Diabetic Diet for type 2

Posted by kateia @kateia, Sep 23, 2021

I am tired of all the fussing with diabetic drugs. All it does is allow me to eat what I shouldn't be eating. I'm going to try and do it on my own again. My biggest question is how soon will the heart disease, neuropathy, kidney failure, eye problems, take effect if I just eat right and exercise? My doctor used the "fear" angle to get me to take the metformin to begin with. I know what to do. Just have to do it. I need support from you guys as not much help around here!!

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Last year I had two kidney stones at the same time. I ended up having two surgeries, one month apart, to remove them because they would not move on their own. Before that my blood tests were always normal. Now I am in stage 3 kidney failure. Last month for the first time ever, my fasting blood glucose level was 103. This morning it was 117. I am 5'2, 125 pounds and 56 years old. My HC1 is 6.0. I feel like my health is declining suddenly and unexpectedly although i still feel perfectly normal. Is anyone else managing all of these problems? What is going on?

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@kateia

When I originally was diagnosed I immediately changed my diet and exercise program. My A1C was 10.2 originally and within 4 months I had it down to 5.8. This is what I want to go back to doing. The only reason that I went off the wagon was due to Covid and a couple of people with negative comments. So I'm going to try again. Thanks for the encouragement.

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What diet you followed , what foods you avoided? please write more as it will be helpful to people like me.thanks

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@sheelaseetamsetty

What diet you followed , what foods you avoided? please write more as it will be helpful to people like me.thanks

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Initially my dr. didn't give a hoot. She never set up appointments with a dietician and never did anything she said she was going to do. So I set up and met three times with a dietician. At $150/hr that's all I could do. I read EVERYTHING about diabetes that I could find. Dwelling on good resources. Then, I got a notebook and wrote EVERYTHING that I ate down. I tried to keep my carb count around 40 to 45/meal. Plus two daily snacks. Now I know, if I eat the right carbs, it can be up to 60. I also started walking every day. One mile. Plus working an additional 2 hours in my garden. I bought a meter and taught myself how to check my blood. (Before the dietician) and did so 2-3 times per day writing down what the numbers were. Amazingly, without meds, I lost 1-2 lbs. per week and within 3 months had lost close to 30 pounds. My original A1C was 10.2 and four months after starting I was down to 5.8. I allowed myself desert when I had special meetings only. We ate fruit mainly for desert. I'd cut it up, microwave for a couple of minutes and top with truvia. My husband ate what I ate. No chips, ice cream, donuts, cake, cookies, were in the house. Cut out most of bread, rice, and pasta. We ate beef, pork, chicken, and fish. Larger portions as the carb count was low. Nothing deep fat fried, fried, etc. Mostly baked, Ate whatever vegetable was in season. Usually allowed myself 1/2 – 1 cup. No butter. Ate everything I wanted to other than high sugar foods. Made smoothies using cottage cheese, fruit, almond/coconut milk and whey protein powder. At that time I was in my early 60's. NOW. I'm struggling. Tried Metformin and the side effects are awful. It did help my sugar counts. It may work for others. I'm working to eat 40-60 carbs/meal. Meat, fruit, veggies. Only small amounts of potato, rice, bread on occasion, not every day. I have found some bread products that I like. Joseph's makes a low carb flat bread that we use for pizza. They also make a pita bread that is only 4 carbs/1/2 of pita. That replaces buns for sandwiches. Village Hearth makes a thin, multi-grain bun that has 22 carbs. if you feel you want the "real" thing. To make a long story short. You have to watch what you eat and exercise daily. I walk, garden, and trying to incorporate resistance training. Snacks: try to find something where you have a protein and a carb together. Like a Turkey stick and carrots (2-3). Set a specific time for your snacks. Drink a lot of water. NO POP. Eat fruit and not fruit juice unless you juice it yourself. You can also have an evening snack if it helps your morning blood sugars. Good luck. Take one day at a time. This is a lifetime change!!

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@kateia congrats on all your hard work. The good results of your efforts are inspiring. Thank you for the dietary tips. So helpful and encouraging.

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@kateia

I'm 65 years old and just want to watch what I eat and exercise more. I've gotten the numbers down before and am sure I can do it again. I'm my worst enemy when it comes to sticking to things. All I know is when I had everything controlled I felt so much better. I can do it again.

