Hip replacement: What are the symptoms of failure?

Posted by mnpat @mnpat, Nov 15, 2019

Hello, I had my left hip replaced in 2003 at the age of 60. Great results! However, I am wondering what the symptoms of failure might be? I have a lot of arthritis and had my left knee replaced in 2017 and am planning to schedule the right one after Christmas. Meantime I am walking with a bit of a limp. Sometimes I have pain in the area above the top of the femur (that sort of indentation before the buttocks connect. No groin pain. Hip surgeon told me he didn't know how long the hip would last…..probably more than 15 years…..I am now at 16 yrs. Also some nights I have trouble sleeping on the left side. Comments? Thanks! Pat

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Hi, @mnpat – it makes sense if your surgeon told you your hip would probably last more than 15 years and you are now at 16 that you might wonder what it would be like – what you might experience – if the hip started to fail. I would wonder about that, as well.

I'd like to see if @gerhard9321 @contentandwell @geek_girl @moemoe @nancyaucoin may have some information on what the signs of failure might look like from their personal experiences, those of a friend or family member who has had hip replacement, or their personal research.

@mnpat – have you gotten to ask your primary care doctor about the pain in the area above the top of the femur or the trouble sleeping on the left side? If so, what did he or she say about it?

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@lisalucier

Hi, @mnpat – it makes sense if your surgeon told you your hip would probably last more than 15 years and you are now at 16 that you might wonder what it would be like – what you might experience – if the hip started to fail. I would wonder about that, as well.

I'd like to see if @gerhard9321 @contentandwell @geek_girl @moemoe @nancyaucoin may have some information on what the signs of failure might look like from their personal experiences, those of a friend or family member who has had hip replacement, or their personal research.

@mnpat – have you gotten to ask your primary care doctor about the pain in the area above the top of the femur or the trouble sleeping on the left side? If so, what did he or she say about it?

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@lisalucier @mnpat sorry, but I have never had a hip replacement and everyone I know who has is very happy with them and have not had any problems.
I have had two TKRs but they have both done very well, no complaints.
JK

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@lisalucier

Hi, @mnpat – it makes sense if your surgeon told you your hip would probably last more than 15 years and you are now at 16 that you might wonder what it would be like – what you might experience – if the hip started to fail. I would wonder about that, as well.

I'd like to see if @gerhard9321 @contentandwell @geek_girl @moemoe @nancyaucoin may have some information on what the signs of failure might look like from their personal experiences, those of a friend or family member who has had hip replacement, or their personal research.

@mnpat – have you gotten to ask your primary care doctor about the pain in the area above the top of the femur or the trouble sleeping on the left side? If so, what did he or she say about it?

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I have not discussed it with my primary care doctor. It is not constant…..one of those irritating irregular things.

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Has anyone heard of revision surgery within one year, I was 69 years old in good shape not over weight and not on any meds, but had a lot of pain walking and doing normal actives around the house for a year about before seeing my orthoptic surgeon.
To the point:
I had total hip replacement one year ago and found out that the pain I have been complaining about in my thigh has been a loose stem!
Now the doctor is telling me I need revision surgery to remove old stem and replace, is this normal? I have read about this type of surgery being done after 8-10 years but have not read anything about one year or less?

SteveD

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@stevcin

Has anyone heard of revision surgery within one year, I was 69 years old in good shape not over weight and not on any meds, but had a lot of pain walking and doing normal actives around the house for a year about before seeing my orthoptic surgeon.
To the point:
I had total hip replacement one year ago and found out that the pain I have been complaining about in my thigh has been a loose stem!
Now the doctor is telling me I need revision surgery to remove old stem and replace, is this normal? I have read about this type of surgery being done after 8-10 years but have not read anything about one year or less?

SteveD

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Google it. I think I read on a facebook group that sometimes this happens. But they do more than remove and replace the stem. they do some wiring of some sort. I'd research it well, then go for a second opinion. I wouldn't put weight on it til I found out exactly if this doctor is planning to do the right thing. Second opinions are priceless. So is research. My best to you.

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@stevcin

Has anyone heard of revision surgery within one year, I was 69 years old in good shape not over weight and not on any meds, but had a lot of pain walking and doing normal actives around the house for a year about before seeing my orthoptic surgeon.
To the point:
I had total hip replacement one year ago and found out that the pain I have been complaining about in my thigh has been a loose stem!
Now the doctor is telling me I need revision surgery to remove old stem and replace, is this normal? I have read about this type of surgery being done after 8-10 years but have not read anything about one year or less?

SteveD

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I think it's very unusual but not unheard of. There are some possible causes – failure of the bone to grow around the implant, microfractures of the femur, and maybe necrosis – loss of bone.

I had hip revision surgeries after 4-5 years due to recalled implants, so am familiar with early revision. I too had always complained about the hip not being "right".

Here are a few things I wish I had known to ask the surgeon:
Exactly which implant do I have – manufacturer, type, model, etc?
What is the failure history of this device?
Are there any recalls on this device? (If there is get a copy of the notice to see what relief the manufacturer is offering.)
What is the exact diagnosis shown by the imaging – fractures, necrosis or ??
Does the surgeon have a lot of experience doing revisions? If not, find one who does.

I think that about covers it. Have you asked any of these questions?
Sue

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I did google but could not find any cases or blogs that discuss hip replacement within one year? I as so disappointed that I need revision surgery just want to understand why?

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Thanks all after googling and Asking on this blog i guess a hip replacement In less than a year is just that unusual, thanks. I will keep looking and asking!

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@stevcin

Thanks all after googling and Asking on this blog i guess a hip replacement In less than a year is just that unusual, thanks. I will keep looking and asking!

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But my question is still whether the doctor has explained what happened? I wish I had known one & two years out from my initial replacement to keep pressing for answers. Instead, I didn't get help until I was very ill.
Seriously, get the implant info and research for failures for that brand and model. Even ask the manufacturer for their statistics. Without specific details, it is really harder to get good answers. There are dozens, if not hundreds of stems, balls, cups and liners on the market – finding out which you have you make learning about your issues much easier. (It might even be in your detailed post-surgical reports, if you still have them.)
Sue

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@sueinmn

But my question is still whether the doctor has explained what happened? I wish I had known one & two years out from my initial replacement to keep pressing for answers. Instead, I didn't get help until I was very ill.
Seriously, get the implant info and research for failures for that brand and model. Even ask the manufacturer for their statistics. Without specific details, it is really harder to get good answers. There are dozens, if not hundreds of stems, balls, cups and liners on the market – finding out which you have you make learning about your issues much easier. (It might even be in your detailed post-surgical reports, if you still have them.)
Sue

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Thanks Sue I have called the doctor's office, waiting on a return call!

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I thought groin pain meant hip joint issue.

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