Gifts for Caregivers

Posted by Becky, Volunteer Mentor @becsbuddy, Nov 19, 2019

I found this great list in Spry Living magazine which came in my newspaper. Some great suggestions!
1. Time Off. Give someone a day off or a weekend off.
2. Monetary Support: “ a friend gave us a monthly parking pass at the hospital. It made things so much easier”
3. Quality Time: Take a treat and just sit and visit
4. Meals: “when my daughter was struggling with cancer, her friends took turns bringing us prepared dishes, and it was a godsend.”
5. Child or pet care: Add your friend’s dog to your daily walk schedule! They are often forgotten
I recently read where one lady made a quilt from her friend’s daughter’s clothes. It made a great, warm, comfort quilt for her friend! Now, we can’t all make quilts, that’s for sure! What ideas do you have? Something you’ve done or has been done for you?

Thank you for the kind words for caregivers. My husband is disabled and can't work but he doesn't need my physical support, although he needs heaps of emotional support. My problem is that as a caregiver, my clients usually have mental issues along with physical. So when I come home I have very little left to provide emotional support at the end of the day. I just told my husband the truth, what I just said. He now sees a counselor to help him help himself emotionally. Sigh…

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@georgette12

Thank you for the kind words for caregivers. My husband is disabled and can't work but he doesn't need my physical support, although he needs heaps of emotional support. My problem is that as a caregiver, my clients usually have mental issues along with physical. So when I come home I have very little left to provide emotional support at the end of the day. I just told my husband the truth, what I just said. He now sees a counselor to help him help himself emotionally. Sigh…

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@georgette12 you must be mentally and emotionally exhausted by the end of your day. I’m sure it is difficult for you to not be able to provide the emotional support your husband needs. That’s great that he is seeing a counselor, I hope that will give him the help he needs. It sounds as if he understands your position, and I suspect that on weekends you are able to support him more than you can during your work week. You can only do so much, and you have to take care of yourself too. If you don’t you can’t help anyone.
JK

REPLY
@georgette12

Thank you for the kind words for caregivers. My husband is disabled and can't work but he doesn't need my physical support, although he needs heaps of emotional support. My problem is that as a caregiver, my clients usually have mental issues along with physical. So when I come home I have very little left to provide emotional support at the end of the day. I just told my husband the truth, what I just said. He now sees a counselor to help him help himself emotionally. Sigh…

Jump to this post

I’m glad you told your husband the truth @georgette12 . He may have known, deep down, that he was adding to your burden. Have you thought about going to the counselor together? Just sometimes. When I first got sick, my husband would occasionally go with me, partly to support me and to reinforce what the counselor said, but also to learn what he could do to help. Does this sound like something you might do?

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Thank you for the input on maybe seeing a counselor with my husband re caregiving and emotional support. He saw his own counselor today who encouraged him to invite me to a session if I'd like to go. I said I'd go anytime.

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