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bumble81
@bumble81

Posts: 3
Joined: Feb 22, 2019

Nonspecific interstitial thickening with groundglass opacities

Posted by @bumble81, Sat, Feb 23 11:56am

Recently I was in the ER with chest pain. I have actually been in numerous times with chest pain. My doctor insists I just have panic. This last time I went they did a CT scan of my chest and it showed this Nonspecific interstitial thickening with groundglass opacities. The doctor did not give me any instructions. Said he did not really know what that was and did not think I should do anything about it and that it would not cause my chest pain. Should I get a second opinion?

REPLY

@bumble81 – Good afternoon. I would most certainly get a second opinion. You should know what caused the thickening. It's very scary to have pain when your doctor tells you that it's in your head and not in your chest! Seek out a pulmonologist!

Liked by fracturedd

Bumble81, yes I agree with Merry I think you should get more information about your lung condition and what is causing the pain. See a pulmonologist. Maybe you

Yes, definitely. Read about Hammons-Rich Syndrome. It may not even relate to your condition, but I got it by taking antibiotic Macrobid, had allergic reaction, & almost died. One of the things that happens is the lung tissues (I can’t think of medical term) turn to glass, break & fill up your lungs. It is a rare interstial lung disease. This may not have anything to do with you but I don’t like what your doctor said. God bless you & I hope your new doctor is great!

I have nsip with groundglass also. It is important to find a pulmonologist. This way you could make sure things are not progressing. Also check out some pulmonary rehab breathing exercises, eat healthy, and keep moving. Best.

@fracturedd

I have nsip with groundglass also. It is important to find a pulmonologist. This way you could make sure things are not progressing. Also check out some pulmonary rehab breathing exercises, eat healthy, and keep moving. Best.

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@fracturedd-Hello again- NSIP, Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) is a rare disorder that affects the tissue that surrounds and separates the tiny air sacs of the lungs. These air sacs, called the alveoli, are where the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide takes place between the lungs and the bloodstream. I'm so glad that you found a pulmonologist to diagnose your shortness of breath. What have you done to stop the shortness of breath? Are you one medications?
@cloe001,@bumble81 – Please read this about ground glass : Ground-glass opacity (GGO) is a radiological finding in computed tomography (CT) consisting of a hazy opacity that does not obscure the underlying bronchial structures or pulmonary vessels (1). Pure GGOs are those with no solid components, whereas part-solid GGOs contain both GGO and a solid component. You can look up the different kinds. It's so important that you research your terms and diseases so that you get a full understanding of what you have.Knowledge is power and if you aren't sure of something please don't pass it on.

@merpreb

@fracturedd-Hello again- NSIP, Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) is a rare disorder that affects the tissue that surrounds and separates the tiny air sacs of the lungs. These air sacs, called the alveoli, are where the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide takes place between the lungs and the bloodstream. I'm so glad that you found a pulmonologist to diagnose your shortness of breath. What have you done to stop the shortness of breath? Are you one medications?
@cloe001,@bumble81 – Please read this about ground glass : Ground-glass opacity (GGO) is a radiological finding in computed tomography (CT) consisting of a hazy opacity that does not obscure the underlying bronchial structures or pulmonary vessels (1). Pure GGOs are those with no solid components, whereas part-solid GGOs contain both GGO and a solid component. You can look up the different kinds. It's so important that you research your terms and diseases so that you get a full understanding of what you have.Knowledge is power and if you aren't sure of something please don't pass it on.

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I had juvenile scleroderma that burned out many years ago. I was officially diagnosed with nsip in 2004. At that point the damage was already done. So I do not take any medication for my lungs, I do take vitiman, eat clean,use essential oils to help with breathlessness, and practice yoga. I have ct scans once a year to make sure the disease isn't progressing and do walk tests ever six months. I stopped doing pft's because I they are so uncomfortable for me. I was only at a 30% and my activity level just doesn't match that number. So my advice is early intervention with a great pulmonologist to help prevent any further damage. This is just a nutshell of my experience living with this disease.

@fracturedd– I can understand what you mean by not being comfortable with doing PFT's. I hate them. I don't know anyone who is comfortable with them. But if there is a reason to do them than please don't rule them out. How active are you?

