymlos/Forteo. For me, the opportunity to build not just save bone is made these the PTH analog durgs worth the risks. Seems like most osteo drugs have a long list of side effects. For me, the possible risks of the effects of osteoporosis were worse than the listed possible side effects of Tymlos. In particular, I understand that if ones spine is weakened by osteoporosis, one can get painful compression fractures just by coughing. Friends whose moms (decades older than I am) have osteoporosis in the spine told me that their moms were in great pain. What risks to bear is a personal decision. Luckily, with Tymlos, I have not had the leg pain or other bad side effects mentioned here. I understand that vitamins and exercise have worked for some people; they have not for me staved off bone loss.

Jump to this post

Question: is there a difference in Tymlos and forteo ?

REPLY
@betterbones

To Beckyc- Yes, as posted on 6/19, I am on a Tymlos– a bone builder– . It is is self- injected, which is not as easy as taking a pill, but not as bad as I had feared. I was quite surprised when, during the education appointment at my doctor's, I did not even feel much of a prick when I watched as I put the needle into my skin. Once you get used to it the injection was not a big deal. The first few times I had, maybe power of suggestion from reading of the bad reactions, a kind of headache for 5 minutes, but that stopped after a few injections. I also started injecting my self while sitting or lying down so I did not have dizziness that I had read about. Both Forteo and Tymlos are PTH (parathyroid hormone) analogs– so some of the initial reaction may be the body adjusting to pth changes. if your own body has a short spike of pth, it does make your heart beat faster. Anyway, my doctor's analysis plus my reading the literature on the positive effects on done density led me to start Tymlos. I am 60, so I want to put more "bone in the bank" now ,starting from a base less-degraded by age. And my worst scores are in the spine, where Tymlos results were greatest. I do also consume calcium and exercise, but the attractive aspect of Forteo/Tymlos is that they do not just stave off loss but have increased bone density. Each person needs to make the positive/negative analysis with their doctor. I have been on Tymlos for 5 months now, and I do not feel much negative at all after injecting. Tymlos is the newer one, does not have to be refrigerated after first use. The needles, same ones apparently used for insulin, are very thin and the abdomen does not have a lot of nerves, so the injections are not for me painful, except twice when I went to far– into muscle not fat. My instructor advised me (depends on one's fleshiness) to grab a pinch of flesh, which reduces liklihood of hitting muscle.
Good luck with whatever you decide. If you do start injecting, I would recommend sitting or lying for 5 min afterward, and giving it a trial for 2 weeks to see if your body adjusts to it. Mine did.

Jump to this post

@betterbones that's great but our bodies can't make that much of minerals since they aren't p!ant based but minerals from rocks ,seashells and other harder elements so it's important to provide with a good vit-min product like Centrum or 1a day vit-min most foods have what we need but you have to eat a bunch of some of them here,s a good website http://www.nccih.nih.gov search for minerals or put whatever your looking for in search box.

Liked by jmanj

REPLY
@betterbones

evysar26- If I were you, I would ask your doctor why she/he selected Prolia. I know that it is a monoclonal antibody, and think it is often prescribed for patients who cannot sit up for 30 minutes or do not tolerate bisphonsphonates. Prolia may be more effective for osteoporosis caused by certain body conditions. Certain drugs have been more effective for the spine, certain for other areas. Prolia I think is given twice a year, whereas Tymlos and Forteo require daily injections. Certain conditions that I do not have would preclude use of Tymlos/Forteo. For me, the opportunity to build not just save bone is made these the PTH analog durgs worth the risks. Seems like most osteo drugs have a long list of side effects. For me, the possible risks of the effects of osteoporosis were worse than the listed possible side effects of Tymlos. In particular, I understand that if ones spine is weakened by osteoporosis, one can get painful compression fractures just by coughing. Friends whose moms (decades older than I am) have osteoporosis in the spine told me that their moms were in great pain. What risks to bear is a personal decision. Luckily, with Tymlos, I have not had the leg pain or other bad side effects mentioned here. I understand that vitamins and exercise have worked for some people; they have not for me staved off bone loss.

Jump to this post

@beckyc, here is what I found from Mayo Clinic (https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/osteoporosis/in-depth/osteoporosis-treatment/art-20046869):

Teriparatide (Forteo) is typically reserved for men and postmenopausal women who have very low bone density, who have had fractures or whose osteoporosis is caused by steroid medication. Teriparatide has the potential to rebuild bone.

Abaloparatide (Tymlos) is the newest osteoporosis medication. Like teriparatide, it has the potential to rebuild bone. In a research trial comparing these two treatments, abaloparatide appeared to be as effective as teriparatide but was less likely to cause an excess of calcium.

Liked by jmanj

REPLY
@betterbones

evysar26- If I were you, I would ask your doctor why she/he selected Prolia. I know that it is a monoclonal antibody, and think it is often prescribed for patients who cannot sit up for 30 minutes or do not tolerate bisphonsphonates. Prolia may be more effective for osteoporosis caused by certain body conditions. Certain drugs have been more effective for the spine, certain for other areas. Prolia I think is given twice a year, whereas Tymlos and Forteo require daily injections. Certain conditions that I do not have would preclude use of Tymlos/Forteo. For me, the opportunity to build not just save bone is made these the PTH analog durgs worth the risks. Seems like most osteo drugs have a long list of side effects. For me, the possible risks of the effects of osteoporosis were worse than the listed possible side effects of Tymlos. In particular, I understand that if ones spine is weakened by osteoporosis, one can get painful compression fractures just by coughing. Friends whose moms (decades older than I am) have osteoporosis in the spine told me that their moms were in great pain. What risks to bear is a personal decision. Luckily, with Tymlos, I have not had the leg pain or other bad side effects mentioned here. I understand that vitamins and exercise have worked for some people; they have not for me staved off bone loss.

