Wondering if anyone has had an FOV, Floaters Only Vitrectomy

Posted by susan2018 @susan2018, Mar 6, 2019

I am wondering if anyone has had an FOV, Floaters Only Vitrectomy, and would be willing to share their experiences. For at least two years I was plagued with the constant irritating presence of gauzy, wispy, moving clumps that would obscure my vision and make reading and driving a tiring challenge. Prior to this I had had cataract surgery and a lens exchange surgery. Many, many follow up appointments and a second opinion did not pinpoint a reason for my continuing complaints. Although I did not complain of dry eyes, I was led to believe that was my issue and was treated with Xiidra and then Restasis and then even both at the same time, with no improvement in my symptoms. Finally a follow up appointment with a new ophthalmologist in the practice and my description of what I was seeing led to a diagnosis of a degenerating vitreous and a referral to a vitreal surgeon. Last week I had a vitrectomy to remove the vitreous. Despite the after effects of the surgery, the next day when the eye patch and bandages came off, I could immediately tell that my vision in that eye had cleared. It has been such a relief! I am hoping my recovery is uneventful and am now anticipating following up with the surgeon to schedule the procedure on my other eye. Has anyone experienced a situation similar to mine? Why would my problem not be recognized and diagnosed sooner? I have wondered if I simply was not able to describe my symptoms well enough or if ophthalmologists tend not to recognize or acknowledge how debilitating the condition can be. I understand that over time and with age the vitreous does degenerate for all people. Do only a few people experience what I did during that process or are there many people experiencing it’s deleterious effects on their vision and are just living with it, or as in my case, are not able to get a diagnosis from their eye care providers? I should add that I am in my early 70s and was extremely nearsighted my entire life. Anyone out there experience what I did?

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@lacy2

susan…. I do not say this lightly but it is something that has crossed my mind if I have to make a decision in the future: I am 77. …years ago when, for instances, cataract surgery was performed, they did one eye at a time… I do not know why but I wonder if it was not only so the person could "see" with one eye while other healed or ? Would it make sense to perhaps not have surgery or treatment for both eyes at same time, but to have any procedure done to one eye and waiting to find out how the eye heals etc. ? I am so anxious I have even done this with eye drops as have so many reactions…isnt it horrible to not only live with illness and disease but also with the fear of the unknown and decision-making?

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@lacy2 One eye at a time…..protects the other eye from something going wrong—infection, unanticipated reaction to surgery or medical error.

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@markymark215

Thank you all for the replies…

I booked a second opinion with a retina specialist in Chicago for the end of this month.

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@markymark215 A couple of things that happened in my case that I need to keep track of like diabetes (not yet but runs in my family), eye pressure (high blood pressure), dry eyes. Sometimes I also get a thicker film along with floaters which makes it more difficult to see. Seeing retina specialist regularly. Good luck.

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@markymark215

I am currently 29 years old.

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@markymark215 I don’t have any experience with these problems at an early age. As I mentioned I was already 70 when this really hit. Are you by any chance very near sighted? I understand that can exacerbate this condition. A wait and see approach certainly can’t hurt… I think if you had a surgeon who told you that when you and s/he decide the time is right you can have surgery, you would feel a lot better about the situation and would be more comfortable giving yourself time to see if there is any improvement in the meantime.

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@lacy2

…after right eye "lasered" (local miserable hateful ophthalmologist .. truly) you could not ask him anything and he hardly spoke or told you what he was doing, I had various shapes and sizes too which, thankfully, are less now but one was like a miniature donut shape black and tiny … and others…. it's really unbelievable and I wondered how can floaters have such unique shapes. I did see a specialist at a teaching hospital in toronto but years ago , before i got glaucoma and now cant travel there, and he said he could perform surgery, do cataracts at same time "and clean things up" but I was too scared to have done. it took me 2 years to get the guts to have an Iridotomy…. and now I find I still cant take many meds with glaucoma… honestly, its bad enough having eye issues but hearing so many different opinions from "those in the know" doesn't help.

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Lacy, With some of the talk on floaters, it made me think of other things I’ve learned through reading online and through comments my vitreoretinal surgeon has made along the way. And..things I was never told.

