Need advice with heart issues

Posted by jadillow @jadillow, Thu, Apr 25 2:49pm

I have posted numerous times and everyone is so friendly and helpful. I have sinus bradycardia and for months I have had many days randomly filled with lightheadedness bouts and pains all in left side (arm, chest, hip, legs). Had stress and Ecco done 4 months ago and many ER visits saying heart was fine. I am now wearing an event monitor to keep checking things. Today for example my resting rate, sitting at my desk my normal job, was in the 40s. Most days it stays in 50s and today I have felt lightheaded air. Even at times feeling my limbs were cool.

I juts needs some advice. I’m 36 with a side and kids and I just want to make sure I am doing all I can to ensure I see them through the years and make sure something’s tragic doesn’t happen to me. Any advice or anything similar from anyone? Thanks a lot for the continued help.

Liked by Dee, Soliloquized

What's the suggested cause of the Bradycardia? Sometimes medications cause it, such as medications used to control the rate in Afib patients, or Certain Blood Pressure medications, etc. What has your doctor told you is the likely cause of your Bradycardia?

Liked by Dee

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@soliloquized

What's the suggested cause of the Bradycardia? Sometimes medications cause it, such as medications used to control the rate in Afib patients, or Certain Blood Pressure medications, etc. What has your doctor told you is the likely cause of your Bradycardia?

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He hasn’t. I take Lisinopril 10mg and have for a few years. Here lately I have began to have a cold feeling In my feet and legs off an on as well

Liked by Soliloquized

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I wish I had some sound knowledge to pass on, but unfortunately I don't. What I DO know is that you are doing the right thing by seeing your cardiologist and working on finding the root cause of the bradycardia. The event monitor is going to give your doctor a lot of information and hopefully, an answer which will lead to a cure or management. I wish you the best outcome. Please keep us posted.

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I just looked up side effects of your Lisinopril and here it is: QUOTE: "ACE inhibitors like lisinopril are used to treat hypertension or high blood pressure and are particularly effective in those people with chronic kidney disease and heart failure. … If taken in excess, however, ACE inhibitors cause hypotension or dangerously low blood pressure and slow your heartbeat (bradycardia), too." So there you go! You are either taking too much of the drug by mistake or it is too strong a dose for you. Talk to your doctor urgently. Of course, you will feel faint with such a low heart rate.

Liked by Soliloquized

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@afrobin

I just looked up side effects of your Lisinopril and here it is: QUOTE: "ACE inhibitors like lisinopril are used to treat hypertension or high blood pressure and are particularly effective in those people with chronic kidney disease and heart failure. … If taken in excess, however, ACE inhibitors cause hypotension or dangerously low blood pressure and slow your heartbeat (bradycardia), too." So there you go! You are either taking too much of the drug by mistake or it is too strong a dose for you. Talk to your doctor urgently. Of course, you will feel faint with such a low heart rate.

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I will speak with him. Thank you

Liked by Soliloquized

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Is it possible that the low heart rate is a good sign if my heart health? That’s what the doctors tell me most of the time. The chest pains I have are sometime in sternum and it does feel like I can recreate the pain by pressing and I believe maybe condritis as at times it feel those ribs are swollen.

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Ask your doctor to lower the dose of your medication. Athletes have slower pulses but not as low as yours. Your pulse is TOO slow. If I were in your shoes I would immediately lower the does myself but most people stay on a drug until they see a doctor. Also, if I were you I would speak to a pharmacist. They studied drugs and their interactions and how they affect the body for at least 4 years in university. Doctors did not.

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@afrobin

Ask your doctor to lower the dose of your medication. Athletes have slower pulses but not as low as yours. Your pulse is TOO slow. If I were in your shoes I would immediately lower the does myself but most people stay on a drug until they see a doctor. Also, if I were you I would speak to a pharmacist. They studied drugs and their interactions and how they affect the body for at least 4 years in university. Doctors did not.

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So should I take 1/2 and try myself ? That would be 5 mg instead of 10

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I'm not a doctor so I would never suggest that you do anything. I just said what I would do. I think you should see your doctor immediately so that you can get the dose adjustment. The squeaky wheel gets the grease. Tell the secretary that it is an urgent situation.

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@jadillow

So should I take 1/2 and try myself ? That would be 5 mg instead of 10

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My wife worked in several Doctor's Offices, Family, Pulmonary, and Cardiac practices. She wants to know if you're in the U.S., it's common to call your Doctor for advice. We keep in touch with ours through a medical insurance provider system, via email, we ask occasional questions, they reply or call, routine test results for Anticoagulation are given via the system, and we respond. The Doctors in our case are affiliated with the insurance provider.

I have Afib. When I was discharged, I was told by a hospital doctor that if my Heart Rate was 45 at rest, and I wasn't symptomatic, not to be concerned. If it was 160 and I wasn't symptomatic – Get to the Emergency Room.

Before the advent of Afib, my heart rate was in the mid 50's at rest. I'd express concern to another cardiologist at the time, he told me they have patients with Heart Rates in the 40s, it's no concern (he said).

I was taking a good amount of another Beta Blocker, after Afib started, and I'm now been taken off the original Beta Blocker and put on a new one, my pulse is 65 or higher.

See your doctor in a timely manner, write down questions that you have, ask him using the list. I often write them up and hand them to the doctor.

