Doing things to relieve depression... Motivation and ideas

Posted by mscosette @mscosette, Mar 22, 2018

Hi I just started with Mayo Clinic connect yesterday. I noticed a couple people commented on motivation. This is something that I definitely can relate to and would like to discuss with others.
I have struggled with depression since my teens I and now 57 I’ve been seeing a wonderful psychiatrist for many years, take depression meds, and have been in and out of therapy. My clinical depression is pretty well controlled.
However I am finding myself very lonely and vulnerable.
And I want to fight this. There are things I know I need to do that would help me. But I’m not doing them.
Basically I sleep, work, watch TV and overeat at times.
My goals right now are to exercise, do what I need to do to be around people more. Really anything rather than watching television all evening would be better for me.
What has worked for other people? I thought it would be helpful to have people that I can share these types of issues with.

@hopeful33250

Hello All:

Today I received an email from Everyday Health and they had an interesting presentation on non-antidepressant methods of relieving depression. Take a look and let me know if you have tried any of these and if they have been helpful.

https://www.everydayhealth.com/pictures/promising-non-antidepressant-therapies-depression/?xid=nl_EHNLhealthyliving_2018-05-16

Teresa

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@cognac

Thanks for checking in with us and mentioning your experience.

Teresa

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@parus

Lonely and vulnerable are uncomfortable. I am lonely because of not wanting to be vulnerable to others. The old push me, pull me thing. I am in too much physical pain to volunteer. I try to get motivated to do things and can not find a valid enough reason to try and accomplish anything-why bother?

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Hi @jo2010, I'm glad that you came back to share how another member's post made you feel. You are quite right that discussion forums have limitations. We only have words, and sometimes images, to demonstrate empathetic listening. We can't see body language, which is so important in human connection and interaction. But the online communication has benefits too, especially for introverts or when it is difficult to find someone nearby who understands.

Thank you for taking the time to review Gemmax posting history and to recognize that she is a frequent post-er, and an empathetic and supportive person. At the risk of speaking on her behalf, I interpreted her phrase "I wouldn’t even consider quoting platitudes to you." to mean that she recognized that Parus and anyone who is suffering from past and present injustices deserves more than platitudes, and not as a reflection of something you shared with Parus to support her.

I'm very sorry to hear about the loss of your job. I admire your strength in returning to Connect at this particularly vulnerable time and encourage you to give the members and the community another chance.

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@parus

Lonely and vulnerable are uncomfortable. I am lonely because of not wanting to be vulnerable to others. The old push me, pull me thing. I am in too much physical pain to volunteer. I try to get motivated to do things and can not find a valid enough reason to try and accomplish anything-why bother?

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Hello @jo2010

I also want to thank you for your post. I agree with Colleen that online support groups do have their advantages and disadvantages. Your post reflected that understanding. I hope that after some time, you will feel comfortable about returning to Connect. We appreciate each of our Members as they express their thoughts and feelings and you are certainly welcome to post whenever you feel like coming back.

I also want to wish you well as you seek new employment. I know how difficult that can be. I wish you well and do look forward to hearing from you again in the future.

Teresa

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I joined a Meetup group with people who have similar interests it’s obly about15 people we are reading the52 lists with weekly goals and thought provoking ideas being with others helps my symptoms of depression which peaks in the winter

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Congratulations on keeping your depression in check. Like you I’m 57 and experienced major depression after a series of traumatic life events which caused me to take time off from work. Then my (58) year old sister got insanely jealous my dad was helping me financially for the first time ever and ostracized me from my family five years and this is when the suicidal ideation presented, I was terrified, I isolated and couldn’t believe my entire family believed my sisters lies.

During the worst of it I went to Northwestern University’s Intensive Outpatient program. 4 days per week for 3 hours for 3 months. The group teaching subject that helped me the most was DBT Therapy or also called Distress Tolerance.

It was almost immediate that when I read accepting your situation versus fighting against It lessons suffering. There are many useful mindfulness exercises which when encorported DO elevate the pain. It takes practice but taught in a group forum you meet new people and incorporte very useful tools to combat the depression that tries to take our lives away.

Distress tolerance and radical acceptance reduce pain from depression significantly but you must be diligent in incorporating these easy exercises throughout your day.

I’m taking the class again it helped so much. Behavior Health Centers associated with major medical centers typically offer free or greatly reduced pricing.

Like you I must exercise more also.

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@anneterese True that if one can accept an uncomfortable situation and not fight or try to fix it the pain lessens. I have a difficult time maintaining thus due to PTSD and all that goes with it. I am a loner for the most part as I don't want to be vulnerable. I tell myself there are things that cannot be changed or fixed and this helps me.

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@anneterese

Congratulations on keeping your depression in check. Like you I’m 57 and experienced major depression after a series of traumatic life events which caused me to take time off from work. Then my (58) year old sister got insanely jealous my dad was helping me financially for the first time ever and ostracized me from my family five years and this is when the suicidal ideation presented, I was terrified, I isolated and couldn’t believe my entire family believed my sisters lies.

During the worst of it I went to Northwestern University’s Intensive Outpatient program. 4 days per week for 3 hours for 3 months. The group teaching subject that helped me the most was DBT Therapy or also called Distress Tolerance.

It was almost immediate that when I read accepting your situation versus fighting against It lessons suffering. There are many useful mindfulness exercises which when encorported DO elevate the pain. It takes practice but taught in a group forum you meet new people and incorporte very useful tools to combat the depression that tries to take our lives away.

Distress tolerance and radical acceptance reduce pain from depression significantly but you must be diligent in incorporating these easy exercises throughout your day.

I’m taking the class again it helped so much. Behavior Health Centers associated with major medical centers typically offer free or greatly reduced pricing.

Like you I must exercise more also.

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Thanks for your post. I googled Distress Tolerance and there is good info. there. The more we can learn as we fight our battles the better!!
Ainsleigh

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