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grandmabubblestwin
@grandmabubblestwin

Posts: 3
Joined: Nov 11, 2016

Osteoporosis

Posted by @grandmabubblestwin, Nov 11, 2016

I’ve been reading about osteoporosis and this is what I’ve seen so far: An individual builds bone until about age 30 then they begin to lose bone. Osteo meds do not help you build bone, they may actually prevent the natural bone building process but they do help you retain the bone you have but can make bone brittle. Correct?

REPLY

is there a way to reverse bone loss in the normal aging process without meds?

Hello @grandmabubblestwin, and welcome to Connect. Thank you for sharing your concerns about osteoporosis.

While it may not be “reversing” bone loss in the normal aging process, you may find the following post from Mayo Clinic interesting regarding using exercise to strengthen your muscles around your bones to prevent further damage, http://mayocl.in/2fY805R. You may also want to check out the very long discussion taking place in the discussion called “Treating Osteoporosis” here, http://mayocl.in/29cSR8d.

I would like to invite @dolan to this conversation as she recently discussed using osteo meds to build and maintain bone density. I would also like to introduce @jaleen who did a lot of research on osteoporosis medications and may be able to offer some insight.

@grandmabubblestwin, have you been diagnosed with osteoporosis or are you just concerned about getting it?

Not sure but am having yearly Reclast treatment. Also Pilates and pool walking and calcium supplements. Don’t think you can ever restore but help strengthen.

Osteoporosis; of course the Doc says, weight bearing exercise but no, after several years cycling, walking and fitness club, I still lost bone density…. long story. I take Calcium and Vit. D. Further, I have received my first Prolia injection each once every 6-months. We’ll see. Doc said the worse is suffering broken hip. Worse than cancer he said. Thanks for writing grandmabubblestwin.

@JustinMcClanahan

Hello @grandmabubblestwin, and welcome to Connect. Thank you for sharing your concerns about osteoporosis.

While it may not be “reversing” bone loss in the normal aging process, you may find the following post from Mayo Clinic interesting regarding using exercise to strengthen your muscles around your bones to prevent further damage, http://mayocl.in/2fY805R. You may also want to check out the very long discussion taking place in the discussion called “Treating Osteoporosis” here, http://mayocl.in/29cSR8d.

I would like to invite @dolan to this conversation as she recently discussed using osteo meds to build and maintain bone density. I would also like to introduce @jaleen who did a lot of research on osteoporosis medications and may be able to offer some insight.

@grandmabubblestwin, have you been diagnosed with osteoporosis or are you just concerned about getting it?

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I have been diagnosed. What “score” reflects the most bone breakage? i.e. hip, wrist?

@JustinMcClanahan

Hello @grandmabubblestwin, and welcome to Connect. Thank you for sharing your concerns about osteoporosis.

While it may not be “reversing” bone loss in the normal aging process, you may find the following post from Mayo Clinic interesting regarding using exercise to strengthen your muscles around your bones to prevent further damage, http://mayocl.in/2fY805R. You may also want to check out the very long discussion taking place in the discussion called “Treating Osteoporosis” here, http://mayocl.in/29cSR8d.

I would like to invite @dolan to this conversation as she recently discussed using osteo meds to build and maintain bone density. I would also like to introduce @jaleen who did a lot of research on osteoporosis medications and may be able to offer some insight.

@grandmabubblestwin, have you been diagnosed with osteoporosis or are you just concerned about getting it?

Jump to this post

Yes, I have been on Fosmax a few times, 2 years of Forteo (which I had outstanding results in building bone mass), now Prolia. I am on my 3rd year of Prolia. I will not have a DEXA scan until next year to see the results of a 3rd year of Prolia but after 2 I had results and am now osteopenia

I am 65 years old and have Osteoporosis. I was told years ago I had osteopenia but then a Dr. told me I didn’t…so for years I did nothing about my bones. BIG mistake . But I will NOT take the bone medicine. One relative took Fosamax I believe, and broke her femur just walking into the kitchen. My druggist called me to see why I hadn’t refilled my prescription for the fosamax (I decided NOT to take any of it) because it is part of his job. When I told him I had no intentions of taking the medicine he said, “good for you” and told me that his mother developed cancer of the jaw and he believed it was as a result of the medicine. So…I try and add more calcium and vitamin D to my diet and try NOT to fall..don’t know what else I can do 🙁 I know exercise is important but I am recovering from a broken toe. Soon I HOPE!

