Is Afib ever cured?

Posted by elegantgem @elegantgem, Nov 23, 2020

I know this seems like an unlikely question but I wanted to ask people if you can be diagnosed with Afib and then be told you don't have it anymore? I ask because after a heart ablation I thought my afib was gone but it shows itself back up every month or so. So I was wondering if any treatment causes it to disappear.

@yurkosolhan

Hi, is it Tycosin? Simple yes or no. Respectfully and thankfully, gws

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yes

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In reply to @rois4richo "yes" + (show)
@rois4richo

Thank you, and All the Best!

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@mayofeb2020

@fey42. @elegantgem.. Is this cash price? I doubt Canada accepts our Medicare insurance. Last year towards the end of the year I was paying $147 for one month's supply. Totally outrageous.

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It is $100.- Can. For a month supply at present as I use it as well.
Margreet

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@amandaburnett

Hi @svend and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I wanted you to be able to connect with people that have similar questions regarding Afib and blood thinners so you will see that I moved your inquiry to an ongoing discussion that includes several other members. I can tell you that people with prolonged episodes of Afib or frequent episodes, have a much higher risk of heart conditions and/or strokes. So if you have had several, your doctor may want to keep you on them to prevent throwing a clot and having a stroke.
How many episodes have you had since your gall bladder attack?

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I have not had any. Cardiologist felt, that because of my age (80) I would sooner or later have more attacks of afib

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@rois4richo

Hello! I have had a-fib for at least 10 years off and on. I had an ablation in 2013 which proved unsuccessful. I'll make a long story short: Over the past three years, my a-fib became active 24/7. My cardio team at Mayo has worked tirelessly to help me with it. I met with two Electro-Physiologists in Cardiology this February. I spent three days in St. Mary's in Rochester under observation while they prescribed a medication. It worked. I am in normal sinus rhythm. I am not at liberty to tell you the name of the med except to tell you it is expensive and Blue Cross will not pay for it. I'll let your cardio team proceed with the process as it might not be what it indicated for you. All I can say is, I am a happy camper and I can tell the difference. All the best to you.

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I'm in 24/7 atrial fib for at least the last 20 years. Over a period of about 3 years, seven cardioversions failed to keep my heart in sinus rhythm. One ablation failed. After similar episodes you're now in normal sinus rhythm, but you are not at liberty to disclose the medication that you are taking. Why is this a secret? This is very sad and maddening for people such like me.

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@rois4richo

Hello! I have had a-fib for at least 10 years off and on. I had an ablation in 2013 which proved unsuccessful. I'll make a long story short: Over the past three years, my a-fib became active 24/7. My cardio team at Mayo has worked tirelessly to help me with it. I met with two Electro-Physiologists in Cardiology this February. I spent three days in St. Mary's in Rochester under observation while they prescribed a medication. It worked. I am in normal sinus rhythm. I am not at liberty to tell you the name of the med except to tell you it is expensive and Blue Cross will not pay for it. I'll let your cardio team proceed with the process as it might not be what it indicated for you. All I can say is, I am a happy camper and I can tell the difference. All the best to you.

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@rois4richo, I am curious as to why you are "not at liberty" to state the name of the medication that you are taking for a-fib. You sure have got our attention. As you responded to @yurkosolhan, I believe the medication prescribed is dofetilide (Tikosyn).

@truus1106, you can read more about dofetilide (Tikosyn) on Mayo Clinic's website here: https://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/dofetilide-oral-route/description/drg-20063516

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Colleen – Thanks for the note. I don't feel it appropriate to be giving out a prescription name. This is between the Doctor and the patient. That's just my thought.

Rich

And yes, it is Tikosyn.

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Fred @fey42, please refer back to the recent messages in this discussion, and you'll find that the member who originally avoided sharing the name of the medication explained his reason — and more important, complied twice with requests to identify it, and in fact did so again in the message you replied to just above. Reading email notifications can sometimes lead to loss of context as the discussion flows. If you read from this message onwards, you'll see where the question has been answered https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/is-afib-ever-cured/?pg=2#comment-466312 and since it was, it was worthy of a "like."
Martin Jensen

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A friendly reminder about the Community Guidelines (https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/about-connect/tab/community-guidelines/). Please see in particular guidelines 1 and 2 excerpted here:
1. Be careful about giving out medical advice
– Sharing your own experience is fine, but don't tell other members what they should do.

2. Remain respectful at all times.
– Exercise tolerance and respect toward other participants whose views may differ from your own. Disagreements are fine, but mutual respect is a must.
– Personal attacks against members or health care providers are not acceptable. Such posts will be removed.

Each person uses their own personal criteria when "liking" a post. Sometimes I like a post to signal that I've read it or that I respect someone's opinion even if is not my own.

Mayo Clinic Connect is a place to share experiences and can include diagnosis, treatment, medication, psychosocial issues, caregiving, mental wellbeing and more. Each individual maintains their right to share or withhold information in keeping with their own definition of privacy and anonymity.
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@colleenyoung

A friendly reminder about the Community Guidelines (https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/about-connect/tab/community-guidelines/). Please see in particular guidelines 1 and 2 excerpted here:
1. Be careful about giving out medical advice
– Sharing your own experience is fine, but don't tell other members what they should do.

2. Remain respectful at all times.
– Exercise tolerance and respect toward other participants whose views may differ from your own. Disagreements are fine, but mutual respect is a must.
– Personal attacks against members or health care providers are not acceptable. Such posts will be removed.

Each person uses their own personal criteria when "liking" a post. Sometimes I like a post to signal that I've read it or that I respect someone's opinion even if is not my own.

Mayo Clinic Connect is a place to share experiences and can include diagnosis, treatment, medication, psychosocial issues, caregiving, mental wellbeing and more. Each individual maintains their right to share or withhold information in keeping with their own definition of privacy and anonymity.
– Mayo Clinic Connect: Your Safety and Privacy https://connect.mayoclinic.org/page/about-connect/newsfeed-post/mayo-clinic-connect-your-safety-and-privacy/

If anyone has further questions about the guidelines, actions taken or how the site is governed, please contact me using this form: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/contact-a-community-moderator/

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Thank you, I agree.Margreet

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@elegantgem

Thanks for the info Colleen. It took me awhile to understand what afib is all about. I have been living with it for about 2 years now and don't know what causes it for me. I know at times if I am exercising or walking it can start up but hate to say that is the cause because so many articles tell you to do that to prevent it. I do have hyperthyrodism but it is very mild. I cannot say I know if the afib would have happened anyways or if walking has caused it. That is why I want to learn more. I would take medicine if I knew it would stop it but that doesn't seem to be the case for me. My episodes scare me. I have a heart rate monitor and it goes to 208 and can take 2 hours to get back to normal. I really find it difficult to deal with. Thanks again for the articles to read.

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Hi, I have Afib for last three years. It is well under control with Tikosyn (generic Dofetilede). You can ask your doctor if you can try it. It has to be given in specialized doctor’s supervision. Get admit in hospital and stay three days to take this medicine under doctor’s control. It is a risky medicine but I am okay with it. No harm in getting professional advise.

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