Heart Rhythm Conditions – Welcome to the group

Welcome to the Heart Rhythm Conditions group on Mayo Clinic Connect.
Did you know that the average heart beats 100,000 times a day? Millions of people live with heart rhythm problems (heart arrhythmias) which occur when the electrical impulses that coordinate heartbeats don’t work properly. Let’s connect with each other; we can share stories and learn about coping with the challenges, and living well with abnormal heart rhythms. I invite you to follow the group. Simply click the +FOLLOW icon on the group landing page.

I’m Kanaaz (@kanaazpereira), and I’m the moderator of this group. When you post to this group, chances are you’ll also be greeted by volunteer patient Mentors and fellow members. Learn more about Moderators and Mentors on Connect.

Let’s chat. Why not start by introducing yourself?

Hi @kates1221. Glad to see you again on Mayo Connect. You and I share the problems of A-fib and high blood pressure. I have several years "enjoying" the challenges involved and dealing with them with the help of a very capable medical team — Internist, Nephrologist, Cardiologist, and Anticoagulation Specialist. None of them has told me "there is no cure" for A-fib OR hypertension, but they have said I should expect to be on medication, at least, until we find a therapy to stabilize my symptoms and carry on my life. I have three medications for hypertension (Carvedilol, Lisinopril, and Amiloride diuretic). I also take Coumadin, a "blood thinner" (or more properly an anticoagulant drug) to prevent formation of blood clots within my heart when its rhythm is disturbed and fails to move blood through promptly. My arrhythmic medication to modulate my heart rate is Carvedilol, a beta blocker. In my case, my medical team and I have asked each other about cardioversion and ablation and have decided each time that my symptoms and the risks don't make either treatment necessary right now. Send along any questions that occur to you and might prompt me for more information of use to you.

Finally, though, this one recommendation: Get a second opinion from a well-known, recognized authority on arrhythmia and how to treat it — your state university medical clinic is one possibility. Have you discussed with your heart doctor the possibility of referral for a second opinion? Martin

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@kates1221

I was diagnosed with afib and high blood pressure. I was put on a blood thinner, medicine to keep my heart from racing and two blood pressure medicines. I was told that my afib is permanent and has no cure. Has anyone been told this and should I get a second opinion on whether or not an ablation will help me? I am a former dancer and life long exerciser. I also had surgery to repair a hole in my heart at age six. I am 66 years old and this is the first time I've had trouble with my heart. I was also told that years of physical exercise and prior heart surgery probably predisposed me to the problems with my heart. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

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Years of physical exercise predisposed you to heart problems??? Wow! I'm not a doctor and I don't even play one on TV, but I find that incomprehensible. Exercise IMHO probably predisposed you to living well until age 66 and even beyond. Who knows why these heart problems occur? My doctor has never told me why. I don't expect him to know why. Maybe it's genetic. Maybe it's not. It doesn't sound good to me to blame your dancing and exercise for this problem. I had a heart attack a year and a half ago and my doctor wanted me in a cardiac exercise program as soon as I was able, which was only a few weeks. I have A-fib. Have had it for years. I think the reason I'm in good shape now is because I exercise regularly at a gym. Yes, do get a second opinion.

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@shortshot80

Hi, my book started out to be a book on a "Woman doing commercial fishing with my husband. My husband died May 4, 1918 after 57 years of marriage. A friend told me I needed closer in the book for Bob. Well if I have to a ending for him, better have a beginning. So I started when I was a little girl. I starter with the year I was born. Then everything else started with the year anything happened… Brother was born 1934….1942 another brother…1944 anothre brother and so on till I arrived at 2019. Each year started with the year: then the information and so on. I ended the book in 2019. It is being proof reading by my daughter and she will get it printed in the next month. Nancy (shodrtshhot).

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^Thank you for the synopsis.Daughters are great. I have four. Who is publisimg your book?

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@eileena

I really like the format you used in your book. I'd call it a Lifeboat like they are now doing for foster kids to help them attempt to be normal and learn about their own history.

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At 90 yrs. old, I have a good grasp on who I am. I just need to get off my butt and do it.

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@dyannne

Years of physical exercise predisposed you to heart problems??? Wow! I'm not a doctor and I don't even play one on TV, but I find that incomprehensible. Exercise IMHO probably predisposed you to living well until age 66 and even beyond. Who knows why these heart problems occur? My doctor has never told me why. I don't expect him to know why. Maybe it's genetic. Maybe it's not. It doesn't sound good to me to blame your dancing and exercise for this problem. I had a heart attack a year and a half ago and my doctor wanted me in a cardiac exercise program as soon as I was able, which was only a few weeks. I have A-fib. Have had it for years. I think the reason I'm in good shape now is because I exercise regularly at a gym. Yes, do get a second opinion.

