Aging and Changing

Posted by bakerwise @bakerwise, Oct 16, 2018

Discussion Group for people frustrated by eating out in public or feeling as if behavior with a diagnosed but not “solved” problem could result in exclusion from their family’s dinner table. Examples: Spontaneous urination and laughter during dinner or tremor that causes food to be pushed off a plate.

@gingerw

@parus @lioness @grandmar @hopeful33250 Each day we have the opportunity to create ourselves. There is a purpose to our lives, even on the day we don't feel like there is. Chronic forgetfulness? Sure, it is there to let us invent ourselves again [that's my story and I'm sticking to it!] The aging process can be a blessing and a curse. How grateful to be alive to feel old! How grateful to feel! Do I recall or mourn the days when stamina seemed endless, well, sometimes. But each day now is more thoughtful, more purposefully spent, as I have accepted that we all have an unknown-to-us expiration date. My goal is to do my best each day, don't compare myself to others, be kind to myself and others, and make a difference.
Ginger

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@ginger thanks ginger well said you lifted my spirits

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@gingerw

@parus @lioness @grandmar @hopeful33250 Each day we have the opportunity to create ourselves. There is a purpose to our lives, even on the day we don't feel like there is. Chronic forgetfulness? Sure, it is there to let us invent ourselves again [that's my story and I'm sticking to it!] The aging process can be a blessing and a curse. How grateful to be alive to feel old! How grateful to feel! Do I recall or mourn the days when stamina seemed endless, well, sometimes. But each day now is more thoughtful, more purposefully spent, as I have accepted that we all have an unknown-to-us expiration date. My goal is to do my best each day, don't compare myself to others, be kind to myself and others, and make a difference.
Ginger

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@gingerw
You must have been a writer and a therapist in one of you lives, if not this one.
I don't know how old you are, but I want to be like you when I grow up (lol…I'm 63).
You are the single most positive person I have read.
There are certainly many in the many groups, but for some reason, I feel like you are looking into my soul and answering the questions I think about (especially when my pain and health….are a pain).
Thank you for posting!!!
Ronnie
(GRANDMAr)

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@parus

Aging has brought about many changes thus causing existing issues to appear and/or become worse. For me acceptance of conditions and now being diagnosed as having disorders, syndromes and chronic conditions may not be designed to encourage me to feel like I am a failure-well, at times it does. I am chronically old what more can I say???!!!!
I can have an attitude and oft feel I am entitled to have thus-I am not. Being chronically old does not suddenly lavish me with rights.
Now where I was heading with this I have no idea-I forgot as I am also chronically forgetful…😉
I can comment that acceptance has been a start. I can also find myself back at the starting line at times and this is okay although I must use caution at to where I admit thus.

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@parus – A relative of mine who was a doctor told me that the "golden" years are not golden at all. Reality is that if you are fortunate enough not to have died young or contracted some chronic disease at an earlier age, it all waits for you in old age. Many people affirm the benefit of acceptance. My instinct tells me to fight and not accept, as much as you can. Did we accept bad things in all the previous years? Bad grades? A bad job? Domestic violence? Not if there is any chance of resisting and not giving in.

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I'm no fighting age, I'm trying to make it work for me. In his book, To Bless the Space Between Us, Irish priest and poet describes age as a time of "gracious harvesting." I'm harvesting the seeds I've sown and continuing to do what I love to do. My 37th book, The Grandma Force, comes out next fall.

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@jshdma

@parus – A relative of mine who was a doctor told me that the "golden" years are not golden at all. Reality is that if you are fortunate enough not to have died young or contracted some chronic disease at an earlier age, it all waits for you in old age. Many people affirm the benefit of acceptance. My instinct tells me to fight and not accept, as much as you can. Did we accept bad things in all the previous years? Bad grades? A bad job? Domestic violence? Not if there is any chance of resisting and not giving in.

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@jshdma I apologize if my accepting sounded like giving up/in. I have accepted there are things I can no longer do. Narian on giving up. I have found new ways to do things as I am not a quitter nor are you. Thank for the opportunity to clarify.

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Thanks Parus. Sounds like you and I are chugging along.

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@harriethodgson1

I'm no fighting age, I'm trying to make it work for me. In his book, To Bless the Space Between Us, Irish priest and poet describes age as a time of "gracious harvesting." I'm harvesting the seeds I've sown and continuing to do what I love to do. My 37th book, The Grandma Force, comes out next fall.

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It strike me that you ARE righting. Accepting would be more like the rocking chair, playing golf or going fishing. But I do disagree with the concept of "gracious harvesting." "Gracious" is for Emily Post, not for accomplishing things.

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@harriethodgson1

Thanks Parus. Sounds like you and I are chugging along.

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@harriethodgson1 Yes we are and thankful to be doing so.

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@parus

@jshdma I apologize if my accepting sounded like giving up/in. I have accepted there are things I can no longer do. Narian on giving up. I have found new ways to do things as I am not a quitter nor are you. Thank for the opportunity to clarify.

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@parus. No apology needed. I am not offended. Being offended is a waste of time anyway.

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@jshdma

It strike me that you ARE righting. Accepting would be more like the rocking chair, playing golf or going fishing. But I do disagree with the concept of "gracious harvesting." "Gracious" is for Emily Post, not for accomplishing things.

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@jshdma You keep that fighting spirit and I do not even own a rocking chair. Who is Emily Post? Is she a contemporary poet?

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@jshdma

@parus – A relative of mine who was a doctor told me that the "golden" years are not golden at all. Reality is that if you are fortunate enough not to have died young or contracted some chronic disease at an earlier age, it all waits for you in old age. Many people affirm the benefit of acceptance. My instinct tells me to fight and not accept, as much as you can. Did we accept bad things in all the previous years? Bad grades? A bad job? Domestic violence? Not if there is any chance of resisting and not giving in.

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@jshdma
Good Morning!
That doctor is something else!
I believe there is a difference between accepting getting older and giving in to getting older.
I accept that I am getting older but I am not giving into it.
I am fighting as hard as possible without going over the edge and doing things that can be harmful to me or others.
Giving into things is not always a bad thing.
Your break a leg and you need to rest your leg. The rest of your body feels great and you want to go out.
You need to give into the fact that if you don't rest your leg, you can develop more issues before doing things before your leg is ready.

Ronnie
GRANDMAr

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@parus

@jshdma You keep that fighting spirit and I do not even own a rocking chair. Who is Emily Post? Is she a contemporary poet?

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@parus Hah! Emily Post wrote a (famous?) book on etiquette / good manners a long time ago, in an age that valued such things. (nothing personal– obviously public manners are completely degraded). I just meant that serious work has little to do with the superficial.

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