Is Afib ever cured?

Posted by elegantgem @elegantgem, Nov 23, 2020

I know this seems like an unlikely question but I wanted to ask people if you can be diagnosed with Afib and then be told you don't have it anymore? I ask because after a heart ablation I thought my afib was gone but it shows itself back up every month or so. So I was wondering if any treatment causes it to disappear.

A friend of mine had his cured about 20 years or more ago. He had about 3 dozen wires or ? in his heat ablated but his A-Fib returned. A few years later his cardiologist called him to say he could probably get rid of it permanently. He ablated about 20 more wires or ? & his A-Fib was gone for good. I have heard of a new medical device that searches out every wire or ? in your heart & only ablates the faulty one/s. I believe it is called electrophysiology. I suggest you ask your doctor & also ask if he gets paid to prescribe Eliquis or another A-Fib med. Good Luck !

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I’m 80 years old, very high calcium score but no symptoms. Exercise regularly. Was put on Eliquis after episode of atrial fib during gall bladder attack and sepsis. Is it necessary to stay on blood thinners now forever?

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Hi @svend and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I wanted you to be able to connect with people that have similar questions regarding Afib and blood thinners so you will see that I moved your inquiry to an ongoing discussion that includes several other members. I can tell you that people with prolonged episodes of Afib or frequent episodes, have a much higher risk of heart conditions and/or strokes. So if you have had several, your doctor may want to keep you on them to prevent throwing a clot and having a stroke.
How many episodes have you had since your gall bladder attack?

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@amandaburnett

Hi @svend and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I wanted you to be able to connect with people that have similar questions regarding Afib and blood thinners so you will see that I moved your inquiry to an ongoing discussion that includes several other members. I can tell you that people with prolonged episodes of Afib or frequent episodes, have a much higher risk of heart conditions and/or strokes. So if you have had several, your doctor may want to keep you on them to prevent throwing a clot and having a stroke.
How many episodes have you had since your gall bladder attack?

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I had a fib flutter two years ago and no instance of a fib since my gallbladder attack.

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Thanks for considering this. I am concerned about a fall and brain bleed or stomach bleed…..and don’t want to stay on this if not necessary

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@svend

Thanks for considering this. I am concerned about a fall and brain bleed or stomach bleed…..and don’t want to stay on this if not necessary

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Had bouts of afib a few years ago. Put on xarelto. Then had a successful ablation in 2017. Wanted to go off xarelto but cardiologist, wisely, talked me out of it. Family history of afib (mother died of a stroke following cessation of her warfarin for 3 days for minor surgery).
Three years later my afib returned (not unusual), this time continuous. After two unsuccessful cardioversions, having another ablation following second vaccine. Hopeful.
Never miss taking my xarelto. Price of my history and family history.
I think Warfarin has more danger of brain bleeds. And now xarelto has an antidote.
Still, always a decision between you and your cardiologist. Best of luck.

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@svend

I’m 80 years old, very high calcium score but no symptoms. Exercise regularly. Was put on Eliquis after episode of atrial fib during gall bladder attack and sepsis. Is it necessary to stay on blood thinners now forever?

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Hi @svend. Your question is straight-forward and concise. The answer could take pages. One reason for that is that the arrhythmia could be any of dozens of variants of A-fib. You mentioned an "episode;" does that mean you recorded the erratic heart beat rhythm once or more often. Was it discovered on an EKG exam, or did you feel it — once or repetitive, barely felt or rib-rattling? Initiated during sepsis and gall bladder maladies, could the therapy have caused the arrhythmia? I don't ask these questions in order to pry, but to highlight some of the factors you may wish to explore in detail with a cardiologist.