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I'm with you. That is a ridiculous response
I have always been very active, fit never sick a day in my life, scheduled a spine I ejection for my sciatica, got really nervous and went into afib!!! I have had afib since then on and off.dont take any drugs for it
Second opinion is a great idea

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@kates1221

I was diagnosed with afib and high blood pressure. I was put on a blood thinner, medicine to keep my heart from racing and two blood pressure medicines. I was told that my afib is permanent and has no cure. Has anyone been told this and should I get a second opinion on whether or not an ablation will help me? I am a former dancer and life long exerciser. I also had surgery to repair a hole in my heart at age six. I am 66 years old and this is the first time I've had trouble with my heart. I was also told that years of physical exercise and prior heart surgery probably predisposed me to the problems with my heart. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

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Kates.Sorry to hear of you recent heart problems.I do not have the extensive problem you have. I have a life time A-iFb and did not think much of it. My family physician suggest a blood thinner. I got warferin and was tested for levels on a periodic basis. But as I aged, now 90 years old, the use of a pace maker was suggested, My energy really increased after 60 demand St. Jude implant. It was simple and I don,t know it is there. This was done as a preventative of throwing a clot for a stroke. I had to switch to Eliquist blood thinner when warferin did not keep me in the groove. It works well for me two times a day. My reason to encourage is in exercise. I am a retired Physical Therapist. I have lots of spinal problems and need a walker. But,the story is, do not blame any heart problem on exercise. I exercise daily, take my walker to the mall to walk in the winter and am now finishing the first of the year physical Therapy referral. I hang inverted 2 times a week at 45 degrees. I will continue at $35. a month at a new spa. In addition, part of the treatment is seeing other people and chatting.My daughter graduated from Akron U. with a BA in Choreography. I know how much control and grace you struggled for as a Dancer. Your heart is stronger with your problem now then if you had not laid the background to live longer. I am a health nut. Google berries, nuts, honey with garlic, Himalayan pink salt satuation for hydrartion, apple cider vineager in organs and and intestinal tract, flaxseed oil and cottge cheese, steaming normal food and vegetables,. etc. & family me,bers died of cancer. Make a decision that now is the time to lower your blood pressure with good eating habits,( not diets), exercise, social contact the freedom from stressors. Stressors can be bad food, bad people, bad thoughts. Job, Solomon lived to be 140.yrs old Why can't I? Why am I not dead like the rest of my family? Execising, old style eating habit, not smoking, minimal alcohol, getting away by your self and being positive are part of the answer. I am sure other good people will come forward with excellent advice. Now is the time to listen to them. Good Luck! bill54321

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@bill54321

Kates.Sorry to hear of you recent heart problems.I do not have the extensive problem you have. I have a life time A-iFb and did not think much of it. My family physician suggest a blood thinner. I got warferin and was tested for levels on a periodic basis. But as I aged, now 90 years old, the use of a pace maker was suggested, My energy really increased after 60 demand St. Jude implant. It was simple and I don,t know it is there. This was done as a preventative of throwing a clot for a stroke. I had to switch to Eliquist blood thinner when warferin did not keep me in the groove. It works well for me two times a day. My reason to encourage is in exercise. I am a retired Physical Therapist. I have lots of spinal problems and need a walker. But,the story is, do not blame any heart problem on exercise. I exercise daily, take my walker to the mall to walk in the winter and am now finishing the first of the year physical Therapy referral. I hang inverted 2 times a week at 45 degrees. I will continue at $35. a month at a new spa. In addition, part of the treatment is seeing other people and chatting.My daughter graduated from Akron U. with a BA in Choreography. I know how much control and grace you struggled for as a Dancer. Your heart is stronger with your problem now then if you had not laid the background to live longer. I am a health nut. Google berries, nuts, honey with garlic, Himalayan pink salt satuation for hydrartion, apple cider vineager in organs and and intestinal tract, flaxseed oil and cottge cheese, steaming normal food and vegetables,. etc. & family me,bers died of cancer. Make a decision that now is the time to lower your blood pressure with good eating habits,( not diets), exercise, social contact the freedom from stressors. Stressors can be bad food, bad people, bad thoughts. Job, Solomon lived to be 140.yrs old Why can't I? Why am I not dead like the rest of my family? Execising, old style eating habit, not smoking, minimal alcohol, getting away by your self and being positive are part of the answer. I am sure other good people will come forward with excellent advice. Now is the time to listen to them. Good Luck! bill54321

