Diabetic Diet for type 2

Posted by kateia @kateia, Sep 23, 2021

I am tired of all the fussing with diabetic drugs. All it does is allow me to eat what I shouldn't be eating. I'm going to try and do it on my own again. My biggest question is how soon will the heart disease, neuropathy, kidney failure, eye problems, take effect if I just eat right and exercise? My doctor used the "fear" angle to get me to take the metformin to begin with. I know what to do. Just have to do it. I need support from you guys as not much help around here!!

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Taking meds and/or helpful supplements (such as berberine) are NOT to take the place of eating right and exercising. Whether or not you take them, YOU should NOT allow yourself "to eat what you shouldn't be eating."

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I know someone in his 40's who took a supplement but he also was very serious about what and how much he ate as well as exercising. It took awhile, but he didn't give up, and now he doesn't even need the supplement as his glucose counts are now in the normal range! Of course, he continues to exercise and eat right. If you "know what to do," DO it. You don't know what great things you can accomplish unless you seriously try. You might prove to the doctor that you don't need his med. Or you might find it helpful to add a med or supplement to your regime. But either way, you will improve your health, and aren't you worth doing that for?

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@kateia – I was also diagnosed Type 2 diabetic and took Jenuvia for a couple of years. My father had CAD and diabetes, high cholesterol.
I was overweight and decided to lose weight- I lost 45 lbs and I did not need to take the pills. Just diet controlled. Blood sugar and HgbA1C are close to normal.
I don’t think there is a safe time specifically when you have to worry about the accompanying illnesses.
I do know that I already have coronary calcifications- and I have always tried my best with diet and exercise, which made me upset in a way. It’s genetic and current treatments are there to delay and prevent problems.

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Diabetes is a serious disease that absolutely requires "fussing with". Once you have it that "fussing" begins and never stops! However, "fussing" begins with regular testing of one's glucose levels which informs one as to how their body functions/reacts to various factors. It can be very interesting and surprising as to what factors are involved. Such factors can vary greatly from one individual to another. However, this provides one a learning experience from which to grow from and respond to. Also, this provides one with help as to what medication needs are called for in addressing their diabetic disease. However, bear in mind Big Pharma loves the diabetic population which it continually deluges with rather dangerous advertisements on supplements that always seemingly have a limited life because of serious side effects.
Yes, hopefully help is around the corner from somewhere that will give the diabetic world some relief from this required "fussing" or at least lessen it somewhat. It could be that DMR ( Duodinal Mucosal Resurfacing (sp?)) could be that help. Testing is presently taking place in the US. It has been approved in the EU. We shall see. Big Pharma will undoubtedly not support that effort.
So, keep on "fussing". Yes, wisely but keep at it and good luck!

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@ltssjs

Diabetes is a serious disease that absolutely requires "fussing with". Once you have it that "fussing" begins and never stops! However, "fussing" begins with regular testing of one's glucose levels which informs one as to how their body functions/reacts to various factors. It can be very interesting and surprising as to what factors are involved. Such factors can vary greatly from one individual to another. However, this provides one a learning experience from which to grow from and respond to. Also, this provides one with help as to what medication needs are called for in addressing their diabetic disease. However, bear in mind Big Pharma loves the diabetic population which it continually deluges with rather dangerous advertisements on supplements that always seemingly have a limited life because of serious side effects.
Yes, hopefully help is around the corner from somewhere that will give the diabetic world some relief from this required "fussing" or at least lessen it somewhat. It could be that DMR ( Duodinal Mucosal Resurfacing (sp?)) could be that help. Testing is presently taking place in the US. It has been approved in the EU. We shall see. Big Pharma will undoubtedly not support that effort.
So, keep on "fussing". Yes, wisely but keep at it and good luck!

Jump to this post

When I originally was diagnosed I immediately changed my diet and exercise program. My A1C was 10.2 originally and within 4 months I had it down to 5.8. This is what I want to go back to doing. The only reason that I went off the wagon was due to Covid and a couple of people with negative comments. So I'm going to try again. Thanks for the encouragement.

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@astaingegerdm

@kateia – I was also diagnosed Type 2 diabetic and took Jenuvia for a couple of years. My father had CAD and diabetes, high cholesterol.
I was overweight and decided to lose weight- I lost 45 lbs and I did not need to take the pills. Just diet controlled. Blood sugar and HgbA1C are close to normal.
I don’t think there is a safe time specifically when you have to worry about the accompanying illnesses.
I do know that I already have coronary calcifications- and I have always tried my best with diet and exercise, which made me upset in a way. It’s genetic and current treatments are there to delay and prevent problems.

Jump to this post

I'm 65 years old and just want to watch what I eat and exercise more. I've gotten the numbers down before and am sure I can do it again. I'm my worst enemy when it comes to sticking to things. All I know is when I had everything controlled I felt so much better. I can do it again.

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@kateia – Yes, I’m sure you can do it!
I’m 77- you are just a spring chicken!!

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I noticed your comments about your "diet" and would like to respond. I've been a type 1 diabetic for 56 years, on insulin. I don't like to refer to my diet as such, but consider it a meal plan. I am in control, I choose what foods I eat, and I make sure I plan ahead when grocery shopping. Many recipes are fat-laden and high starch….read up on healthy ways to make these dishes so the entire family can eat healthy. That way you don't feel deprived. I use lots of frozen vegetables, fruits, yogurt, sugar-free drink, lean meats, and watch portion size.
I hope this will help you.

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@kateia and everybody else that commented in this thread. Diabetes is hard to deal with. Yesterday I wrote an “epistle” in a comment on another discussion about the emotional side of Diabetes. I love Mayo Clinic Connect as a platform to share support and encouragement with each other. All the previous comments in this discussion confirms that. It sounds like you are already starting to turn things around for a return to better health in the New Year. You are in my prayers. I wish and hope for you to God’s love and blessings.

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Didn't know that anyone had posted until just a few minutes ago!! Thanks for all of your support! I have decided to take one metformin a day and watch what I eat. My glucose levels are pretty good and have gotten a1c to 7. Just keeping on keeping on!!

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I am glad to find this support group. I have "fussed" with my diabetes for well over ten years. I went through several supplements from oral to injectables. I now take two forms of insulin daily – Humalog at meal time and Levemir before bed. Starting about May 2021, I began losing weight without trying, although I have avoided starches in my diet. An endocrinologist told me several years ago that for my height, I should weigh no less than 165. But in December, my weight was 145 and still dropping. Along with it was lots of gut ache and the need to have frequent bowel movements. A new endocrinologist let me convince him and my insurance to consent to an MRI of my abdomen. As a result, my diagnosis was EPI – pancreas insufficiency. Now, I am caught between two prescriptions warring with each other. Creon keeps my pancreas digesting my food for weight gain and stability but my blood glucose has spiked terribly so I must triple the amount of insulin I take each day. I wish I could find an answer soon. I'm 82 and still active now.

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