Diastolic dysfunction and resulting a-fib

My doctor wants to add a beta blocker to control my blood pressure. Mayo research suggests that’s a mistake for someone with diastolic dysfunction (DD), which I may have (based on BP readings in recent months). I’d like to hear from anybody who has been diagnosed with DD about symptoms and treatments.

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Heart Rhythm Conditions group.

Thanks for the update @predictable. Given that you are about to start carvedilol (Coreg), you may want to read this thread started by @teatime http://mayocl.in/28YeSeN It includes a response by a Mayo Clinic pharmacist. @neeci and @teatime had to wean off the drug, but many use it successfully. We’ll be interested in your sharing your experience starting and finding your balanced dosage.

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@predictable

I owe everybody on this thread — especially @hopeful33250, @dawn_giacabazi, and @cynaburst — an update on my Diastolic Dysfunction after visiting with my cardiologist a few days ago. He told me A-fib is the very definition of DD, which is now a condition I probably can’t avoid, and after 2 years of it, I have learned to manage it. Since I have no tangible symptoms (other than a tendency to bleed from wounds, thanks to Coumadin therapy) he saw no reason for surgery and believes no medication would “cure” me. So management is the challenge, and he flatly stated that I need not fear trying a beta blocker in that effort. So my nephrologist prescribed carvedilol to bring my blood pressure down, starting with a minimal dose, possibly raising it over the next six weeks in hope of reaching a maximum positive (balanced) result.

Does this make sense to you? Do you have any suggestions for me based on your experience?

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Martin: Thanks for the update. I wish you well as you pursue new treatments. I was not aware that DD and A-Fib were related, this will give me something to discuss with my cardiologist next month. My blood pressure tends to be low at times with a big gap between the diastolic and systolic numbers, perhaps that is related to the aortic insufficiency. I am planning on ordering that blood pressure monitor that has been discussed. I need to keep an accurate handle on what is happening. Please keep me posted on how your new med therapy is working for you.
Blessings,
Teresa

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That does make sense. I also have diastolic dysfunction as a result of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy and I take a beta blocker and have for years. I do not have a fib, but beta blockers are a common medication for Afib as rate control is key.

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Thanks for the reminder, @dawn_giacabazi. I want to finish preparing a request to my cardiologist, nephrologist, and urologist for approval of some pharmacogenomics (PGx) tests to see whether any of them — or my HMO — is prepared to add them to their protocols for a range of diseases. I’ll submit the first such request in about 2 weeks.

Martin

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@predictable

I owe everybody on this thread — especially @hopeful33250, @dawn_giacabazi, and @cynaburst — an update on my Diastolic Dysfunction after visiting with my cardiologist a few days ago. He told me A-fib is the very definition of DD, which is now a condition I probably can’t avoid, and after 2 years of it, I have learned to manage it. Since I have no tangible symptoms (other than a tendency to bleed from wounds, thanks to Coumadin therapy) he saw no reason for surgery and believes no medication would “cure” me. So management is the challenge, and he flatly stated that I need not fear trying a beta blocker in that effort. So my nephrologist prescribed carvedilol to bring my blood pressure down, starting with a minimal dose, possibly raising it over the next six weeks in hope of reaching a maximum positive (balanced) result.

Does this make sense to you? Do you have any suggestions for me based on your experience?

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Teresa, I pursued the DD and A-fib link after seeing some research from Mayo suggesting that beta blockers could produce adverse effects in some more serious DD cases. It turns out that the threat of this is rare — not for those of us who have DD as a result of A-fib, according to my cardiologist, but in cases where there is moderate to serious DD but no A-fib. So he gave the green light for me to take Carvedilol.

Martin

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You are welcome. Remember these particular test is not for diseases. This is to help determine the exact medications to treat you at the right drug, at the right dose & the right time to prevent over dose and drug interactions. To also help prevent diseases like liver & kidndy failure from taking wrong medications. 🙂

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@dawn_giacabazi

You are welcome. Remember these particular test is not for diseases. This is to help determine the exact medications to treat you at the right drug, at the right dose & the right time to prevent over dose and drug interactions. To also help prevent diseases like liver & kidndy failure from taking wrong medications. 🙂

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Yes, I should have said “for a range of therapies” rather than diseases, right?

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I am sorry. I didn’t mean to correct you just want to make sure you knew it was more specific than testing diseases. That would be a whole different testing and a whole different set of guidelines and coverage by insurance.

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No sweat! You’re right! Bad use of the word “diseases” by me.

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Not good about your arrhythmia. But it is what it is. Fortunately, one of my early cardiologists suggested that beta blockers might not be good for my issues. Therefore, I have resisted them for years, along with CCBs and ACEs. Now the research seems to have caught up with this, according to the crews at Mayo-MI. You might catch some of their videos on cardiac, amyloidosis, etc. They are very, very good. Morie Gertz and Martha Grogan deal with this stuff often in videos and writings.

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@predictable

I owe everybody on this thread — especially @hopeful33250, @dawn_giacabazi, and @cynaburst — an update on my Diastolic Dysfunction after visiting with my cardiologist a few days ago. He told me A-fib is the very definition of DD, which is now a condition I probably can’t avoid, and after 2 years of it, I have learned to manage it. Since I have no tangible symptoms (other than a tendency to bleed from wounds, thanks to Coumadin therapy) he saw no reason for surgery and believes no medication would “cure” me. So management is the challenge, and he flatly stated that I need not fear trying a beta blocker in that effort. So my nephrologist prescribed carvedilol to bring my blood pressure down, starting with a minimal dose, possibly raising it over the next six weeks in hope of reaching a maximum positive (balanced) result.

Does this make sense to you? Do you have any suggestions for me based on your experience?

Jump to this post

Hi Martin
Recently I started having high Diastolic numbers and feel nauseated or tired. Cardiologist tried 24 monitor and couldn’t find any afib

What additional tests should I ask him to conduct ?

My DP hovering around 90 and I feel nauseated when it does and can’t even do small things

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