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bill54321 thank you so much for taking to time to reach out to me. I eat clean and try to consume foods that are good for blood pressure. For instance, I really believe in garlic and apple cider vinegar, but I'm afraid of certain foods that are said to thin the blood. If I could impose on you one more time, may I ask what you think about eating foods that are natural blood thinners while taking a blood thinning medicine.
Thank you so much

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@suzanne2019

I'm with you. That is a ridiculous response
I have always been very active, fit never sick a day in my life, scheduled a spine I ejection for my sciatica, got really nervous and went into afib!!! I have had afib since then on and off.dont take any drugs for it
Second opinion is a great idea

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suzanne2019 I was floored when he told me that a good many of his patients with afib are long distance runners, marathoners, bodybuilders and athletes. I'm definitely going to seek a second opinion. Right now I feel bewildered, lost and can't seem to stop crying. I've gone from exercising 5 times a week, including weight lifting to being told not to do anything more strenuous than moderate walking. I've never in my life needed any type of medication. Now I take four. I'm so grateful to have found this site. Thank you so much for reaching out to me. Please stay in touch. It really does help to talk to others who understand.

Liked by healthytoday

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@dyannne

Years of physical exercise predisposed you to heart problems??? Wow! I'm not a doctor and I don't even play one on TV, but I find that incomprehensible. Exercise IMHO probably predisposed you to living well until age 66 and even beyond. Who knows why these heart problems occur? My doctor has never told me why. I don't expect him to know why. Maybe it's genetic. Maybe it's not. It doesn't sound good to me to blame your dancing and exercise for this problem. I had a heart attack a year and a half ago and my doctor wanted me in a cardiac exercise program as soon as I was able, which was only a few weeks. I have A-fib. Have had it for years. I think the reason I'm in good shape now is because I exercise regularly at a gym. Yes, do get a second opinion.

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You having had afib for years can hopefully tell me how to get over the feeling of panic and fear. My doctor told me that having afib is common and not in itself lethal. Perhaps you can give me some insight on how to go about my life without the feeling of depression, fear and anger. I still exercise, and do things that I enjoy doing, but I just can't seem to feel happy anymore. Any advice? Please.

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@dyannne

Years of physical exercise predisposed you to heart problems??? Wow! I'm not a doctor and I don't even play one on TV, but I find that incomprehensible. Exercise IMHO probably predisposed you to living well until age 66 and even beyond. Who knows why these heart problems occur? My doctor has never told me why. I don't expect him to know why. Maybe it's genetic. Maybe it's not. It doesn't sound good to me to blame your dancing and exercise for this problem. I had a heart attack a year and a half ago and my doctor wanted me in a cardiac exercise program as soon as I was able, which was only a few weeks. I have A-fib. Have had it for years. I think the reason I'm in good shape now is because I exercise regularly at a gym. Yes, do get a second opinion.

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extreme exercise can definitely cause afib, speaking from my own experience and doing research on this topic.

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@lalton

extreme exercise can definitely cause afib, speaking from my own experience and doing research on this topic.

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Can I impose on you to tell me about your experience and research? I'd really appreciate it.

Liked by dyannne

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@kates1221

suzanne2019 I was floored when he told me that a good many of his patients with afib are long distance runners, marathoners, bodybuilders and athletes. I'm definitely going to seek a second opinion. Right now I feel bewildered, lost and can't seem to stop crying. I've gone from exercising 5 times a week, including weight lifting to being told not to do anything more strenuous than moderate walking. I've never in my life needed any type of medication. Now I take four. I'm so grateful to have found this site. Thank you so much for reaching out to me. Please stay in touch. It really does help to talk to others who understand.

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Don't be discouraged. My son-in-law takes exercises very seriously.. he rows and uses the Pelaton. He had afib for years and had a couple of ablations. Finally, he found a cardiologist in Texas who found that there was a genetic issue that other cardiologists in CA (where we live) did not see. He had an operation and he does not have afib anymore. Actually this Texas cardiologist told him he can go back to his exercise routine the week after the operation. He is no longer on any meds. I had a TSI and now my cardiologist is testing me for afib. I had a loop implant. I'm glad I found this forum. My daughter knows alot about afib because of her husband's experience and she's a comfort. I'm blessed. I have a family history of strokes so I eat very clean, do not smoke or drink and I am not overweight. I can only walk everyday because of my back problems resulting from a horrific car accident when a car ran a light and hit my car. I hope you can be positive and know that you will get better! A second opinion is a good thing.