In my case, A-fib was detected only on an EKG; I felt no symptoms and still don't several years later. However, I'm on Coumadin whose active ingredient (Warfarin) has to be monitored regularly with lab tests (unlike Eliquis). Warfarin is vulnerable to Vitamin K, readily available, for example, in dark green vegetables and some meats, so I have to be sure that I maintain a stable intake of those foods — otherwise I could neutralize the Warfarin and develop small blood clots that could interfere with blood supplies to my brain or other important organs. On the other hand, if too much Warfarin accumulates in my blood (mainly because I carelessly avoided Vitamin K foods for a couple of days or more) I could incur a hemorrhagic stroke and a dangerous internal bleed. I had extensive discussions with my medical team about switching from Warfarin to Eliquis and decided to stay with Warfarin. Since my personal situation was somewhat unique, our reasons for staying with Warfarin may not apply to your or other's situation. Let me know of any information about my situation that you think might be helpful in yours. Martin

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Hello! I have had a-fib for at least 10 years off and on. I had an ablation in 2013 which proved unsuccessful. I'll make a long story short: Over the past three years, my a-fib became active 24/7. My cardio team at Mayo has worked tirelessly to help me with it. I met with two Electro-Physiologists in Cardiology this February. I spent three days in St. Mary's in Rochester under observation while they prescribed a medication. It worked. I am in normal sinus rhythm. I am not at liberty to tell you the name of the med except to tell you it is expensive and Blue Cross will not pay for it. I'll let your cardio team proceed with the process as it might not be what it indicated for you. All I can say is, I am a happy camper and I can tell the difference. All the best to you.

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Can you give us more details fey42. Maybe a website or a telephone number. I am on Eliquis and have a pretty good
insurance plan. However, they just increased the price on it and know there will be another increase next year.

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@fey42. @elegantgem.. Is this cash price? I doubt Canada accepts our Medicare insurance. Last year towards the end of the year I was paying $147 for one month's supply. Totally outrageous.

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@rois4richo

Hello! I have had a-fib for at least 10 years off and on. I had an ablation in 2013 which proved unsuccessful. I'll make a long story short: Over the past three years, my a-fib became active 24/7. My cardio team at Mayo has worked tirelessly to help me with it. I met with two Electro-Physiologists in Cardiology this February. I spent three days in St. Mary's in Rochester under observation while they prescribed a medication. It worked. I am in normal sinus rhythm. I am not at liberty to tell you the name of the med except to tell you it is expensive and Blue Cross will not pay for it. I'll let your cardio team proceed with the process as it might not be what it indicated for you. All I can say is, I am a happy camper and I can tell the difference. All the best to you.

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Hi, is it Tycosin? Simple yes or no. Respectfully and thankfully, gws

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@predictable

Hi @svend. Your question is straight-forward and concise. The answer could take pages. One reason for that is that the arrhythmia could be any of dozens of variants of A-fib. You mentioned an "episode;" does that mean you recorded the erratic heart beat rhythm once or more often. Was it discovered on an EKG exam, or did you feel it — once or repetitive, barely felt or rib-rattling? Initiated during sepsis and gall bladder maladies, could the therapy have caused the arrhythmia? I don't ask these questions in order to pry, but to highlight some of the factors you may wish to explore in detail with a cardiologist.

In my case, A-fib was detected only on an EKG; I felt no symptoms and still don't several years later. However, I'm on Coumadin whose active ingredient (Warfarin) has to be monitored regularly with lab tests (unlike Eliquis). Warfarin is vulnerable to Vitamin K, readily available, for example, in dark green vegetables and some meats, so I have to be sure that I maintain a stable intake of those foods — otherwise I could neutralize the Warfarin and develop small blood clots that could interfere with blood supplies to my brain or other important organs. On the other hand, if too much Warfarin accumulates in my blood (mainly because I carelessly avoided Vitamin K foods for a couple of days or more) I could incur a hemorrhagic stroke and a dangerous internal bleed. I had extensive discussions with my medical team about switching from Warfarin to Eliquis and decided to stay with Warfarin. Since my personal situation was somewhat unique, our reasons for staying with Warfarin may not apply to your or other's situation. Let me know of any information about my situation that you think might be helpful in yours. Martin

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Thanks for your helpful reply. The only episode I had was recorded in ekg in er while having gall bladder infection. Cardiologist seems to think, because of my age and history, that it will likely return and therefore better to be on elelequis. Would rather not take it long term, but certainly don’t want to risk a stroke…..no easy answer.

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