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Hi, I'm 75 and pretty sure I've developed type 2 diabetes. My doctor retired, and the new doctor wants to see me in 6 mo. He's ordered many blood tests when I first contacted him, but when the A1C came back 6.7, I told him I'd like to try diet and exercise myself. Well, my life has become a CONSTANT state of stress, little sleep, fast food, moving and helping take care of my adult daughter who has numerous auto immune conditions. I use to be very active, but on the heavy side. I had a bad fall in 2019 and was in a wheelchair 6mo. I'm having trouble walking, so the exercise I do now is minimal. I use my Cubie, that allows me to bike (no handlebars) and count 5-10thousand steps each day. I lost my husband unexpectedly, so I have no other help. Enough complaining. I just wanted to know if you can have neuropathy in your feet and ankles without having pain. I feel like my feet and ankles are wrapped very tightly in ace bandages and I'm walking on crumbled up paper, but I have no pain. I've also put on 20 lbs since this all began about 3yrs. ago. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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Been on oral med for diabetes for years and it is quite pricey which is tough but was working well until this year. This year my doctor tried a sliding scale fast acting insulin which made my life worse; the long acting insulin does help. I am blessed to be able to have a Libre device which reads my sugar levels day and night. I have a lot of other health challenges, but this experience pushed me over the edge as regards my attitude. I have hated how I have felt and the focus I have had to increase on diet and awareness of my health. It seems like there is no way/time to take a break from this focus. I was a nurse, have seen a lot of sicker folk, have compassion except for myself…this is not a good place to be. I know, even children have IDDM and it breaks my heart to think of them and their families who need to be so vigilant. I just wanted to share with you my emotional reaction to this health change. I have no idea how long it takes for high blood sugars to affect the body, just can only focus on one day at a time. One other challenge which complicates my diabetes is my food allergies and intolerances which activate/increase my IBS-diarrhea. Socially this is so harsh. I hope you find your way through this challenging disease and find peace/strength. I pray the same for myself. Blessings to you.

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Read “The Diabetes Code” by Dr. Jason Fung and try intermittent fasting and a low carbohydrate diet.

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@mmnp

Been on oral med for diabetes for years and it is quite pricey which is tough but was working well until this year. This year my doctor tried a sliding scale fast acting insulin which made my life worse; the long acting insulin does help. I am blessed to be able to have a Libre device which reads my sugar levels day and night. I have a lot of other health challenges, but this experience pushed me over the edge as regards my attitude. I have hated how I have felt and the focus I have had to increase on diet and awareness of my health. It seems like there is no way/time to take a break from this focus. I was a nurse, have seen a lot of sicker folk, have compassion except for myself…this is not a good place to be. I know, even children have IDDM and it breaks my heart to think of them and their families who need to be so vigilant. I just wanted to share with you my emotional reaction to this health change. I have no idea how long it takes for high blood sugars to affect the body, just can only focus on one day at a time. One other challenge which complicates my diabetes is my food allergies and intolerances which activate/increase my IBS-diarrhea. Socially this is so harsh. I hope you find your way through this challenging disease and find peace/strength. I pray the same for myself. Blessings to you.

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When I read this, I definitely relate. "One other challenge which complicates my diabetes is my food allergies and intolerances which activate/increase my IBS-diarrhea. Socially this is so harsh. "
We are a family with a plethora of food allergies, plus my diabetic husband who needs to watch his diet. I have a strategy for eating out that works for me, I learned it from a friend who cannot eat solid food, but joins our outings anyway. I know there will be little if anything on many menus for me, but try to find one thing to order, along with a beverage. I view this as social time only, and eat my main meal before or after the outing.
When it comes to social gatherings, I make sure the host/hostess know of my limitations, and if asked I will suggest one dish that I can eat. Or I offer to bring one if appropriate. Then I put a tiny dab of a few other foods, along with the allowable one, on my plate and join the group. I try never to make an issue of it, and ask my hosts to do the same. If I am urged to try something I cannot eat I just say "no thank you." I have lived with these limits for many years, and manage to maintain an active social life.
By the way, we have also developed a list of restaurants that can and will prepare safe foods, and will suggest them as destinations if asked for input.

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@sueinmn

When I read this, I definitely relate. "One other challenge which complicates my diabetes is my food allergies and intolerances which activate/increase my IBS-diarrhea. Socially this is so harsh. "
We are a family with a plethora of food allergies, plus my diabetic husband who needs to watch his diet. I have a strategy for eating out that works for me, I learned it from a friend who cannot eat solid food, but joins our outings anyway. I know there will be little if anything on many menus for me, but try to find one thing to order, along with a beverage. I view this as social time only, and eat my main meal before or after the outing.
When it comes to social gatherings, I make sure the host/hostess know of my limitations, and if asked I will suggest one dish that I can eat. Or I offer to bring one if appropriate. Then I put a tiny dab of a few other foods, along with the allowable one, on my plate and join the group. I try never to make an issue of it, and ask my hosts to do the same. If I am urged to try something I cannot eat I just say "no thank you." I have lived with these limits for many years, and manage to maintain an active social life.
By the way, we have also developed a list of restaurants that can and will prepare safe foods, and will suggest them as destinations if asked for input.

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Thank you for your reply. Sounds like you have a great plan!

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