Jump to this post

Thank so much. This helps with decision making. Are the side effects the same in both?

REPLY

beckyc- Yes, I think that the side effects of Forteo and Tymlos are considered the same. Both carry the same restriction not to use more than two years. Both use the same basic mechanism– PTH (parathyroid hormone) analogs. Forteo has been out longer. Tymlos is considered easier to use, because you do not have to keep it in the refrigerator after the first use. Both come in 30 day injector pens. The two-year limit is I think the result of the increased risk of osteosarcoma in a two-year study of rats. You can compare the side effect descriptions in the package inserts, which are online.

Liked by jmanj

REPLY
@betterbones

beckyc- Yes, I think that the side effects of Forteo and Tymlos are considered the same. Both carry the same restriction not to use more than two years. Both use the same basic mechanism– PTH (parathyroid hormone) analogs. Forteo has been out longer. Tymlos is considered easier to use, because you do not have to keep it in the refrigerator after the first use. Both come in 30 day injector pens. The two-year limit is I think the result of the increased risk of osteosarcoma in a two-year study of rats. You can compare the side effect descriptions in the package inserts, which are online.

Jump to this post

Thank you so much. This has helped.

REPLY
@betterbones

To Beckyc- Yes, as posted on 6/19, I am on a Tymlos– a bone builder– . It is is self- injected, which is not as easy as taking a pill, but not as bad as I had feared. I was quite surprised when, during the education appointment at my doctor's, I did not even feel much of a prick when I watched as I put the needle into my skin. Once you get used to it the injection was not a big deal. The first few times I had, maybe power of suggestion from reading of the bad reactions, a kind of headache for 5 minutes, but that stopped after a few injections. I also started injecting my self while sitting or lying down so I did not have dizziness that I had read about. Both Forteo and Tymlos are PTH (parathyroid hormone) analogs– so some of the initial reaction may be the body adjusting to pth changes. if your own body has a short spike of pth, it does make your heart beat faster. Anyway, my doctor's analysis plus my reading the literature on the positive effects on done density led me to start Tymlos. I am 60, so I want to put more "bone in the bank" now ,starting from a base less-degraded by age. And my worst scores are in the spine, where Tymlos results were greatest. I do also consume calcium and exercise, but the attractive aspect of Forteo/Tymlos is that they do not just stave off loss but have increased bone density. Each person needs to make the positive/negative analysis with their doctor. I have been on Tymlos for 5 months now, and I do not feel much negative at all after injecting. Tymlos is the newer one, does not have to be refrigerated after first use. The needles, same ones apparently used for insulin, are very thin and the abdomen does not have a lot of nerves, so the injections are not for me painful, except twice when I went to far– into muscle not fat. My instructor advised me (depends on one's fleshiness) to grab a pinch of flesh, which reduces liklihood of hitting muscle.
Good luck with whatever you decide. If you do start injecting, I would recommend sitting or lying for 5 min afterward, and giving it a trial for 2 weeks to see if your body adjusts to it. Mine did.

Jump to this post

@betterbones You asked me about CB D cream I never got it ,it's been over 2weeks I don't know who did I'm going to call company and tell them I was hoping to try it by now. If @when I get it I,'ll let you know.Linda

REPLY

Good Morning, my understanding is Osteoporosis is only painful if you have a fracture or have curvature of the spine (neck, chest or sacral regions) does anyone know if this is accurate. Anyone have any other pain?
Jake

REPLY
@jakedduck1

Good Morning, my understanding is Osteoporosis is only painful if you have a fracture or have curvature of the spine (neck, chest or sacral regions) does anyone know if this is accurate. Anyone have any other pain?
Jake

Jump to this post

@jakeduck I don't know but my girlfriend has sciolios and does have osteoporosis I have a fractured vertebra and don't before my fracture I had Osteopenia and still do so I don't think fracture has anything to do with osteoporosis.Good question though maybe others can chime in.

REPLY
@leacy

My understanding is this…prolia will maintain your bone density, Tymlos will help grow additional bone.

Jump to this post

I had 7 injections of Prolia beginning in 2012, only 2 years after it was on the market. It did nothing for my Osteopinia. However the horrible side effects have been a living nightmare for me personally. I wish I had researched it before ever taking it. I trusted my doctor. 2015 was my last shot and I am still suffering from the Prolia, the actual drug is denosumab, also marketed a Xgeva for cancer patients. It is a form of chemotherapy. I had a close friend that was given it for cancer. She and I compared our problems for this drug and the were very similar. Joint pains, severe back pains, jaw problems, skin rashes. I just got an injection of cortisone in my hoping it will help my pain. I tell everyone, beware of Prola, it is poison and should be taken off the market. The reviews on it on many sights are really bad. I hope this helps you and other to not go through my suffering from Prolia. Sincerely hope this helps!

REPLY
Please login or register to post a reply.