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@soliloquized

My wife worked in several Doctor's Offices, Family, Pulmonary, and Cardiac practices. She wants to know if you're in the U.S., it's common to call your Doctor for advice. We keep in touch with ours through a medical insurance provider system, via email, we ask occasional questions, they reply or call, routine test results for Anticoagulation are given via the system, and we respond. The Doctors in our case are affiliated with the insurance provider.

I have Afib. When I was discharged, I was told by a hospital doctor that if my Heart Rate was 45 at rest, and I wasn't symptomatic, not to be concerned. If it was 160 and I wasn't symptomatic – Get to the Emergency Room.

Before the advent of Afib, my heart rate was in the mid 50's at rest. I'd express concern to another cardiologist at the time, he told me they have patients with Heart Rates in the 40s, it's no concern (he said).

I was taking a good amount of another Beta Blocker, after Afib started, and I'm now been taken off the original Beta Blocker and put on a new one, my pulse is 65 or higher.

See your doctor in a timely manner, write down questions that you have, ask him using the list. I often write them up and hand them to the doctor.

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Thanks you all for the responses. My doctor seems to be ok with my heart rate being low. I get lightheaded at times but not always when it’s low. I have a mild pain in my sternum but nothing insane. Just annoying. I believe to be condritis or reflux as I had a scope done they said I had a small hiatal hernia. I’m curious if that could cause some of my chest pains?

I will be done with my event monitor this week so hopefully nothing bad will come from that.

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Ha ha! I do the same; I write down my questions and concerns and make 2 copies; one for myself and one for the doctor. I ask if he or she wants a copy.
I live in Canada. We go to the doctor or hospital; the secretary swipes the medicare card and that's it. Same goes for all procedures like MRIs or having a baby or whatever. As far as calling the doctor with questions; usually one is told to go in for an appointment. But if the question is for clarification and not something new, the doctor may call.
Our system is not functioning that well. Everyone has access to medical care but 1/3 of Montrealers for example, do not have a doctor. So we have to go to a clinic and wait for several hours. If it is something serious, you go to the emergency of a hospital and you are seen immediately. If you go to the hospital with the flu, you may wait for 6 hours because more serious cases come in ahead of you while you wait. Many immigrants go to hospital for minor illnesses.
I got fed up with having to wait for 3 hours to see a doctor (although I have specialists like a urologist and ENT whom I see…with a few weeks wait), and I joined a private clinic. It costs me $500 US per year; not a big deal. The care is same day, no wait and it's thorough. But the government is not that happy with private health care because it creates a 2 tier system; one for the 'rich' and one for everyone else.
I read that Americans spend way more on health care than any other country. I suspect because patients are very litigious in the US so a doctor will order every test in the book to cover his %$#@&. A missed diagnosis can cost the doctor dearly. My friend's mother had a cardiac catheterization but the doctor…and the staff at the hospital FORGOT to check what meds she was on…and one was a blood thinner and she bled to death. There was no lawsuit. I don't know that I would have been so forgiving. If you sue here for medical malpractice, you may get something but not that much. So I think maybe that is why we probably don't go for as many tests although any and all are available at no cost.
Are YOU okay with your heart rate being so low? You say you feel weak or faint. When I was on beta blockers my heart was at 80 bpm whether I was sleeping or on a treadmill.
Ciao for niao! Robin

REPLY
@afrobin

Ha ha! I do the same; I write down my questions and concerns and make 2 copies; one for myself and one for the doctor. I ask if he or she wants a copy.
I live in Canada. We go to the doctor or hospital; the secretary swipes the medicare card and that's it. Same goes for all procedures like MRIs or having a baby or whatever. As far as calling the doctor with questions; usually one is told to go in for an appointment. But if the question is for clarification and not something new, the doctor may call.
Our system is not functioning that well. Everyone has access to medical care but 1/3 of Montrealers for example, do not have a doctor. So we have to go to a clinic and wait for several hours. If it is something serious, you go to the emergency of a hospital and you are seen immediately. If you go to the hospital with the flu, you may wait for 6 hours because more serious cases come in ahead of you while you wait. Many immigrants go to hospital for minor illnesses.
I got fed up with having to wait for 3 hours to see a doctor (although I have specialists like a urologist and ENT whom I see…with a few weeks wait), and I joined a private clinic. It costs me $500 US per year; not a big deal. The care is same day, no wait and it's thorough. But the government is not that happy with private health care because it creates a 2 tier system; one for the 'rich' and one for everyone else.
I read that Americans spend way more on health care than any other country. I suspect because patients are very litigious in the US so a doctor will order every test in the book to cover his %$#@&. A missed diagnosis can cost the doctor dearly. My friend's mother had a cardiac catheterization but the doctor…and the staff at the hospital FORGOT to check what meds she was on…and one was a blood thinner and she bled to death. There was no lawsuit. I don't know that I would have been so forgiving. If you sue here for medical malpractice, you may get something but not that much. So I think maybe that is why we probably don't go for as many tests although any and all are available at no cost.
Are YOU okay with your heart rate being so low? You say you feel weak or faint. When I was on beta blockers my heart was at 80 bpm whether I was sleeping or on a treadmill.
Ciao for niao! Robin

Jump to this post

I feel ok. At times I feel the lightheadedness but that happens even when rate is normal.

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My first question is: Are you taking any medications? That would be my first guess as to what is causing the slow pulse.

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Lisinopril causes bradycardia.. for heaven's sake! Your doctor didn't mention this???

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