Treating Osteoporosis

Posted by heritage1955 @heritage1955, Apr 1, 2016

Hi. I’m new to the site and am interested in treating osteoperosis. I’m 39 yo and recently had a bone density that showed I’m at -2.4. So, going through the intial “I can’t believe it” stuff. 🙂

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Bones, Joints & Muscles group.

@irishk

Mohavegal,

Did the Dr. tell you to take so much Vit D ? My Endo said no one should ever take more then 1 or 2000 without a Dr’s suggestion. I have never heard any Dr. say Vit D should be 70 and I have asked many Endo’s and Internists. They all say it needs to be over 30. I just asked a University Geriatrician who works in Endo/Osteoporosis clinic and she said Vit D should not be over 50, they just do not know enough yet if it is safe when higher then 50. I would have to go back and check Dr Ott’s website but I think that she recommends a Vit D level between 40 and 50. I read an article in Nutrition Action many years ago on a suspected connection between high Vit D and pancreatic cancer.

k

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Just had a conversation with my primary care physician yesterday and he said keep it where its at.  Perfect. Was checking my last cbc report which was done 4 weeks ago. For osteoporosis that’s very important.

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@jmbjar

Blood tests should l be done to check for increased levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium, and alkaline phosphatase, and lower levels of phosphorous. A 24-hour urine collection test can help determine how much calcium is being removed from the body

The parathyroid glands are located in the neck, near or attached to the back side of the thyroid gland. They produce parathyroid hormone. This hormone controls calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D levels in the blood and bone.

When calcium levels are too low, the body responds by making more parathyroid hormone. This hormone causes calcium levels in the blood to rise, as more calcium is taken from the bone and reabsorbed by the intestines and kidney.

One or more of the parathyroid glands may grow larger. This leads to too much parathyroid hormone (a condition called primary hyperparathyroidism). Most often, the cause is not known. When a parathyroid gland is diseased, it causes calcium to be leached from the bones

The disease is most common in people over age 60, but it does also occur in younger adults. .
Women are more likely to be affected than men.
Radiation to the head and neck increases the risk.

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Just went on a thyroid medication. Maybe that was partially my bone problems.

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@angelas

I, too, am interested in treatments for osteoporosis at a younger (50) age; however, postmenopausal. I found Dr. Lani’s Bone Health Guide book helpful. I’m wary of beginning medical treatments (Forteo for 18-24 months and then a bisphosphonate for 5-7 years) based on one BMD scan.

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I was on the depo shot which ceased menstruations. Hence the lack of estrogen to prevent the on set :/ but I do think it’s odd that they haven’t pulled labs. Ordered CA+d without having a baseline. Hmmmm.

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Mohavegal, good your Dr. says OK. I know the lab range says up to 100. Is your primary care Dr. in an Integrative Care Practice or a Functional Mediciine Dr ? They usually want Vits in a much higher range then conventional Dr’s.

K

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@irishk

Mohavegal, good your Dr. says OK. I know the lab range says up to 100. Is your primary care Dr. in an Integrative Care Practice or a Functional Mediciine Dr ? They usually want Vits in a much higher range then conventional Dr’s.

K

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Actually he’s a.little of both.  I have a Humana plan. He is a young doctor & has.a broader education on some of the alternative options.

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I just joined Mayo Clinic Connect today and am glad to find you! My dexa test indicates I have progressed to Osteoporosis and because I’m not good at swallowing meds, I’m interested in the injection method. Wondering if others have used Prolia which involves just two shots a year.

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@nancyevn

I just joined Mayo Clinic Connect today and am glad to find you! My dexa test indicates I have progressed to Osteoporosis and because I’m not good at swallowing meds, I’m interested in the injection method. Wondering if others have used Prolia which involves just two shots a year.

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Welcome @nancyevn. Glad to have you join us on Connect.
I moved your message to this existing thread where you’ll meet @mohavegal @heritage1955 @jmbjar @angelas and others. Several have taken Prolia. I’m also tagging @arthritichands @spiritbird2 @allegro to join in the discussion here.

My mom takes Prolia. She luckily has not experienced any of the possible side effects. Nancy, do you have any concerns about Prolia?

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@nancyevn

I just joined Mayo Clinic Connect today and am glad to find you! My dexa test indicates I have progressed to Osteoporosis and because I’m not good at swallowing meds, I’m interested in the injection method. Wondering if others have used Prolia which involves just two shots a year.

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Hello. I just took my first injection of Prolia this Monday. I haven’t had any side effect yet. I haven’t had any previous meds for my Osteoporosis either. My Doctor wanted to start me out with Prolia.
I had a full blood panel done before I had the injection making sure my blood calcium levels were good and I was not anemic as I am prone to that. I also got all my dental work done before the injection also.
Wish you luck in our decision.

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I just heard of Prolia a couple days ago when I talked to the doctor. I’ve been taking (chewable) Calcium & Vit. D. I have no concerns about Prolia so far but have yet to read all the materials he gave me. Dental work first is a new thought. The side effects are always scary. Injections twice a year appeals to me over oral meds.

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I had my first injection about 4 weeks ago. Was scared to death, especially after reading only a small portion of the material that came with the injection. So far I haven’t experienced any side effects. Doubt that you are getting enough mg’s of calcium from a chewable. I had to greatly increase my intake because I began to experience some pain. Am now taking 2300 mg’s daily.
Good luck

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@angelas

Has anyone received their 1st BMD scan with a low t-score, like -3.1 in the spine, and been prescribed Forteo? I’m 50 and a little freaked out as I thought I doing a baseline BMD scan. I have no underlying conditions that can explain the extremely low score. Family history of estrogen-receptive cancer puts HRT out of the question. I would like to wait a year, increase calcium/vit D/exercise, and get another scan. Thoughts?

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I am new to this group and also was diagnosed with osteoporosis (-3.7 spine) recently at 52. My doctor said that I need to go on medication right away- and that lifestyle changes (diet/exercise) will not be enough. However, after reading about the various medications, I am hesitant to take them and am also thinking of waiting a year, improving my diet and exercising to see if this helps. I also have an appointment Friday with an endocrinologist to see what he recommends. My vitamin D level was low (23) so I was prescribed a high dosage for three months. My calcium was 9.7 MG/DL. I am still researching the meds but the more I read the scarier it gets!

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@angelas

Has anyone received their 1st BMD scan with a low t-score, like -3.1 in the spine, and been prescribed Forteo? I’m 50 and a little freaked out as I thought I doing a baseline BMD scan. I have no underlying conditions that can explain the extremely low score. Family history of estrogen-receptive cancer puts HRT out of the question. I would like to wait a year, increase calcium/vit D/exercise, and get another scan. Thoughts?

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I can understand everyone’s fear of the side effects, but the very likely side effect of not getting treated quickly is a permanent wheelchair. I am not kidding here! I am 50, had two breaks before I got my bones tested. I have a 2.5 ish score on 2/3 of my bones. Please believe me that getting into this breaking cycle is VERY hard to get out of. I cracked a rib and was immobilized for 8 weeks. I was in good health to begin with but not a common exerciser. I lost so much in balance and strength that another fall was ineviatable. Broke my elbow, now my ankle. Been unable to walk for 8 weeks and counting because my bad bones broke soooooooooooooo much worse than they would have if they are healthy. Even with medication osteoporosis takes 2 – 3 years to fix. Anyone care to guess how many times more over the next few years I am going to fall and break somethIng during that time? What if it’s my hip? Sincerely I beg you to consider getting treated as soon as you can!

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