– When I contemplated traditional cataract surgery on my left eye (our insurance doesn’t cover laser surgery), my surgeon told me I’d be “very happy” with the outcome. He did not mention that there were ANY risks involved. Since I had considerable floaters in that eye already, I made the request of him that he “please not cause me any more floaters” during the cataract surgery. He said he could not guarantee that. After surgery, within a couple days, the eye showed a new retinal tear that had to be repaired AND I now showed considerably more floaters (the veil, I’ve mentioned many times in posts). SO, these cataract surgery residual problems (maybe, surgeon errors) led me to need cryosurgery to heal the torn retina and the FOV for debilitating floaters.. In the time in between my cataract surgery debacle and FOV, I read “risks of cataract surgery” online and found “retinal tears” and “development of more floaters” as some of the most common adverse effects of the surgery. Additionally, I have the peripheral light streaks.

So, cataract surgery caused me: 1. A retinal tear – that needed immediate surgery 2. New floaters veil – for which I got the FOV and 3. Peripheral light streaks (called positive dysphotopsia) – that I live with

Conclusion: I went in to the cataract surgery thinking “you’ll be very happy with the results.” They told me surgeries are like “100 percent effective”…. I should have studied more. Even when you’re having a surgery that so many people get now, it is NEVER risk-free. They are not likely to tell you. I thought I had the best ophthalmology group, at least nearby me. I should have studied more online and looked into other surgeons.

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@bobbyo

Lacy, With some of the talk on floaters, it made me think of other things I’ve learned through reading online and through comments my vitreoretinal surgeon has made along the way. And..things I was never told.

– When I contemplated traditional cataract surgery on my left eye (our insurance doesn’t cover laser surgery), my surgeon told me I’d be “very happy” with the outcome. He did not mention that there were ANY risks involved. Since I had considerable floaters in that eye already, I made the request of him that he “please not cause me any more floaters” during the cataract surgery. He said he could not guarantee that. After surgery, within a couple days, the eye showed a new retinal tear that had to be repaired AND I now showed considerably more floaters (the veil, I’ve mentioned many times in posts). SO, these cataract surgery residual problems (maybe, surgeon errors) led me to need cryosurgery to heal the torn retina and the FOV for debilitating floaters.. In the time in between my cataract surgery debacle and FOV, I read “risks of cataract surgery” online and found “retinal tears” and “development of more floaters” as some of the most common adverse effects of the surgery. Additionally, I have the peripheral light streaks.

So, cataract surgery caused me: 1. A retinal tear – that needed immediate surgery 2. New floaters veil – for which I got the FOV and 3. Peripheral light streaks (called positive dysphotopsia) – that I live with

Conclusion: I went in to the cataract surgery thinking “you’ll be very happy with the results.” They told me surgeries are like “100 percent effective”…. I should have studied more. Even when you’re having a surgery that so many people get now, it is NEVER risk-free. They are not likely to tell you. I thought I had the best ophthalmology group, at least nearby me. I should have studied more online and looked into other surgeons.

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…do we ever go back to doctors and discuss that they said: you'll be happy with the outcome/surgery/whatever"….?
It's like someone slapping us in the face and we say "thank you."
I have always been a bit nervous around medical professionals and don't really say what is on my mind. Did this surgeon apologize to you? Why give a patient false hope?
It really bothers me when people criticize me or someone else for checking "anything" on Google or other web browsers. We know that it is not all factual; that basically anyone can put anything on Internet. But were it not for Internet, my not having a doctor, by having symptoms I can check before deciding whether or not to go to a clinic….I believe I am able to sort out the trusted sites and decide. And with access to sites even doctors use!!
Years ago I had a big book … Reader's Digest Medical Book forget the title and it actually listed symptoms of cancer of the cervix, which I had.. and my doctor said it was "hygiene" (I kid you not); next doctor said on examining me: "I can't see anything" … and by the time it was diagnosed, tumour was size of apple or small orange…. (1985) yet I was still afraid to speak up!!
Had I had a site similar to this , or even a computer, things would have been so different and I might have been diagnosed earlier and had less intense treatment. There are such great sites, such as this, on Internet.. so Dr.Google, I salute you!