We replaced the pft with the walk test. My oxygen level is good. I check it daily. Usually 98%. I have a physical job. I practice Bikram yoga. I do get out of breath and winded easily. I've started to really listen to my lungs. When I get winded I take a minute. A couple years ago I learned my lesson with pushing myself. Ended up with a pneumothorax and a long painful recovery. Phew that was so scary. Never thought I would recover and here I am back to normal. The human body truly is amazing.

@fracturedd– Excellent O2 level. Mine is usually 98-100%. Good for you, keeping up as much strength as you are able. Slowing down you breathing is the best way to calm down. As you said, you have to listen to your lungs because they can bring you down in a second. What kind of physical work do you do?

Oriental bodywork. Acupunture, massage/tui na, shiatsu, qi-gong.

I also have interstitial lung disease with ground glass opacities. I was diagnosed in March 2018. My pulmonologist said it has caused damage and scarring in my lung tissue. I also have bronchiectasis and mild emphysema. (I have never smoked!) Everyday, 4 times a day, I use my nebulizer with duo neb solution followed by my vest therapy. I also use mucinex a couple times a day to keep secretions thin. I am on oxygen and doing very well with this schedule. My oxygen level stays consistently at 96-98 percent. I also have to go on prednisone occasionally when I have a bronchiectasis flare-up. All in all I am very grateful for all of this, I am doing so much better than 2 years ago and wondering why I had such a hard time breathing!

@loryann1954

I also have interstitial lung disease with ground glass opacities. I was diagnosed in March 2018. My pulmonologist said it has caused damage and scarring in my lung tissue. I also have bronchiectasis and mild emphysema. (I have never smoked!) Everyday, 4 times a day, I use my nebulizer with duo neb solution followed by my vest therapy. I also use mucinex a couple times a day to keep secretions thin. I am on oxygen and doing very well with this schedule. My oxygen level stays consistently at 96-98 percent. I also have to go on prednisone occasionally when I have a bronchiectasis flare-up. All in all I am very grateful for all of this, I am doing so much better than 2 years ago and wondering why I had such a hard time breathing!

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@loryann1954 Hello, I'm happy your breathing better! I am also a non- smoker diagnosed with chronic bronchitis on top of the nsip. I have been on predisone in the past. Thankfully right now I'm doing pretty good. I have coughing attacks a couple times a day and sob, but other then that I can't complain. Sometimes I feel down about my condition, but I really try my hardest to live in the moment. So as of this moment,,, I also feel pretty grateful!!

I guess I forgot to mention the coughing! I have been in the hospital twice since October. My bronchiectasis fareups involve pretty wicked coughing! I cough so hard and so long it gets really hard to breathe. I have passed out from it. The last flare up I coughed so hard I popped blood vessels in my stomach along with tearing muscles. That one also included a visit to the er and a prescription for Percocet! When I get the coughing under control I don’t cough much at all! So I guess part of the reason I don’t dwell on all of that is because I know where I was and this is still sooooo much better! I am so very grateful for that!@fracturedd I wish the best for you in figuring it all out!

@loryann1954 how do you get your coughing under control?

@fracturedd

@loryann1954 how do you get your coughing under control?

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I use a nebulizer 4 times a day regularly and up it to 6 when I cough. I also have an airways clearance vest which follows the nebulizer. It is an InCourage/Respirtech vest if you want to look it up. It explains how it works better than I can. Each session lasts about 45 minutes. With bronchiectasis you need to cough out mucus because you airways no longer do it on their own. So we try to keep the mucus loose and coughable. So this along with mucinex keeps it “moving”. I can have coughing episodes that last 2 weeks. I also tend to cough a little when I get winded. I did just work my way through a flare up without going to the hospital! Yay me!! 🤗 Being on prednisone helps, too. It’s not a nice drug, but it can work. I do a taper dose starting at 45 mg and taper off over about 3 weeks. So, it really does sound like a lot, but for me it’s sll about the mucus. Especially when my lungs are already compromised by the interstitial part of it. Anyway, what I need to do is work, but better than the alternative!

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