Liked by dyannne

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@kates1221

suzanne2019 I was floored when he told me that a good many of his patients with afib are long distance runners, marathoners, bodybuilders and athletes. I'm definitely going to seek a second opinion. Right now I feel bewildered, lost and can't seem to stop crying. I've gone from exercising 5 times a week, including weight lifting to being told not to do anything more strenuous than moderate walking. I've never in my life needed any type of medication. Now I take four. I'm so grateful to have found this site. Thank you so much for reaching out to me. Please stay in touch. It really does help to talk to others who understand.

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Anytime you can reach out. I take a long walk every day and am going to start going g back to the gym next week. Going to a new doctor tomorrow who is also holistic so am hoping she gets me. I won't take any drugs so taking Hawthorne berry everyday 500mg probiotic 1000cfu in the morning and drink a cup of Hibiscus(organic dried flowers).every afternoon
Which keeps my BP in check
.make some fresh juice with raw beets,.organic carrits.and a few radishes every couple days. Yoga and meditation. A lot more work then taking a pill but worth it!!!

REPLY
@kates1221

I was diagnosed with afib and high blood pressure. I was put on a blood thinner, medicine to keep my heart from racing and two blood pressure medicines. I was told that my afib is permanent and has no cure. Has anyone been told this and should I get a second opinion on whether or not an ablation will help me? I am a former dancer and life long exerciser. I also had surgery to repair a hole in my heart at age six. I am 66 years old and this is the first time I've had trouble with my heart. I was also told that years of physical exercise and prior heart surgery probably predisposed me to the problems with my heart. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Jump to this post

Hello. I've had problems with PVC's and SVT's for about 45 years. Basically started when I came back from Vietnam. Anyway, PVC's are skipping and fluttering, etc. in the lower chambers of the heart, and SVT's are the irregular heartbeats in the upper chambers of the heart. I got used to experiencing both over the years even though they could get pretty bothersome at times. I worked with them, and played with them. My problem is that I felt every one of them and still do. They can be very alarming at times. Anyway, on occasion during this period I would experience a sudden burst of racing which would last 8-10 seconds or so and then stop. About 8 years ago when I was work sitting at my desk I experienced this sudden onset of speed with my heart but this time it didn't go away. It lasted for 14 hours at approximately 180-200 BPM. It ran its course I guess and when I woke up I was back to a normal heartbeat rate, with the exception of my normal palpitations of course. Well, as time went on the intervals between episodes became shorter and shorter. I did get a cardiologist and tried to manage it when the episodes occurred, but medication never seemed to slow it down. Went to ER with the episodes only three or four times over the 8 years because I just wanted to tough it out. It's called Paroxysmal AFIB which means it's not persistent or permanent like you have at this time. In talking to my cardiologists an ablation was mentioned from time to time. I was really scared about it. But in April of 2019 I decided to go through with it since I never knew when an episode was going to hit. They scheduled it for June of 2019 and about two weeks prior the episodes were getting pretty bad. Luckily I made it to the day of ablation and at that point I told my Dr. just do what you gotta do. Took about four hours. I spent the night and went home the next day. A little scared because my heart still felt a little weird. I've been AFIB free for 8 months with the exception of a few minor episodes lasting 10-15 seconds but that's it. Still have my normal skipping and jumping but the AFIB was actually the biggest concern. They say that sometimes you need another one or at least some touch up if it comes back. I would most certainly do it again if need be. The success rate is pretty high with the type of AFIB I had, but permanent AFIB like you have can be taken care of as well with an ablation. Success rate is a little lower but the key is that there is success. I've always taken as few medications as possible over the years, and still don't take much other than a blood thinner (Eliquis) and metoprolol. At 70, I still smoke and drink beer on occasion. I guess I would be considered a renegade but I live my life the way I want to. Feel free to ask me any questions. This is a pretty lengthy response to you, but there are many things I could probably fill in for you.
Larry Hall.

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@suzanne2019

Anytime you can reach out. I take a long walk every day and am going to start going g back to the gym next week. Going to a new doctor tomorrow who is also holistic so am hoping she gets me. I won't take any drugs so taking Hawthorne berry everyday 500mg probiotic 1000cfu in the morning and drink a cup of Hibiscus(organic dried flowers).every afternoon
Which keeps my BP in check
.make some fresh juice with raw beets,.organic carrits.and a few radishes every couple days. Yoga and meditation. A lot more work then taking a pill but worth it!!!

Jump to this post

We are juicing every three days with garlic, ginger, carrots, apple, lemon, and brussel sprouts. It's very good and increases my energy.

Liked by dyannne

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