@lanadee

I am 65 years old and have Osteoporosis. I was told years ago I had osteopenia but then a Dr. told me I didn’t…so for years I did nothing about my bones. BIG mistake . But I will NOT take the bone medicine. One relative took Fosamax I believe, and broke her femur just walking into the kitchen. My druggist called me to see why I hadn’t refilled my prescription for the fosamax (I decided NOT to take any of it) because it is part of his job. When I told him I had no intentions of taking the medicine he said, “good for you” and told me that his mother developed cancer of the jaw and he believed it was as a result of the medicine. So…I try and add more calcium and vitamin D to my diet and try NOT to fall..don’t know what else I can do 🙁 I know exercise is important but I am recovering from a broken toe. Soon I HOPE!

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I’m on a yearly infusion of Reclast. Had one so far. No reaction. Also take Calcium and Vitamin D. Hoping for good results from next scan. No broken bones ever thankfully

@JustinMcClanahan

Hello @grandmabubblestwin, and welcome to Connect. Thank you for sharing your concerns about osteoporosis.

While it may not be “reversing” bone loss in the normal aging process, you may find the following post from Mayo Clinic interesting regarding using exercise to strengthen your muscles around your bones to prevent further damage, http://mayocl.in/2fY805R. You may also want to check out the very long discussion taking place in the discussion called “Treating Osteoporosis” here, http://mayocl.in/29cSR8d.

I would like to invite @dolan to this conversation as she recently discussed using osteo meds to build and maintain bone density. I would also like to introduce @jaleen who did a lot of research on osteoporosis medications and may be able to offer some insight.

@grandmabubblestwin, have you been diagnosed with osteoporosis or are you just concerned about getting it?

Jump to this post

People need to understand that Vitamin D can be hazardous to aging persons. If taken in excess amounts, it sometimes contributes to dizziness or other causes of imbalance resulting in falls and broken bones therefrom. There’s a lot of literature on this from competent halls of medical science. As a general rule, as I understand it, total intake of Vitamin D from all sources (including supplements) should not exceed 4,000 International Units per day when taken daily. Larger doses are sometimes prescribed, but for much longer periods of time, such as 50,000 IU per month. Other factors at work, of course, are calcium and parathyroid hormone. All three of these should be lab tested and explained to you by your MD.

Liked by lanadee

@lanadee

I am 65 years old and have Osteoporosis. I was told years ago I had osteopenia but then a Dr. told me I didn’t…so for years I did nothing about my bones. BIG mistake . But I will NOT take the bone medicine. One relative took Fosamax I believe, and broke her femur just walking into the kitchen. My druggist called me to see why I hadn’t refilled my prescription for the fosamax (I decided NOT to take any of it) because it is part of his job. When I told him I had no intentions of taking the medicine he said, “good for you” and told me that his mother developed cancer of the jaw and he believed it was as a result of the medicine. So…I try and add more calcium and vitamin D to my diet and try NOT to fall..don’t know what else I can do 🙁 I know exercise is important but I am recovering from a broken toe. Soon I HOPE!

Jump to this post

I have stopped taking all osteoporosis drugs too, after using Fosamax several different times over the years. I experienced bad bone pain in my legs and charlie horse type spasms at night while taking Fosamax each time. After the bad reports on osteoporosis drugs by the media in recent years, I won’t be taking them again until something safer and without the side-effects is developed. I do take D3, eat yogurt, walk the tread mill every day for a mile and a half…and like you, try NOT to fall and be careful in activities I do that may pose a risk. Hope the toe injury is healing well and you will soon be able to try some exercises you might like and will be beneficial.

I came to the same conclusion as you, but based on user comments on a variety of sites, including Mayo Clinic Connect. I have not seen any reports in the media that can be called “bad reports” – the ones I’ve read have all said that more women with osteoporosis should be taking these drugs. Could you please tell me where you have seen these “bad reports” types of stories?