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@lacy2

…do we ever go back to doctors and discuss that they said: you'll be happy with the outcome/surgery/whatever"….?
It's like someone slapping us in the face and we say "thank you."
I have always been a bit nervous around medical professionals and don't really say what is on my mind. Did this surgeon apologize to you? Why give a patient false hope?
It really bothers me when people criticize me or someone else for checking "anything" on Google or other web browsers. We know that it is not all factual; that basically anyone can put anything on Internet. But were it not for Internet, my not having a doctor, by having symptoms I can check before deciding whether or not to go to a clinic….I believe I am able to sort out the trusted sites and decide. And with access to sites even doctors use!!
Years ago I had a big book … Reader's Digest Medical Book forget the title and it actually listed symptoms of cancer of the cervix, which I had.. and my doctor said it was "hygiene" (I kid you not); next doctor said on examining me: "I can't see anything" … and by the time it was diagnosed, tumour was size of apple or small orange…. (1985) yet I was still afraid to speak up!!
Had I had a site similar to this , or even a computer, things would have been so different and I might have been diagnosed earlier and had less intense treatment. There are such great sites, such as this, on Internet.. so Dr.Google, I salute you!

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Well said, Lacy! I did speak up in my case but the doctors covered for each other. I, also, went to another retinal specialist for a 2nd opinion and he arrogantly said, “how can I comment on the other doctor’s surgery when I wasn’t there!” I think doctors typically do this and protect each other.

Nonetheless, my retelling my story and complaining about doctors and surgical results is just a cautionary tale for the group. No matter how simple or low risk you believe a procedure to be, don’t go forward till you educate yourself as well as possible on the risks. Also, as hard as it can be, hunt down the best doctors and surgeons you can. Even with all my recent problems with this left eye, I DO THINK that the vitreoretinal surgeon did a good job with my FOV and I’m hopeful that the vision will be, at least, pretty good for a few years anyway!

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@markymark215

Thank you all for the replies…

I booked a second opinion with a retina specialist in Chicago for the end of this month.

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Hi, In searching for information online prior to my FOV, I found considerable information under Dr Jerry Sebag and Dr Randall Wong. At an ophthalmology conference on youtube, Dr. Sebag discusses the idea of debilitating floaters and has a diagnostic process to determine when floaters are bad enough to consider a FOV. Dr. Randall Wong also provides webinars, discussion groups and interviews online. Maybe, you’ve seen these but I didn’t want to assume anything! If you have other references or discussion groups that you’ve found, please, post them. Of course, if anybody in group has good references to material, please post! Thanks

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Just an update everyone — still suffering from these eye floaters. Taking about a 2 hour drive up to the Chicagoland area for an appointment with a prominent retinal doctor — Dr. John Pollack with Illinois retinal associates. He performs floater only vitrectomys and from my research is highly regarded!

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@markymark215

Just an update everyone — still suffering from these eye floaters. Taking about a 2 hour drive up to the Chicagoland area for an appointment with a prominent retinal doctor — Dr. John Pollack with Illinois retinal associates. He performs floater only vitrectomys and from my research is highly regarded!

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@markymark215 Good luck! Please keep me posted as I too suffer from floaters that at times prohibits me from driving.

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Small update —
Meet with the retinal specialist Tuesday up by Chicago. He wants me to wait at least 3 months before committing to do the surgery. Even then, he said he would have to think about if he was willing to do the surgery. Seemed very knowledgeable and overall got a very good vibe from him.

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Hello, I would like to hear from people who have a Vitreous detachment, more specifically the Weiss ring floater. I was diagnosed very recently with vitreous detachment and has been distressing knowing I am going to live with this large floater in my field of vision. I am 55.

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@quincy9

Hello, I would like to hear from people who have a Vitreous detachment, more specifically the Weiss ring floater. I was diagnosed very recently with vitreous detachment and has been distressing knowing I am going to live with this large floater in my field of vision. I am 55.

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Hi @quincy9, I have had floaters for years and I can definitely attest about their annoyance. You will notice that I moved your inquiry to a very lengthy, ongoing discussion about vitreous detachment. I did this so you can connect with the members who have experienced this and perhaps share with you their story. I encourage you to go through the 8 pages worth of content in order to see what they went through.
@quincy9 are you also experiencing photopsia, the random flashes of light across your vision?

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