Has any one seen reports for Reclast? That’s the yearly infusion I’ve had once. Rescheduled for second one in march. I haven’t seen any bad reports on it

Hi all,
I thought you might appreciate reading the international Clinician’s Guide to Prevention and Treatment of Osteoporosis (2014) found online here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4176573/

The Executive Summary on page 1 provides some information things you have been discussing here like diet, the recommended intake of calcium and vitamin D, weight-bearing exercise, as well as pharmacologic treatment (medication) recommendations.

@jaleen

I came to the same conclusion as you, but based on user comments on a variety of sites, including Mayo Clinic Connect. I have not seen any reports in the media that can be called “bad reports” – the ones I’ve read have all said that more women with osteoporosis should be taking these drugs. Could you please tell me where you have seen these “bad reports” types of stories?

Jump to this post

Colleen and jaleen they are all over. And as I mentioned before, I have two personal examples of very bad side effects. I realize there are lesser “side effects” but I don’t handle medicine well so I don’t plan to find out first hand.

This is from https://www.drugwatch.com/fosamax/side-effects/
Severe Side Effects
According to Merck, a defendant in litigation because of Fosamax, the more severe side effects include broken bones, jawbone deterioration, A probems, low blood calcium, and extreme bone and joint pain.

Femur Fractures
For those taking Fosamax, perhaps the most frustrating side effect is the drug’s propensity to cause fractures of what is one of the strongest bones in the body – the femur. These low-energy fractures, also called stress fractures, often happen when patients least expect it. Some patients reported breaking bones while they were doing normal, everyday tasks such as walking or sitting. Merck said the fractures usually come after weeks or months of groin or hip pain. Researchers are still trying to determine why Fosamax is linked to bone breaks, especially in patients taking the drug for five years or longer. Many scientists theorize the drug shuts down the body’s bone-renewing process and creates more brittle bones.

Dead Jaw Syndrome (Osteonecrosis)
Another alarming side effect of Fosamax is jaw osteonecrosis, also called Dead Jaw Syndrome. This happens when the blood flow to the jawbone, or mandible, is cut off and causes bone death. Usually onset following minor mouth trauma such as dental work, jaw necrosis (cell death) causes an antibiotic-resistant infection and swelling. The infection eventually takes over the tissue and causes bone to die and collapse.

Esophagus Problems
Some Fosamax patients develop irritation, inflammation and bleeding ulcers in the esophagus, which is the tube that connects the mouth to the stomach. In addition, recent studies point to these problems leading to esophageal cancer. Those who have pre-existing known upper gastrointestinal problems, such as Barrett’s esophagus and dysphagia, should not take Fosamax. In some patients, Fosamax leads to esophageal erosion with bleeding and esophageal perforation. Because of these potentially dangerous side effects, Merck recommends that patients sit upright or stand for a full 30 minutes after taking the drug and take it with a full glass of water.

Low Blood Calcium
Also called hypocalcemia, low blood calcium levels can lead to hand and feet spasms, muscle cramps and abdominal cramps. Since bisphosphonates hinder the natural breakdown of bone, less calcium is deposited back into the blood stream. As the tissues and cells get robbed of calcium, patients can suffer from soft bones, nausea, fatigue and muscle weakness. This can also lead to spasmodic movements and seizures.

Musculoskeletal Pain
The FDA has also found that Fosamax patients can develop severe bone, muscle and joint pains within days of starting the drug. For some people, this pain stops almost immediately after discontinuing it. For others, it is ongoing. Even though it is well documented that Fosamax causes pain, some physicians are known to ignore this side effect, instead prescribing painkillers. The FDA has alerted medical professionals about this problem to ensure Fosamax-related pain won’t be overlooked.

Furthermore, I think that you’ll find this page from the National Osteoporosis Foundation useful and relevant to this discussion.
Medication and Treatment Adherence https://www.nof.org/patients/treatment/medicationadherence/

On this page, you’ll find easy-to-understand information written in plain English about:
– Medicines Approved to Prevent and/or Treat Osteoporosis
– Bone Remodeling Cycle
– Response to Treatment
– Monitoring Treatment
– Past Experience and Studies
– How Long to Treat
– Serious Side Effects
– Maximizing Your Treatment
– Taking Medicines Safely

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